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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 3rd, 2011 at 10:43:43 PM permalink
Quote: HotBlonde

Ok, Wizard, I have a question for you. It may seem easy at first glance, but how does the Spanish word "hombre" translate in English?Ad please, don't anyone help him out.


I let the Wizard answer first, but as far as I know it just means man. It is related to the Latin word homo from which we also get humus, so there is the idea that man comes from the earth. Latin nouns were inflected so homo, was also hominem, as well as humus.


Pereza - Todo
HotBlonde
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June 3rd, 2011 at 11:21:25 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It just means "man" as far as I know. I suspect this is a trick question.

Well, I could be wrong, but I was told it means "brother", "shoulder" and "hat".
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benbakdoff
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June 4th, 2011 at 4:39:26 AM permalink
Quote: HotBlonde

Well, I could be wrong, but I was told it means "brother", "shoulder" and "hat".



Hombro is shoulder and hermano is brother. There's nothing close to hat that I am aware of.

As in English, a lot of words sound alike until you see them written.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 4th, 2011 at 5:25:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Mrs. Howell es la pereza de la isla. Ella nunca ayudó con nada, y todo el mundo lo sabe. = Mrs. Howell is the sloth of the island. She never helped with anything, and everybody knows it.



You keep describing people with a noun, after indicating the related adjective. In this case it should read "Mrs. Howell es la peresoza..."
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Nareed
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June 4th, 2011 at 5:28:45 AM permalink
Quote: HotBlonde

Well, I could be wrong, but I was told it means "brother", "shoulder" and "hat".



Wat Ben said.

But "Cola" means tail, buttocks, a line of people, glue, a kind of nut, and it's a generic name for coke.
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Wizard
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Wizard 
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June 4th, 2011 at 6:31:30 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You keep describing people with a noun, after indicating the related adjective. In this case it should read "Mrs. Howell es la peresoza..."



Wouldn't that be saying "Mrs. Howell is the slothful"?

As a reminder, here is what I wrote, "Mrs. Howell es la pereza de la isla. " I thought pereza is sloth, and peresoza/peresozo is slothful.
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Nareed
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June 4th, 2011 at 6:40:32 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Wouldn't that be saying "Mrs. Howell is the slothful"?



No. Let's go back to the earlier word, greed.

When you said "Mr. Howell es la codicia...." You said "Mr. Howell is the greed..." What you means is "Mr. Howell is the greedy...." therefore "Mr. Howell es el codicioso..."

Codicia and pereza are nouns. Codiociosa y peresoza are adjectives. There's some confusion with the latter because the animal, sloth, is anmed "peresozo" in Spanish.

BTW Codicia also is the root of a slang expression, "codo," meaning a cheap person. It also means elbow.
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Wizard
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June 4th, 2011 at 7:01:05 AM permalink
Okay, thanks for the correction. I was trying to use sloth in a way like "she is the pride of the family." It is confusing because in English the animal is the same as the word sloth, which is as I think it should be.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 4th, 2011 at 7:55:17 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Okay, thanks for the correction. I was trying to use sloth in a way like "she is the pride of the family." It is confusing because in English the animal is the same as the word sloth, which is as I think it should be.



Linguists call changing the part of speech of a word (i.e. noun to adjective) without any change of spelling, by the technical term of conversion.

Conversion is particularly common in English because the basic form of nouns and verbs is identical in many cases. It is usually impossible in languages with grammatical genders, declensions or conjugations .
Wizard
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June 4th, 2011 at 11:11:31 PM permalink
Fecha: 5 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Ira


Today's word is ira, which means wrath. Related words might be furor = fury/rage, or rabia = rage. Ira is also a name in some places. I knew a female Ira from Israel. It must be tough for her visiting Spanish speaking countries.

Time for an ejemplo.

El Skipper muestra su ira golpeando Gilligan con su sombrero . = The Skipper shows wrath by hitting gilligan with his hat.

' rel='nofollow' target='_blank'>http://www.peoplequiz.com/images/quizzes/The-Skipper.jpg-4492.jpg]

Sorry, Nareed, but out of respect I have to stick with "Skipper" in both the English and Spanish. As I wrote in the entry for gula (gluttony), I think Skipper is more of a name than a title, and as such, I think translating it would lose its charm.

Let's look at some of the other words in that sentence.

muestra = in this context it means "shows."
su = his. "Google translate" used la and el, instead for words preceding ira and sombero, but if that is right, then I don't see why.
golpeando = hitting. The infinitive is golpear. To most "ar" verbs, the English "ing" is equivalent to the Spanish "ando."
sombrero = Everyone knows that means hat. Way back in this thread Paco said it comes from the word sombra (shade). It doesn't look like that cap casts much of a shadow, but if there is a more appropriate word for the thing on his head, I'm all ears.

Has anyone figured out the trend yet? If not, there are still two more words left in the series.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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