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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 4th, 2011 at 11:51:48 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Palabra del día: Ira



The related English words are , of course, irate and ire from Latin "iratus".

The words "anger" and "angry" are not Latin in origin but comes from an Old Norse word. As I said in the past, Old English, and Old Norse derived words are a small fraction of the words in present day English, but they are a huge percentage of the words we actually use in everyday speech and writing. Almost always the Germanic word is the everyday word "I am so angry", while the latin derived word is used in more elevated speech, "These issues make me so irate".

Quote: Insult puzzle

There are three words in the English language that end in "-gry". Two of them are angry and hungry. Everyone know the third. If you are too stupid to remember the third word on your own, then google the answer.

Nareed
Nareed
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June 5th, 2011 at 6:07:26 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

El Skipper que muestra su ira golpeando Gilligan con su sombrero . = The Skipper shows wrath by hitting gilligan with his hat.



The word "que" is superfluous. The way you wrote it translates as "The skipper who shows his anger by...."

Quote:

muestra = a sign of something.



Muestra in this context means "shows."


Quote:

Has anyone figured out the trend yet? If not, there are still two more words left in the series.



No, sorry. I'm not Catholic. :P
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Doc
Doc
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June 5th, 2011 at 8:29:28 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Almost always the Germanic word is the everyday word ..., while the latin derived word is used in more elevated speech....


Posts I read this morning seem to keep reminding me of things. In this case, it is an expression I cited (with an explanation) last fall:

"Avoid Latin derivatives. Use brief, terse, Anglo-Saxon monosyllables."
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 5th, 2011 at 11:05:56 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

"Avoid Latin derivatives. Use brief, terse, Anglo-Saxon monosyllables."



Thanks Doc, I never heard that before.


English derive (Spanish infinitive derivar), literally from Latin to de (away) + rivus (a stream). Or to draw away from a river.

In a similar manner a rival is someone who wants to share your river.
teddys
teddys
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June 5th, 2011 at 3:12:38 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

"Avoid Latin derivatives. Use brief, terse, Anglo-Saxon monosyllables."



I believe that was from Ernest Hemingway's Kansas City Star stylebook?

(EvenBob, any confirmation on that?)
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
Doc
Doc
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June 5th, 2011 at 3:18:17 PM permalink
Quote: teddys

I believe that was from Ernest Hemingway's Kansas City Star stylebook?


I'm not well-read on Hemingway. Was he big-time into sarcasm? That's what the Latin-derivatives admonition is all about.
Wizard
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Wizard
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June 6th, 2011 at 12:02:11 AM permalink
Fecha: 6 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Envidiar


Today's word is envidiar, which is a verb meaning to be envious. Here are some related words:

envidia = envy, as a noun
envidioso = envious
celoso = jealous

Por supsuesto (of course), envious and jealous are practically interchangeable.

Tiempo para ver un ejemplo = Time to see an example.



Mary Ann tiene envidiosa de la belleza de Ginger. = Mary Ann is envious of Ginger's beauty. corrected, thx Nareed

p.s. PM me if you see where I'm going with tomorrow's word. Nareed, I already know you know. I just want to know who is paying attention.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
EvenBob
EvenBob
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June 6th, 2011 at 12:52:14 AM permalink

/q]

Remember, Dawn Wells was the only member of the cast that had residuals written into her contract and she's made millions from it. Gilligan is always being shown somewhere in the world 24/7 for the last 45 years.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
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June 6th, 2011 at 2:07:00 AM permalink
I think I watched a grand total of two episodes of Gilligan's Island. I saw some tv show wherein a man-on-the-street asked passersby to sing the intro song and many were able to do it. I believe people used to call or write various coast guard units urging rescue efforts be made, perhaps on behalf of a camera crew and live audience that they thought were lost also.

Residuals. Smart girl. (Smart lawyer, probably).
Nareed
Nareed
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June 6th, 2011 at 5:24:56 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Mary Ann está envidioso de la belleza de Ginger. = Mary Ann is envious of Ginger's beauty.



There are two problems here. One is that while your example is techincally along the right lines, no one uses that word that way. A more apropriate example would be "Mary Ann tiene envidia de la belleza de Ginger."

The second is your perennial problem figuring out the gender in nouns and other words. It should be "envidiosA"


Quote:

p.s. PM me if you see where I'm going with tomorrow's word. Nareed, I already know you know. I just want to know who is paying attention.



I seriously don't know what's tomorrow's word. I suppose I could figure it out, or look it up, but I can't take the litany seriously.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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