Thread Rating:

pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
August 31st, 2011 at 12:49:06 PM permalink
Quote: Alan

Thanks for the explanation. I didn't get into details about that word(Ven) with her, she mentioned it and walked away. My comments in the () were obviously a wrong assumption.



Native speakers of a language usually don't think about grammer. She may have never heard of the word "imperitive".

Similarly as an English speaker you probably never thought about why the word "goed" does not exist. You just naturally use the word "went".

Likewise the regular grammar rule is to add "ed" to the end of a verb to get the past tense. So "I talk" becomes "I talked" in the past tense.

But if you look at the most commonly used verbs in the English language, you actually have to go pretty far down the list until you find one which uses the ed ending to make the past tense.

be
have
do
say
get
make
go
know
take
see
come
think
look
want
give
use
find
tell
ask
work
seem
feel
try
leave
call
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23441
September 1st, 2011 at 10:38:48 AM permalink
Palabra del día: TRAER

Thanks to all for all the comments yesterday.

Today I'd like to look at another pair of similar words: traer (bring) and llevar (take). Llevar is one of those pesky words that is used in lots of situations, where in English there would be different words. However, one of the common usages I would loosely translate as take, as in "take me to the movies." However, you could also say in English "bring me to the movies." In that situation, in Spanish, should you use traer or llevar?

Much like ir and venir from two days ago, the key is where the speaker is at the moment he is speaking. If he is at the place being discussed he would use traer, otherwise llevar.

Ejemplo time:

Consider the following exchange over the phone at a Pizza Restaurant with take-out service.

Customer: Me llevas una pizza con champiñones y chorizo, por favor. = Bring/take to me a pizza with mushrooms and sausage, please.
Employee: Te lo traemos en 40 minutos. = We will bring/take it to you in 40 minutes.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
September 1st, 2011 at 10:59:32 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Consider the following exchange over the phone at a Pizza Restaurant with take-out service.



Actually you'd say "Me manda una pizza...." "Send me a pizza....."

Here are some examples:

Traete unos refrescos cuando vengas a la sala de juntas. Bring some soda when you come to the meeting room

Llevale este papel al abogado. Take this paper to the lawyer.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Alan
Alan
Joined: Jun 14, 2011
  • Threads: 17
  • Posts: 582
September 1st, 2011 at 11:02:44 AM permalink
Por favor traiga algo de cerveza con eso.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
September 1st, 2011 at 4:16:55 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Llevar is one of those pesky words that is used in lots of situations, where in English there would be different words. However, one of the common usages I would loosely translate as take, as in "take me to the movies."



Actually the word take is called by the Oxford English Dictionary "one of the elemental words of the language". It is one of the ten most commonly used verbs. It is the English word that has multiple meanings in Spanish. Like all such word it is based on an Old Norse word (taka). It is similar to the word get or do in they are words with very little explicit meaning.

take: tomar, coger (Wiz: watch the use of coger as it has vulgar meaning in many Spanish countries, especially Argentina )
take a bath: banarse
take a shower: ducharse
take a walk: pasearse
take advantage: aprovecharse
take apart: deshacer
take care of oneself: cuidarse
take an oath: jurar
take away: llevar
take notice (of): advertir, fijarse
take off (airplane): despegar
take off (clothing):quitarse
take out of pawn: desempenar
take out (something) sacar
take possession: apoderarse
take power: apoderarse
take the lead: adelantarse
take part in: romar parte en


However, the use of the verb llevar in the following situations seems strange to an English speaker.
La novia llevaba un vestido muy bonito
Llevaba unos pantalones verdes
llevar la finca
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23441
September 2nd, 2011 at 9:46:53 AM permalink
Palabra del día: E

Today's word is e. I like one-letter words in any language. In Spanish this is one you don't see very often. It means the same thing as y (and), but is used in certain circumstances only. As I understand it, you would use e if the word following it begins with i or hi (remember, the h is silent in Spanish). The reason being is that it would sound awkward to have the same syllable twice in a row.

