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Nareed
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May 22nd, 2011 at 8:24:09 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I should have said that there is no English word closely related to caballo (except chivalry which has a somewhat complex history). You simply have to memorize the word.



Cavalry. Cavalier (noun).
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Nareed
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May 22nd, 2011 at 8:27:33 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Does Mexico or Mexicans still hold any hard feelings about that?



There's a lot of hard feelings about America. But that seems more of a universal problem. Jealousy's like that.

Me, I'm pissed your countrymen stopped so far north. Then again my family didn't arrive to these hemisphere until early in the XX Century.
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pacomartin
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May 22nd, 2011 at 8:47:46 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Does Mexico or Mexicans still hold any hard feelings about that?

When I went to Panama I was worried they might still be angry about the 1990 US invasion of Panama. I asked several people about it while I was there and nobody seemed very eager to discuss it.




In Chicano Park in San Diego, CALTRANS objected to the word Aztlan which has been spelled out for many years. The word was considered militant. For those of you who don't know, Aztlan is the legendary home of the Aztecs before they went on their centuries long journey which led them to conquer present day Mexico City. They told Cortez, that they no longer knew where it was located. While most scholarship points to the Pacific Coast north of Puerto Vallarta, the legend was picked up by the Chicano movement in the American Southwest in the 1960's as being located somewhere in that region. The chicanos were trying to reclaim their ancestral homeland.

When I lived in Oaxaca where there is a lot of miltancy, there seemed to be little distinction between the white power elite of Mexico and that of the USA. You would invariably see white leaders of both countries in protest pictures shaking hands. But, there was not a lot of hostility towards white people in general.



With regard to the Mexican-American war, the person of Abraham Lincoln is well regarded in Mexico. First because he was adamantly against the war when he was a representative, and secondly because he aided Benito Juarez with weapons in his fight against the Emperor Maximilian in the 1860's, even though he was fighting the civil war. There is a big statue of Abraham Lincoln in Tijuana.

Wizard
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May 23rd, 2011 at 1:50:06 AM permalink
Fecha: 23 de Mayo, 2011
Palabra del día = SUEÑO


We go back to Isla Vista (island view) for today's word of the day, sueño = sleepy/dream.

For a rowdy college town, Sueño Road was indeed comparatively sleepy and quiet. Everything between Sueño and El Colegio (the college) was not as ruidoso (noisy) and lleno de gente (full of people) as parts closer to the playa (beach) or the colegio.

As is often the case with señales (signs) in the U.S., Isla Vista omits the swiggly thing above the n on the signage, which say sueno.

Two words to be careful not to confuse sueño with are dormir (to sleep) and cansado (tired).

Finally, sueño brings up what I find a strange use of grammar in Spanish:

Tengo sueño = I'm sleepy.

An amateur (ahem) might translate that as "I have sleepy," but with certain adjectives the verb tener is used to mean "I am" rather than "I have." I don't like it any more than you do, but nobody consulted me when they made the language.
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EvenBob
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May 23rd, 2011 at 5:52:38 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard



We go back to Isla Vista



When I lived in Santa Barbara, I went to Isla Vista all the time to a place called Paperback Alley, where you could trade in your old paperbacks for other used paperbacks, plus a few bucks. This was around 1980. I love Santa Barbara and would live there if they had a real casino..
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Nareed
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May 23rd, 2011 at 6:43:35 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

As is often the case with señals (signs) in the U.S., Isla Vista omits the swiggly thing above the n on the signage, which say sueno.



"SeñalEs" :)
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pacomartin
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May 23rd, 2011 at 7:01:33 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Finally, sueño brings up what I find a strange use of grammar in Spanish:
Tengo sueño = I'm sleepy.
An amateur (ahem) might translate that as "I have sleepy," but with certain adjectives the verb tener is used to mean "I am" rather than "I have." I don't like it any more than you do, but nobody consulted me when they made the language.



sueño = sleepy/dream
sueno = I sound/ring (1st person of sonar - "to sound/ring")

The "swiggly thing" is important to the meaning as well as the pronounciation. In Spanish "ñ" and "n" are different letters.

============================
The verb "tener" and 1st person present "tengo" are often translated as "to have" and "I have" but they are related to the English adjective "tender". The older English meaning of "being physically sensitive" is important, not the newer one of "being romantically sensitive". So the phrase "tengo sueño" translates literally as "I have sleepy" but it means "I feel sleepy". "Tengo frio" translates literally to "I feel cold".

Tener does not always translate as "to feel" but it usually implies either an intimate or tactile relationship between the the holder and the item. If you want to translate "to have" but the relationship between the holder and the object is more distant, you would probably use "poseer" or "to possess".

Once again it is an artifact of English to say "I am" for a lot of subtle different meanings.

In the following cases it is easier to translate "tener" to English verb "to be" or "to feel"
Usted tiene suerte. — “You are lucky.” (literally: “You have luck.”)
¿Quién tiene razón? — “Who is right?” (literally: "Who has reason?")
Tenemos hambre. — “We are hungry.” (literally: “We feel hunger.”)
Tiene tres metros de ancho. — “It is three metres wide.”
Tengo veinte años. — “I am twenty years (old).”
Tengo frío. — “I feel cold.”

In the following cases it is easier to translate "tener" to English verb "to have". Notice that there is an intimate or a tactile connection to the thing you have. More than just possession is implied.
Ella tiene seis hermanos. — “She has six brothers.”
Tengo una pluma. — “I have a pen.”
¡Ten cuidado! — “Be careful!” (literally: “Have care!”)
Ten esto. — “Hold this.”
Este tarro tiene las cenizas. — “This jar contains the ashes.”
Él tiene mucho cariño para ella. — “He feels much admiration for her.”
Eso nos tiene lastimos. — “That makes us sad.”
allenwalker
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May 23rd, 2011 at 1:23:23 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I like her idea. Personally I have trouble with everything except the present tense. Not that I know most exceptions to the general rules for the present tense. What I do is make my best effort in the present tense and then point backwards for the past tense, and forward for future.



Despite growing up in San Antonio and two years of college-level Spanish, I'm limited to the present tense. Most bilinguals here know English as well as I do, but at times I try to use Spanish. Phrases like "Yesterday I go to the store..." are met with mild smirks, but understanding. An interview I heard yesterday on NPR discussed the book Globish: How the English Language Became the World's Language (which is a year old now) that indicated that the use of a subset of English provides a bridge between speakers that don't share a common language, and that American English idioms, allusions, etc., are not used (or understood) in such exchanges. Seems similar to a pendejo Gringo like me using only the present tense - still gets the point across thanks to the knowledge of the listener.
Wizard
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May 23rd, 2011 at 2:19:04 PM permalink
Quote: allenwalker

Seems similar to a pendejo Gringo like me using only the present tense



I thought that pendejo was a pretty strong slang word meaning idiot. Personally, I prefer the milder tontico. I welcome comments from the usual experts.
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pacomartin
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May 23rd, 2011 at 2:30:29 PM permalink
Quote: allenwalker

An interview I heard yesterday on NPR discussed the book Globish: How the English Language Became the World's Language (which is a year old now) that indicated that the use of a subset of English provides a bridge between speakers that don't share a common language, and that American English idioms, allusions, etc., are not used (or understood) in such exchanges.



There is a couple of kinds of subsets of English circulating. Possibly the best known is Voice of America English which uses a very small vocabulary of about 1500 words.

But BASIC English has just 850 words (with another 150 reserved for technical area). That constructed language was the basis for the idea of Newspeak in the novel 1984.

E-Prime requires the writer not to use the verb "to be" or any of it's conjugations (am, are, is, was, were, being).

Then there are just modern simplified American English, like the Good News translation of the bible.

First four verses of Genesis:
King James Version (1611) BASIC English (1940's) E-Prime (1960's) Good News Bible (1976)
In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. At the first God made the heaven and the earth. In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. In the beginning, when God created the universe,
And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And the earth was waste and without form; and it was dark on the face of the deep: and the Spirit of God was moving on the face of the waters. The earth appeared formless and void, and darkness covered over the surface of the deep,And the Spirit of God moved over the surface of the waters. the earth was formless and desolate. The raging ocean that covered everything was engulfed in total darkness, and the Spirit of God was moving over the water.
And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. Then God said, "Let light come"; and light came. Then God commanded, "Let there be light" - and light appeared.
And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness, And God, looking on the light, saw that it was good: and God made a division between the light and the dark, God saw that the light appeared good; and God separated the light from the darkness, God was pleased with what he saw. Then he separated the light from the darkness,

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