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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 23rd, 2011 at 2:59:51 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought that pendejo was a pretty strong slang word meaning idiot. Personally, I prefer the milder tontico. I welcome comments from the usual experts.



My grandfather (Salamanca region of Spain) used the word a lot, and he meant it as pretty biting criticism. It was one of those words that people have pointed out in Argentina that has a fairly mild meaning. To be called "pendejo" means you are young and inexperienced. It probably has the worst meaning in Puerto Rico.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 23rd, 2011 at 3:12:35 PM permalink
Quote: allenwalker

...
Estaba comiendo
Estaba hablando
Estaba viviendo
Estaba ocupando



Pretty good idea. However, it isn't enough to just speak Spanish, you have to read and listen to it as well.
Nareed
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May 23rd, 2011 at 5:11:01 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought that pendejo was a pretty strong slang word meaning idiot.



It's more or less one of the words you can't say on TV. In middle-class and above households, a child saying that would be severey reprimanded (to say the least).

Quote:

Personally, I prefer the milder tontico. I welcome comments from the usual experts.



That word would get you laughed at in mexico. Try "menso," which falls about between dumb and idiot, "estúpido," which shoulnd't require translation, or "idiota," ditto.
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Nareed
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May 23rd, 2011 at 7:04:41 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

My grandfather (Salamanca region of Spain) used the word a lot, and he meant it as pretty biting criticism. It was one of those words that people have pointed out in Argentina that has a fairly mild meaning. To be called "pendejo" means you are young and inexperienced. It probably has the worst meaning in Puerto Rico.



There are plenty of such variations.

In México "pinche" means something like "damned" or "f***ing" Example "Pinche idiota" means "f**** idiot." In Spain the same word means something like cook's assistant or a helper to the cooks in a kitchen. There's a joke about it, even, about two Mexicans looking for work at a restaurant in Madrid.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 23rd, 2011 at 11:06:00 PM permalink
This CNN transcript of Piers Morgan- Rob Lowe interview has the following quote:

LOWE: Once you go through your turn in the barrel, you have a unique perspective on it. And what I've learned is it's a good thing to be in the business long enough that you have your turn in the barrel. It's really easy to be, you know, a one hit wonder who never gets his turn. It's also real easy to be in the barrel and never come out of it.

Now, almost everyone knows that Rob Lowe is using the punchline of an old vulgar sailor's joke. But the phrase has pretty much worked it's way into the language so that it is not considered very offensive. But the term "glory hole" while also not actually cursing is still considered pretty vulgar. You couldn't work that into an interview without making TV censors uncomfortable. Most of the time, it is better to stay on the safe side, and not to use words that are considered vulgar anywhere.

Now that said, as an American it is pretty hard for me to consider "fanny" to be offensive, even if I know it is very vulgar in British and Australian English.
thecesspit
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May 23rd, 2011 at 11:17:00 PM permalink
I'd just go for vulgar for fanny, rather than "very vulgar".

My parents would tell me to "stop fannying around" and I'm sure at least one teacher called the football team a "bunch of fannies" for not wanting to play in the pouring rain. Even if directly meaning a ladies front bottom, it's archaic vulgar rather than as direct as the c-word or even the v-word.
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Wizard
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Wizard 
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May 24th, 2011 at 6:05:32 AM permalink
Fecha: 24 de Mayo, 2011
Palabra del día: ABREGO


The word of the day comes from the northern and quiet side of Isla Vista.

Abrego = south-west wind. I assume they are referring to the Santa Ana winds, which do reach as far north as Santa Barbara. For those who don't know, these are dry desert winds that are flow into the southern California and northern Mexico beach cities via pressure conditions that tend to build up in the fall and winter. They are often blamed for spreading around wildfires.

Here is an ejemplo.

El abrego derribó mi sombrero. = The south-west wind blew off my hat.

By the way, is there some secret word for hat in Spanish we gringos don't know about? It seems like you never hear native Spanish speakers use the word sombrero, except perhaps to refer to the gigantic ridiculous-looking things that people put on for "zebra" pictures in Tijuana.

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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 24th, 2011 at 6:24:30 AM permalink

I think El gorro is a knitted cap or it's modern equivalent.
Nareed
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May 24th, 2011 at 6:57:14 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

El abrego le derribó mi sombrero. = The south-west wind blew off my hat.



You've managed to use I word I dind't know.

In any case, you've got an extra "le" in your example. It's just "derribó mi sombrero"

Quote:

By the way, is there some secret word for hat in Spanish we gringos don't know about?



No. Sombrero means hat. Any hat. A fedora, those things British royals wear, etc. As Paco pointed out, gorro, and gorra, are words for other types of head coverings. Gorra is used for baseball caps, for example.

What Americans call a "sombrero" I'm sure has a proper name for its type, but I've no idea what it might be.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 24th, 2011 at 8:45:12 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You've managed to use I word I dind't know.



Real Academia Española ©: ábrego. (Del lat. afrĭcus). m. Viento templado y húmedo del sudoeste, que trae las lluvias.

It seems to be a word from Spain, and not common in Latin America. The word is not in "RAE Diccionario panhispánico de dudas". It is a street in Santa Barbara.

It is a surname in Mexico, one shared by a popular weather girl

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