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konceptum
konceptum
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June 7th, 2011 at 12:22:33 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

but neither do I know why "kicking the bucket" means to die.


Hogs were slaughtered by hanging them from a beam, called a bucket at the time. In their death throes, their feet would kick the bucket.
Wizard
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June 7th, 2011 at 6:59:30 AM permalink
Fecha: 7 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Orgullo


Today we wrap up our coverage of the Seven Deadly Sins. Congratulations to Doc and Paco for figuring it out, although I think Doc got it after two strikes. Today's final sin, orgullo means pride. Here are some related words:

Soberbia = Also means pride. Paco said by PM earlier, "While they both technically translate as pride, soberbia sometimes implies arrogance while orgullo is more neutral."
Orgulloso = Prideful.
Vanidad = Vanity

Ejemplo time.



El profesor está lleno de orgullo. Él siempre está presumiendo lo listo que es. = The professor is full of pride. He is always showing off how smart he is.

Here are some other vocab words in there:

lleno = full
siempre = always
presumiendo = past tense "he/she/Ud." form of presumir = show off
listo = smart.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 7th, 2011 at 7:30:14 AM permalink
The seven deadly sins idea is older than the English, Spanish , French, or Italian languages. Sometimes attributed to Thomas Aquinas in the middle ages, he actually was writing about a concept nearly a thousand years old. But he did a lot to solidify Catholic thinking about levels of sin. Because the sins were originally written in Latin, there is some discrepancy in the modern words used to translate them (in Spanish or English or French).

pride superiority greed avarice lust envy gluttony wrath ire sloth laziness English Seven deadly sins
S A L I G I A Acronym
superbia avaritia luxuria invidia gula ira acedia Latin septem peccata mortalia
superbia avarizia lussuria invidia gola ira accidia  Italian sette vizi capitali 
soberbia avaricia lujuria envidia gula ira pereza Spanish Los siete pecados mortales
l'orgueil l'avarice la luxure l'envie la gourmandise la colère la paresse French les sept péchés capitaux


greedy is Anglo Saxon in origin, while avarice is derived from Latin
pride is Anglo Saxon in origin, while vanity and superior are derived from Latin
sloth is Anglo Saxon in origin, acedia is a very rarely used English word, "lazy" (16th century) is of indeterminate origin

While “pride” is often thought of as a virtue, “superiority” is almost always implies haughtiness or arrogance and is considered a sin.
In older proverbs like “pride goes before a fall” the word pride refers to the “first sin” of Lucifer in thinking he was as great as God and it is definitely a sin. In English “vanity” is often used almost universally as a negative adjective.

Orgullo is a newer word than “soberbia” in Spanish, and it is derived from a Catalan word. Many people use it for the “good pride”, but the two words are not used consistently in that manner. (See Real Academia Española definitions).

orgullo. (Del Catalan orgull) m.
Arrogancia, vanidad, exceso de estimación propia, que a veces es disimulable por nacer de causas nobles y virtuosas.

soberbia. (Del Latin superbĭa).
1. f. Altivez y apetito desordenado de ser preferido a otros.
2. f. Satisfacción y envanecimiento por la contemplación de las propias prendas con menosprecio de los demás.
3. f. Especialmente hablando de los edificios, exceso en la magnificencia, suntuosidad o pompa.
4. f. Cólera e ira expresadas con acciones descompuestas o palabras altivas e injuriosas.
5. f. ant. Palabra o acción injuriosa.

En general es definida como “amor desordenado de sí mismo”. Según Santo Tomás la soberbia es “un apetito desordenado de la propia excelencia”


Wizard
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Wizard
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June 7th, 2011 at 8:18:38 AM permalink
Thanks Paco for the in-depth coverage on the Seven Deadly Sins. Interesting to note that mention of such a list is nowhere in the bible.

You may have noticed I used an example from Gilligan's Island for each sin. I have to confess this was not an original idea, but taken from the Seven Deadly Sins of Gilligan's Island Theory. If you're too perezoso to click on the link, it suggests that everyone except Gilligan represents one of the seven sins, except the Skipper represents two. Who is missing?



As the theory states, Gilligan is the devil. Notice how it is always Gilligan who screws up every rescue attempt, keeping them on the island, to suffer for their sins.

I think comparisons could also easily be made to Lost. Every major character had some sort of character flaw to work through. Without the distractions of the outside world, they were forced to deal with their inner demons. Meanwhile Jacob played the role of Gilligan, messing with everybody's head; keeping them all on the island one way or another.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Doc
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June 7th, 2011 at 8:45:17 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Interesting to note that mention of such a list is nowhere in the bible.


In my PM's to you yesterday (trying to get the wording and the exact sin correct), I mentioned the Wikipedia article on this. They claim that it started in the Bible with a very different list:

Quote: Wikipedia

In the Book of Proverbs (Mishlai), King Solomon stated that the Lord specifically regards "six things the Lord hateth, and the seventh His soul detesteth." namely:

A proud look.
A lying tongue.
Hands that shed innocent blood.
A heart that devises wicked plots.
Feet that are swift to run into mischief.
A deceitful witness that uttereth lies.
Him that soweth discord among brethren.

While there are seven of them, this list is considerably different from the traditional one, with only pride clearly being in both lists.


They also say that the list grew to eight before dropping back to seven.

I also noted yesterday that, like Nareed, I am not Catholic -- I can't keep up with what the Bible actually says, much less all of the stuff the popes and their councils make up.
pacomartin
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June 7th, 2011 at 9:03:22 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

As the theory states, Gilligan is the devil. Notice how it is always Gilligan who screws up every rescue attempt, keeping them on the island, to suffer for their sins.




I like the theory. I wonder if Sherwood Schwartz continued the theme with his next TV series, the Brady Bunch. I guess you have a Devil and God to make 9 characters.

It certainly fits Jean Paul Sartre's existential theory that "hell is being trapped with people" for the rest of eternity. If you ever see a picture of stage with three good looking people in it (2 women and a man) looking very upset, it is probably "No Exit" (written in 1944) where the damned are condemned to hell being forced to sit in a small room, and alternately try to seduce each other, to talk with one another, to tell their life story, to justify their actions, and to torture each other.
Wizard
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June 7th, 2011 at 9:04:56 AM permalink
Quote: Proverbs 6: 16-19


16 These six things doth the LORD hate: yea, seven are an abomination unto him:
17 A proud look, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood,
18 An heart that deviseth wicked imaginations, feet that be swift in running to mischief,
19 A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren.



It makes you wonder which one is the one that god hated, but didn't rise to the level of being an abomination.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
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June 7th, 2011 at 9:07:32 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

...it is probably "No Exit" (written in 1944) where the damned are condemned to hell being forced to sit in a small room, and alternately try to seduce each other, to talk with one another, to tell their life story, to justify their actions, and to torture each other.



Sounds like any given Samuel Beckett play.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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June 7th, 2011 at 9:22:45 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

I am not Catholic -- I can't keep up with what the Bible actually says, much less all of the stuff the popes and their councils make up.


Well you are certainly not Catholic.

The Spanish speaking people are either Catholic, or Catholicism is a big part of their culture. Uruguay is widely considered the most secular nation in Western Hemisphere, but they are an exception. The virgin of Guadalupe is still one of the strongest symbols of Mexico in the country.

Wizard
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June 7th, 2011 at 9:35:32 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The virgin of Guadalupe is still one of the strongest symbols of Mexico in the country.



I have yet to get a straight answer to the question of whether the Virgin of Guadalupe is the same person as the Virgin Mary.

My weekly house cleaner is named Lupe. I assumed that was short for Guadalupe, which was enough credentials for me to pester her with questions about the virgin of Guadalupe. She said they were indeed the same person, but I wasn't entirely convinced she knew what she was talking about.

Furthermore, why didn't they name Mexico City Guadalupe City instead?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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