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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 12th, 2011 at 6:55:31 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

So why was Texas named that? No clue.



Thanks for pinch hitting for me today. Actually, I wasn't planning to use Texas in my series of states with Spanish names. Here is what Wikipedia says about the name:

Quote: wikipedia

The name Texas derives from táyshaʔ, a word in the Caddoan language of the Hasinai, which means "friends" or "allies."



I had never heard of the "Caddoan" languages. Also from Wikipedia, here is the executive summary on that, "The Caddoan languages are a family of Native American languages. They are spoken by Native Americans in parts of the Great Plains of the central United States, from North Dakota south to Oklahoma." I wonder if it is even spoken in the Indian casinos.
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Nareed
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June 12th, 2011 at 7:22:47 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for pinch hitting for me today.



Well, that's what you get for being so nice :P

Quote:

Actually, I wasn't planning to use Texas in my series of states with Spanish names.



I wasn't, either. It just hit me while I was starting to post.

BTW in Spain they spell it Tejas. They also spell Mexico as Mejico, which given the pronunciation is how it should be.
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Wizard
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June 12th, 2011 at 9:17:42 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

BTW in Spain they spell it Tejas. They also spell Mexico as Mejico, which given the pronunciation is how it should be.



Que interesante. It seems to me you don't see the letter x in Spanish much. Even less so than in English. Would you agree?

One of the few Spanish words I do know is Tejano (Texan). I'm not sure where I picked it up. It is not a small frustration that Spanish is spoken significantly differently depending on Spanish speaking country, and I'm teaching myself from several different sources. So, if they spell Texas with an x in Mexico, how do they spell the word for somebody from Texas?
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Nareed
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June 12th, 2011 at 9:29:16 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Que interesante. It seems to me you don't seem the letter x in Spanish much. Even less so than in English. Would you agree?



Well, naturally not many words begin with X. But it's used in the prefix "ex" which gets attached to too many words.

The thing is in Mexican Spanish the letter X varies it's sound. Aside from being used as a J in Mexico, it's a an S in names like Xochimilco (a lake in Mex City), and as an SH in Xola (it's the name of a street, beyond that I don't know what it means).

Quote:

One of the few Spanish words I do know is Tejano (Texan). I'm not sure where I picked it up. It is not a small frustration that Spanish is spoken significantly differently depending on Spanish speaking country, and I'm teaching myself from several different sources. So, if they spell Texas with an x in Mexico, how do they spell the word for somebody from Texas?



Come to think of it, the correct spelling might be Tejas. As you might guess, you don't see the word often. I use an X when I write it, in the rare occasions I do, but if I try to recall how it's written in the press or in books, I can't say exactly.
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Wizard
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June 12th, 2011 at 10:08:17 PM permalink
Fecha: 13 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Florida


Today we wrap up our look at states with names of Spanish origin. The word for today is florida = florid. Much like montana, another easy one to remember. Here are some related words:

florid (adj.) = florid/floral. Yes, the same spelling in both idiomas (languages). I'll await Nareed's response to see whether there is any difference between florid and florida.
flor (noun) = flower.
floreceer (verb) = to flower.
floreo (noun) = flourish/idle talk.
florido (adj.) = the masculine form of florida, which would be used to describe a masculine noun.
florista (noun) = florist (female). Obviamente, use floristo for a male florist.

Ejemplo time.



La boda fue muy florida. = The wedding was very floral.
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pacomartin
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June 12th, 2011 at 11:04:10 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard


florid (adj.) = florid/floral. Yes, the same spelling in both idiomas (languages). I'll await Nareed's response to see whether there is any difference between florid and florida.



I'll jump in ahead of Nareed. There are relatively few adjectives in Spanish that end in a consonant. The adjective difícil and español are among of the most common. I can't think of an adjective that ends in the letter "d". The word "florid" is not in the RAE. Only florido/florida.
Wizard
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June 13th, 2011 at 4:36:33 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I'll jump in ahead of Nareed. There are relatively few adjectives in Spanish that end in a consonant. The adjective difícil and español are among of the most common. I can't think of an adjective that ends in the letter "d". The word "florid" is not in the RAE. Only florido/florida.



What about mal? Actually, I've always wondered when it is appropriate to use mal, when you also have malo and mala.

Getting back to florida, it is listed in spanishdict.com, as well as my hard copy of the Vox Compact Spanish and English Dictionary.
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pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 7:44:52 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard


What about mal? Actually, I've always wondered when it is appropriate to use mal, when you also have malo and mala.

Getting back to florida, it is listed in spanishdict.com, as well as my hard copy of the Vox Compact Spanish and English Dictionary.




Wizard, I said that there are relatively few adjectives that end in consonants. I didn't mean to imply that they are rarely used.

Mal is more "poor" or "poorly" and that malo/a is "bad".


When I use the spanishdict.com I get florid as an English word with the following translation into Spanish and definition.

florid
Florid
[ˈflɒrɪd]
adjetivo
1. florido(a) (style); colorado(a) (complexion)
Copyright © 2006 Chambers Harrap Publishers Limited

Florid [flo-rid]
adjetivo
1. Vivo, brillante; encarnado, de un rojo subido (face).
2. Embellecido con flores de retórica.
3. Sobrecargado de adornos.
4. Florido, lleno o adornado de flores.
5. Elegante, llamativo.
Velazquez® Spanish and English Dictionary. Copyright © 2007 by Velazquez® Press. All rights
Nareed
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:04:22 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

florido (adj.) = the masculine form of florida, which would be used to describe a masculine noun.
florista (noun) = florist (female). Obviamente, use floristo for a male florist.



Are you familiar with the expression "heads I win, tails you lose"? That's what nouns are doing to you.

In the case of "florista" gender for some reason doesn't apply. I don't know why. I recall my highschool Spanish teacher saying many other nouns have no gender, like doctor, presidente, ministro, piloto and others, but I don't recall if he explained why.

The adjective florida/florido does have a gender distinction. Go figure.
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Wizard
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:27:35 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

When I use the spanishdict.com I get florid as an English word with the following translation into Spanish and definition.

florid
Florid
[ˈflɒrɪd]
adjetivo
1. florido(a) (style); colorado(a) (complexion)



Interesting that colorado, our word of the day three days ago, should come up in our search for the meaning of florida. What a casualidad (coincidence).

So, if we say Ella tiene una complexión florida, does that mean "she has a reddish completion"?
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