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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 3:42:53 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I had never heard of the "Caddoan" languages. Also from Wikipedia, here is the executive summary on that, "The Caddoan languages are a family of Native American languages. They are spoken by Native Americans in parts of the Great Plains of the central United States, from North Dakota south to Oklahoma." I wonder if it is even spoken in the Indian casinos.



I am not sure why you would think you would have heard of one of the indigenous languages? There were literally thousands of them, and most of them have either vanished or are in the process of vanishing. At some point it takes a huge amount of money to maintain a dying language. You have to fund radio stations, and television, plus schools for young people. Since many of them had no written language, you need to develop one. The wealthier countries can support languages like Gaelic and Welsh and even revive the dead ones like Cornish.

In Oaxaca they have Otomanguean family of languages. All of them are tonal, and many include whistling words. The most effective thing is to write songs with some verses in Spanish and some in Zapotec like El Feo.
teddys
teddys
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June 13th, 2011 at 7:40:51 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Texas trivia #2. Name the six flags over Texas.


1. Spain
2. Mexico
3. Republic of Texas
4. U.S.A.
~~~~~~~
Uhh......
5. France?
6. Britain?
Native American?
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 7:53:01 PM permalink
Quote: teddys

1. Spain
2. Mexico
3. Republic of Texas
4. U.S.A.
~~~~~~~
Uhh......
5. France?
6. Britain?
Native American?


Not British since their rule never extended more than a few hundred miles in from the coast. Native Americans did not have flags. You are missing a significant historical event.

And yes, the Republic of Texas did establish an embassy in London before it dissolved.
teddys
teddys
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:07:11 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Not British since their rule never extended more than a few hundred miles in from the coast. Native Americans did not have flags. You are missing a significant historical event.

Oops. Ah, yeah, C.S.A.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
Wizard
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Wizard 
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June 13th, 2011 at 11:37:36 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Native Americans did not have flags.



That was unfortunate for them. To Europe, no flag signified free land.
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Wizard
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Wizard 
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June 14th, 2011 at 6:20:48 AM permalink
Fecha: 14 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Punta


For the next five days or so let's take a look at Spanish slang. This is an area where Spanish teachers and books tend to shy away from, so take anything I say with a grain of sal (salt).

To get started, the word for today is punta. The primary legitimate meaning for punta is point. It can also mean a host of pointy things, like small nails, the tip of antlers, or the stub left after sawing off a branch from a log. (soucre: spanishdict.com). translate.google.com, says it means "tip." I assume that means the pointy end of something, not a propina (gratuity).

There seems to be some debate online about what the slang meaning is. A common translation is "bitch." Other sources say it means "whore." A related word I found is:

putañar = to have sex with a prostitute.

Ejemplo time.

¡Dame una cerveza, punta! = Give me a beer, bitch!

I'll leave it to Nareed and Paco to give us the insider's guide. I'm getting in way over my head.
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Nareed
Nareed
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June 14th, 2011 at 6:41:10 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

translate.google.com, says it means "tip." I assume that means the pointy end of something, not a propina (gratuity).



That's so.

Quote:

There seems to be some debate online about what the slang meaning is. A common translation is "bitch." Other sources say it means "whore." A related word I found is:

putañar = to have sex with a prostitute.

Ejemplo time.

¡Dame una cerveza, punta! = Give me a beer, bitch!



You have the wrongest word.

PuNta means tip, as you explained. It may also refer to the farthest point in a geographical area, such as a cape or a peninsula, as found in names like Punta del Este.

Puta, without the N, is a different word. It's not slang, it's a word for whore. It's regarded as an insult, too.

The reason some thing it means bitch is that the expression "hijo de puta," is equivalent to the English "son of a bitch." But while the intent of both phrases is the same, to insult a person and his mother in the same sentence, the literal meanings are different.
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Wizard
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June 14th, 2011 at 6:59:57 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

PuNta means tip, as you explained. It may also refer to the farthest point in a geographical area, such as a cape or a peninsula, as found in names like Punta del Este.

Puta, without the N, is a different word. It's not slang, it's a word for whore. It's regarded as an insult, too.

The reason some thing it means bitch is that the expression "hijo de puta," is equivalent to the English "son of a bitch." But while the intent of both phrases is the same, to insult a person and his mother in the same sentence, the literal meanings are different.



Hmmm. I did some more searching, and some sources agree with you. However, also consider these sources:

Quote: answers.reference.com


Q: What does Punta Mean in Spanish?
A: Punta is Spanish derogatory word for a woman's butt. It is usually a term used disrespectfully or as a curse word. Punta is not a good word to use if you plan to get on someones good side.


Source: answers.reference.com

Quote: answers.yahoo.com


Q: What does (punta) mean in spanish?
A: Punta means "b----" in Spanish.


Source: www.chacha.com
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Nareed
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June 14th, 2011 at 7:28:45 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hmmm. I did some more searching, and some sources agree with you. However, also consider these sources:



I've no idea whether somewhere in Latin America punta means a woman's posterior, but I've never heard of it.

As to the second reference, obviously they made the mistake of confusing puNta with puta. It's not as bad a confusing bit with bitch, but it's close.

You ought to be careful with internet sources. Remember a word that sounded like crab?
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 14th, 2011 at 7:42:19 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'm getting in way over my head.



I would have though everyone knew that word by now. The word may be nothing more obscure than an abbreviation for prostituta.

I am a little confused about callejera, built around the word "calle" which means street. This may be a culturally dependent word, which means different things in different Spanish speaking countries. Sometimes it seems to mean "streetwalker" and sometimes it seems to refer to a "street scene" with only benign meanings.


I also do not understand this photo of a seagull labelledputa gaviota. Gaviota is a seagull, but I am not sure why this photo has the extra word.

Another word that seems confusing is putañero which my slang dictionary defines as "pimp", but in other websites seems to be a "john".

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