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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 24th, 2011 at 8:45:16 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You've managed to use I word I dind't know.



Real Academia Española ©: ábrego. (Del lat. afrĭcus). m. Viento templado y húmedo del sudoeste, que trae las lluvias.

It seems to be a word from Spain, and not common in Latin America. The word is not in "RAE Diccionario panhispánico de dudas". It is a street in Santa Barbara.

It is a surname in Mexico, one shared by a popular weather girl
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 24th, 2011 at 9:13:36 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

It is a surname in Mexico, one shared by a popular weather girl.



Los pechos son hermosos. corrected, thx Nareed

Why is it that ALL weather girls on Spanish television seem absolutely gorgeous? What happens to all the male, and average-looking female, meteorologists south of the border?
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 24th, 2011 at 10:12:59 AM permalink

Well, this Greek weather girl is pretty as well. I mean you can get weather predictions from a teletype machine. Why not?
Doc
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May 24th, 2011 at 10:59:13 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Why is it that ALL weather girls on Spanish television seem absolutely gorgeous?


In the '60s, pop radio stations frequently gave 15-seconds-or-so weather reports. The widely-used term for these was "weather check". One radio station in the Tampa/St. Pete area had the announcements made in a high-pitched, female, baby-doll voice. They referred to her as their "weather chick". Today, that kind of nickname would probably be considered too non-PC for regular use on an Anglo station, but it seems that Spanish TV may lean the other way. I don't speak any Spanish, so I don't watch those stations, but I have caught glimpses of a few Latino soaps while channel surfing. My impression is that they try to have the action hotter than on the Anglo soaps.
Wizard
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May 25th, 2011 at 7:14:33 AM permalink
Fecha: 25 de Mayo
Palabra del día: repugnante


In honor of the Wizard of Vegas challenge, the word of the day is REPUGNANTE. You can probably guess correctly what it means. Yes, it means disgusting, repugnant, repulsive, loathsome. Take you pick.

Let's have an ejemplo.

Comiendo cien McPiezas de pollo es repugnante. = Eating one hundred McPieces of chicken is disgusting.

I'm far from certain this is a good translation, and will await Nareed's corrections. In particular I have doubts about:

1. Should I use comer instead of comiendo? It seems to me in other cases when you're making a general statement about nobody in particular that you don't conjugate the verb. Still, going word by word, comiendo seems right for eatING.

2. Putting the Mc in front of Piezas was a joke, please don't deduct points for that. It should be noted that the word for "nugget" (like a gold nugget) in Spanish is pepita. However, I'm pretty sure the McDonalds in Mexico call the McNuggets piezas (pieces).
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Nareed
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May 25th, 2011 at 7:24:59 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

1. Should I use comer instead of comiendo? It seems to me in other cases when you're making a general statement about nobody in particular that you don't conjugate the verb. Still, going word by word, comiendo seems right for eatING.



Yes. It should be "comer 100...." etc.

Quote:

2. Putting the Mc in front of Piezas was a joke, please don't deduct points for that. It should be noted that the word for "nugget" (like a gold nugget) in Spanish is pepita. However, I'm pretty sure the McDonalds in Mexico call the McNuggets piezas (pieces).



Actually in Mexico McDonalds calls them McNuggets. Other joints have their own names, but few translate them to Spanish. At the supermarket you can buy frozen "nuggets de pollo" of several brands, including local ones like Bachoco.

The pronunciation changes to something like noogets, though, and sometimes the word si spelled "nuguets."

"Pepita" is a good literal translation, Indeed a gold nugget in spanish is a "pepita de oro." But pepita is also the word for pumpkin seeds and other similar snack seeds like sunflower. Had McDonalds tried to translate that menu item, it might have flopped.

You could search for "McDonalds Mexico" and access the site and view the menu in Spanish. You'll find the Big mac here is called "Big Mac," too, or however that's spelled.
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Nareed
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May 25th, 2011 at 7:31:14 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Los pechos son hermoso.



You missed the plural on the adjective., "los pechos son hermosos"

But that means "the breasts are beautiful." Since you mean a particular person, you should say "sus pechos...2 meaning "her breasts..."
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Wizard
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Wizard
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May 25th, 2011 at 7:46:43 AM permalink
Thanks for the corrections.

I did check out the McDonalds Mexico web site and they indeed call them McNuggets. They don't even put chicken or pollo with it. How would somebody unfamiliar with the menu know what it is a nugget of?

As a nod to Pulp Fiction, Mexico calls a Quarter Pounder a Quarto de Libra = quarter of a pound. However, as we all learned from Samuel L. Jackson, in France they call a Quarter Pounder a "Royale with Cheese." I think they actually call it a Royal Cheese. I'm not sure if they use the English words or if this is translated from French. My question is why does Mexico use the word for pound and France doesn't? Mexico is on the metric system too.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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May 25th, 2011 at 7:53:11 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

As a nod to Pulp Fiction, Mexico calls a Quarter Pounder a Quarto de Libra = quarter of a pound.
[snip!]
My question is why does Mexico use the word for pound and France doesn't? Mexico is on the metric system too.



"Cuarto de libra."

Many products are sold in Imperial units. Paint is typically sold by the gallon, for example, and I think screws and nails are sized in fractions of an inch. Three ring binders, which we use up like toilet paper at the office, are sized in inches, too.

I've no idea why. Almost everything is sold in metric units.
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Wizard
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May 25th, 2011 at 7:54:09 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You missed the plural on the adjective., "los pechos son hermosos." But that means "the breasts are beautiful."



Thanks for the corrections on that. Eventually I'll compose a sentence in Spanish with no errors.

The guy who cleans my piscina (swimming pool) says that hermoso also means big. He said if you called a woman hermoso should would be insulted, because it would be calling her fat. However, I can't find that usage of hermoso in my Spanish dictionary. I asked him about Hermosa Beach, California. He said they call it that because it is a BIG beach. In case you're wondering, he is from Nicaragua. That is why I chose hermoso for my comment on Paco's picture. Is there any truth to his usage of the word?

By the way, I also asked him why some people call a swimming pool an alberca. He said they only do that in Mexico, and it means any kind of container of water, even a pothole on the street. True or false?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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