The word y sounds like the letter E in English (not the sound E makes, but the letter itself). The word e is pronounced like somewhat like the word "a" in English, but also somewhat like "eh," as in "Eh, I can't hear you sonny, talk louder." I'm sure the better Spanish speakers can explain it better than me.

Ejemplo time.

El es guapo e inteligente. = He is handsome and intelligent.

On a related topic, we all know there are lots of exceptions to the rule that nouns ending in a have the feminine article la. Are some of the these exceptions for clarity in speaking. For example, we have el alma (the soul). When spoken, that is more clear than la alma would be with the two a sounds blending in together. Am I onto something here, or totally off base?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
September 2nd, 2011 at 10:23:12 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

On a related topic, we all know there are lots of exceptions to the rule that nouns ending in a have the feminine article la. Are some of the these exceptions for clarity in speaking. For example, we have el alma (the soul). When spoken, that is more clear than la alma would be with the two a sounds blending in together. Am I onto something here, or totally off base?



Spanish frowns of having a word ending in a vowel followed by one beginning with the same vowel. ergo, the "e" instead of "y" as you mentioned. But also things es "el alma," "el agua," and so on. This doesn't applies to consonants, tou, such as "el león." And none of this explains why words like "día" are preceeded by "el."

Anwyay, just to confuse you some more, the words alma y agua are not masculine nouns regardless fo the articles sued. If using the plural, you'd say "las almas, and "las aguas." Día, on the other hand, is always amsculine, as the plural is los días.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
September 4th, 2011 at 4:08:07 AM permalink
Quote: Paigowdan

Yo recuerdo este pais cuando fue Americano



I pulled this comment from another thread. It is obviously saying "I remember when this country was American". It seems to me that a version of acordarse would be better than recordar.

Also fue seems wrong. Shouldn't it be era?

Me acuerdo de este país cuando era estadounidense.

Of course, American is derived from the Italian name Amerigo Vespucci. The name applies to all of the Americas, both North and South, Northern and Latin. But I always though estadounidense was overly awkward.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
September 4th, 2011 at 4:19:46 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I pulled this comment from another thread. It is obviously saying "I remember when this country was American". It seems to me that a version of acordarse would be better than recordar.

Also fue seems wrong. Shouldn't it be era?




Dan's phrase is just fine. "Era" would be more appropriate, but the use of "fue" is also correct.

Quote:

Me acuerdo de este país cuando era estadounidense.



That one's correct, too, but it seems more contrived.

Quote:

Of course, American is derived from the Italian name Amerigo Vespucci.



Who, BTW, happens to be the man who first mapped the Western Hemisphere, or something like that. The new continent might as well have been called Triana, after Rodrigo de Triana who first spotted land in Columbus' first voyage. or Columbia, after Columbus.

Quote:

The name applies to all of the Americas, both North and South, Northern and Latin. But I always though estadounidense was overly awkward.



It's a made up term, and not a very good one. In English it would be like saying "Unitedstatesian." Ridiculous. BTW, Mexico's official name is "Estados Unidos Mexicanos," pretty much aping our northern neighbor.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23441
September 4th, 2011 at 8:08:56 AM permalink
Palabra del día: ROMPER

I like the sound of today's word. It sounds very French. It means to break. I would be interested to know what the root "romp" means. In English it means to play roughly and carelessly, perhaps breaking things in the process. It can also bean to have an easy and decisive victory, perhaps breaking the other team in the process, if not physically, then at least in spirit. Hopefully Paco can enlighten us on the etymology.

Ejemplo time.

Es necesario a romper huevos para hacer una tortilla. = It is necessary to break eggs to make an omelet.

I get tortilla for omelet from spanishdict.com. However, what I think of as a tortilla is the round thing made of corn or flour used for making tacos. Do people ever get confused?

In other news, we're just six posts away from becoming the longest thread.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

  • Jump to: