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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 8th, 2011 at 5:35:20 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

It's simple, really. Any phrase starting with "tengo" and following with a feeling like hunger, cold, thirst, envy, etc, translates as "I'm cold, hungry, thirsty, wahtever." If tengo is followed by anything else, then it means "I have..."



Yes it is simple to go from Spanish to English. It is the other direction that can be difficult, because one word goes to multiple words.
Nareed
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June 8th, 2011 at 5:40:16 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Yes it is simple to go from Spanish to English. It is the other direction that can be difficult, because one word goes to multiple words.



The same thing happens in English. Otherwise there would be no puns or other kinds of wordplay.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 8th, 2011 at 6:00:41 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The same thing happens in English. Otherwise there would be no puns or other kinds of wordplay.



Generally, I find that Spanish is more specific than English. From what I understand that would be a true statement of any romance language. Spanish had fewer influences. A little Iberian, a little French, a little more arabic. English was formed from many languages. Norse, Anglo Saxon, Latin, Greek, and it borrows words freely from French, Italian, and Sanskrit as well as native American as well as other languages.

We are both in agreement that tengo frío is not an idiomatic expression. However, it is often taught that way.

Quote: Study Spanish


From Idiomatic Expressions with "tener"
Spanish also has many idiomatic expressions. Although their literal translations sound odd to English speakers, they sound perfectly natural to native speakers.
...
Many other expressions using tener express physical sensations:
tener frío to be cold
tener calor to be hot
tener hambre to be hungry

Wizard
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June 9th, 2011 at 8:25:35 AM permalink
Fecha: 9 de Junio, 2011
Fecha del día: Nevada


For the next four days we'll look at the four states with Spanish names. What better state to start with than Nevada (adj.), which means snowfall, snowstorm, snow-covered, or snowy. Just about any adjective associated with snow. Related words are:

Nevar (verb) = To snow
Nieve (noun) = Snow

For ejemplo time, let's look at some lyrics to my second favorite Christmas song, Winter Wonderland. The translation is from the video' rel='nofollow' target='_blank'>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-v1BpnNFkac]video by Selena Gomez..

La nieve del camino esta brillando. = In the lane snow is glistening.

En la pradera podemos hacare un muñeco de nieve = In the meadow we can build a snowman.

I'm not a fan of Selena's version of the song, as she removed eight lines, and repeated eight previous ones instead. One of the missing lines is this one:

Cuando nieva, ¿no es emocionante? = When it snows, ain't it thrilling?

I also would have used vega for meadow, but call me biased. As mentioned yesterday, Vegas is Spanish for meadows, but paredas seems to be the preferred synonym.

For more Winter Wonterland in June, enjoy my favorite cover by Darlene Love.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 9th, 2011 at 12:35:17 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Nieve (noun) = Snow


While it does seem as if every Latin word was absorbed into the English language, the Wizard has found two that became English words which didn't stick.

neve is a "field of granular snow" in English, but it either archaic or so rare that I have never heard it.

In an earlier post we had the English word acedia which came from the Latin word acedia which formed the Spanish word pereza . In English "lazy" has won out.

These two trivia questions should be way too easy for Nareed. Let someone else try them.

TRIVIA #1: The Wizard mentions "pradera" for meadow, which gave rise to the name of what famous art museum in Madrid? No googling.
TRIVIA #2: The synonym "vega" for meadow is Iberian in origin (or pre the Roman conquest of Spain). The word Ojalá is a Spanish word Arabic in origin, and originally came from By Allah!. What is the most famous Spanish word that is Arabic in origin that you would hear in a bullfight?
Nareed
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June 9th, 2011 at 1:07:49 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I also would have used vega for meadow, but call me biased. As mentioned yesterday, Vegas is Spanish for meadows, but paredas seems to be the preferred synonym.



You enarly made it without an error, or without my noticing it.

pRADERAs

Sorry. Now go stand in the corner :P

I think I've mentioned no one uses the word vega in Spanish.

It is a surname. There's Paz Vega, and I think Zorro's name was Diego de la Vega. Other than that, there's the star Vega and nothing more.
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Nareed
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June 9th, 2011 at 1:13:46 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

These two trivia questions should be way too easy for Nareed. Let someone else try them.



Easy. You chose two subjects I know little about.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 9th, 2011 at 1:48:53 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I think I've mentioned no one uses the word vega in Spanish.



Yes, but at least it was in your dictionary. That should make it fair game. Anyway, in case I was too obsequious, I was joking, wanting to bring back the word vegas for meadows. As one who has to live in Las Vegas, I think I can be forgiven for that. So I don't think I should have to stand in the corner for that one, although I owe you plenty of time for other faltas in el pasado. I respectfully ask for a reconsideration.

Quote: pacomartin

TRIVIA #1: The Wizard mentions "pradera" for meadow, which gave rise to the name of what famous art museum in Madrid? No googling.
TRIVIA #2: What is the most famous Spanish word that is Arabic in origin that you would hear in a bullfight?



#1 If forced to guess I'll say Prada. The name of the purses have to come from somewhere.
#2 ¡Ole!
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 9th, 2011 at 1:54:35 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

There's Paz Vega. Other than that, there's the star Vega and nothing more.


I guess that Vega is like the English word "prithee" which has not been published in a new story since the late 19th century.

I like Paz Vega


But the movie Spanglish had some serious credibility problems.
(1) That a maid would look like Paz Vega
(2) If there was a maid that looked like Paz Vega, that any wife would hire her
(3) That she could have lived in the USA long enough to raise a teenage daughter and not know simple English phrases like "hello" and "goodbye"
(4) That the producers couldn't find a single Mexican actress to play an iconic Mexican role. They had to hire a Spanish actress.
Wizard
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June 9th, 2011 at 2:03:59 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

(2) If there was a maid that looked like Paz Vega, that any wife would hire her.



Agreed. Even if she is ugly that is no guarantee against her fooling around with the man of the house, as evidenced by Arnold. My requirement for housekeepers is they have to look good in a French maid's outfit.


Source: www.yandy.com.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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