Thread Rating:

pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 10th, 2011 at 11:31:07 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I also understand that rojo would be normal word for red in this context, but I'm trying to put colorado in the ejemplo somehow, and have it refer to the color, not the state.




Mole coloradito is a Oaxequeno dish made with red ancho chilies to give it it's distinctive coloring.


Coloradito comes from the same Latin word that we get the English word "color" from. The word got associated with dying wool, which was often done in reddish colors. My dictionary says "ruddy" is a possible translation. I would associate it more with the color red in soils and rock, as opposed to paint or ink.

There is an archaic English word "gules" pronounced GYOOLZ which was used in heraldry for the color red. It comes from the Latin word gula or throat, which seems an obvious reference to certain birds. While the word may have been common at one time, I know of no modern usage.

Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
June 11th, 2011 at 2:51:49 PM permalink
Fecha: 11 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Montana


Today we continue our look at states with Spanish names. The state for today is montana = mountainous. This is obviously going to be easy to remember. However, it seems that the more common word for mountainous is montañoso/a.

Another possibility is that they meant the name of the state to be mountain, which in Spanish is montaña. If somewhere along the line the tilde above the n got lost then it wouldn't be the first time that has happened north of the border. An example of this was mentioned in an earlier word of the day, sueño (dream). There is a street by that name is Isla Vista, California, but they omit the tilde above the n. The letter ñ gets no respect among us gringos.

Ejemplo time.



Suiza es un país montano = Switzerland is a mountainous country.

Per Nareed's correction, I changed montana to montano, because país is a masculine word.

My apologies in advance to Nareed for using an archaic word.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 11th, 2011 at 3:16:08 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Palabra del día: Montana



I was going to say that's not a Spanish word, but according to the dictionary it is. It means "Perteneciente o relativo al monte" "Pertaining or relative to a hill."

In that case, it's an extremely poor name for a mountainous state. for some reason lots of people who live near mountians are disdainful of hills <shrug>

Quote:

The letter ñ gets no respect among us gringos.



That's because the letter doesn't exist in English. The sound exists in many languages, but for some reason other languages don't have a specific letter for it.

Quote:

Suiza es un país montana = Switzerland is a mountainous country.



Going by the definition above that would be wrong. Besides the word is so obscure I can't say for certain whether it's right or not, even if Switzerland were known for hills rather than mountains. What I am sure is that you messed the gender again. País is a male noun, ergo the example, assuming it's right, should read "Suiza es un país montanO"

State is also a male noun in Spanish. So if you were to apply the example to the state, it would read "Monatna es un esatdo montano."

Any wonder I prefer English to my native language?



My apologies in advance to Nareed for using an archaic word.

Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
June 11th, 2011 at 3:51:38 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

It means "Perteneciente o relativo al monte" "Pertaining or relative to a hill."



Hmmm. spanishdict.com says montana means "mountainous." Not to say you're wrong, but that is where I got my definition. Per Paco's advice, I've been meaning to get a Spanish dictionary in Spanish. They are not easy to find in the U.S. -- time to put in an order at Amazon.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 11th, 2011 at 4:00:42 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hmmm. spanishdict.com says montana means "mountainous."



I checked it too. it does say that.


Quote:

Not to say you're wrong, but that is where I got my definition. Per Paco's advice, I've been meaning to get a Spanish dictionary in Spanish. They are not easy to find in the U.S. -- time to put in an order at Amazon.



I'm not claiming I'm right, but that the dictionary definition in Spanish is different. Just to make sure I checked another one. It gave out the definition as "adj. Del monte o relativo a él," which is consistent with the other definition I found.

Here are two links to Spanish dictionaries:

http://www.rae.es/rae.html

http://www.elmundo.es/diccionarios/
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 11th, 2011 at 4:07:16 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Any wonder I prefer English to my native language?



Nareed: Do you find that you use future conjugation ever?

My Oaxacan teacher said that Mexicans almost always use futuro perifrástico as in "Voy a comer asado el próximo domingo" instead of saying "Comeré asado el próximo domingo". I said that to someone and they got very upset that the teacher would say that. She said that the future is important to all Spanish dialects, and not just for Castillian Spanish.

I can't tell who is correct. While I was very impressed with their knowledge of grammer, the teachers in the institute, invariably worked two jobs while the other person who insisted the future was very important worked in a consulate.

If anyone is reading this blog, the futuro perifrástico or "paraphrased future" uses the present form of the verb "to go" with the word "a" and an "infinitive form". The second sentence uses a future conjugation.

Google translates both sentences as "I'll eat barbecue on Sunday" .

If you have anything to say about the importance of the other moods like conditional and subjunctive, I would like to hear them. I know that people use the imperitive all the time.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 11th, 2011 at 7:21:50 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Nareed: Do you find that you use future conjugation ever?



I don't keep track of how I speak.

Quote:

My Oaxacan teacher said that Mexicans almost always use futuro perifrástico as in "Voy a comer asado el próximo domingo" instead of saying "Comeré asado el próximo domingo". I said that to someone and they got very upset that the teacher would say that. She said that the future is important to all Spanish dialects, and not just for Castillian Spanish.



I don't think the future is any more important to the average Spanish speaker than it is to the average Swahili, Hindu, Russian, English, Polish, etc etc speaker.

Quote:

Google translates both sentences as "I'll eat barbecue on Sunday" .



Your first example translates literally as "I'm going to eat asado next Sunday."

There's no Spanish word for barbecue. Asado is difficult to translate. Typically it just means cooked meat. Perhaps in South America they use the word to mean a specific kind of dish.

Quote:

If you have anything to say about the importance of the other moods like conditional and subjunctive, I would like to hear them. I know that people use the imperitive all the time.



I did tell you I know virtually nothing about the formal rules of grammar in any language, right? Anyway, as I said above, I don't keep track of how I speak.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 12th, 2011 at 2:00:51 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I don't keep track of how I speak.



Granted. But which sentence sounds more natural?

(A) Voy a comer el pollo el próximo domingo.

(B) Comeré el pollo el próximo domingo.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 12th, 2011 at 4:22:32 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Granted.



Why do I have trouble believing that? ;)

Quote:

But which sentence sounds more natural?

(A) Voy a comer el pollo el próximo domingo.

(B) Comeré el pollo el próximo domingo.



The first one.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 12th, 2011 at 5:41:37 PM permalink
Fecha: 12 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Tejas


Since the Wizard has not posted a word for today, I decided to usurp his turn (with some malice), and to continue the theme.

Some current US states were once part of Mexico, and previously were owned by Spain. Of these, two don't seem to have Spanish names: Utah and Texas. Someone else can deal with Utah, but Texas is a Spanish word, so long as you pronounce it "Tejas," (keep in mind the sound of the letter J in Spanish).

Now, in Mexico the state's name is spelled "Texas" but pronounced "Tejas." Why? beats me. Perhaps Paco knows the why of the multiple phoneme use of the letter X in Mexico. It can sound like X, but often does duty for S, SH and the Spanish J.

Anyway, a teja is a curved pottery tile used to cover slanted roofs. It's purpose is to channel rainwater from the roof. I'm not sure, but I think the word can be translated as "shingles."

Another Spanish word for roof, BTW, is "tejado," even when not covered with tejas. The play "Fiddler on the Roof" is known in Spanish as "El Violinista en el Tejado."

So why was Texas named that? No clue.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

  • Jump to: