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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:28:49 AM permalink
Nareed, what about the word florid with no vowel on the end? I think that is an English word only. What do you think?
Nareed
Nareed
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:33:23 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So, if we say Ella tiene una complexión florida, does that mean "she has a reddish completion"?



Maybe. Fact is I've never heard the word "florida" used in any other way but as a name for the state of Florida.
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Nareed
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:34:06 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Nareed, what about the word florid with no vowel on the end? I think that is an English word only. What do you think?



It's an English word.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:36:16 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard


Interesting that colorado, our word of the day three days ago, should come up in our search for the meaning of florida. What a casualidad (coincidence).

So, if we say Ella tiene una complexión florida, does that mean "she has a reddish completion"?



The etymology online dictionary says Sense of "ruddy" is first recorded 1640s. Meaning "profusely adorned, as with flowers," is from 1650s.

Personally , I would not normally associate the word florid with ruddy, but I can't argue with the dictionary. Your sentence would have to mean she has a reddish complexion, but I don't know if you would actually say that about a woman, or if it would be a compliment or an insult.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:43:16 AM permalink
You're both missing the term "rosy" from your discussion about comlpexion.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 13th, 2011 at 11:27:02 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You're both missing the term "rosy" from your discussion about comlpexion.



Reminds me of this exchange from Seinfeld, in which Jerry set up George on a blind date.

George: Is there a pinkish hue?
Jerry: A pinkish hue?
George: Yeah, a rosy glow.
Jerry: There's a hue. She's got great eyebrows; women kill to have her eyebrows.
George: Who cares about eyebrows?

Here is how Google translates it:

George: ¿Hay un tono rosado?
Jerry: ¿Un tono rosado?
George: Sí, un brillo rosado.
Jerry: Hay un matiz. Tiene las cejas grandes, las mujeres que matan a sus cejas.
George: ¿Quién se preocupa por las cejas?

Any difference between tono and mariz in Spanish?

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benbakdoff
benbakdoff
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June 13th, 2011 at 2:14:33 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Que interesante. It seems to me you don't seem the letter x in Spanish much. Even less so than in English. Would you agree?

One of the few Spanish words I do know is Tejano (Texan). I'm not sure where I picked it up. It is not a small frustration that Spanish is spoken significantly differently depending on Spanish speaking country, and I'm teaching myself from several different sources. So, if they spell Texas with an x in Mexico, how do they spell the word for somebody from Texas?



I've eaten some pretty good Tejano food which I think we know as Tex-Mex and Selena made Tejano music hugely popular during her very brief life.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 3:19:12 PM permalink
Quote: benbakdoff

I've eaten some pretty good Tejano food which I think we know as Tex-Mex and Selena made Tejano music hugely popular during her very brief life.



It is pretty inevitable that any loanword may have alternate spellings. Texas is a native american word, so it can be spelled either way. For instance, the French phrase chaise longue is spelled as what in English? The original meaning was "long chair", but even the meaning has been altered.

Texas trivia #1. What city and street has this plaque?



Texas trivia #2. Name the six flags over Texas.
toastcmu
toastcmu
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June 13th, 2011 at 3:24:13 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I had never heard of the "Caddoan" languages. Also from Wikipedia, here is the executive summary on that, "The Caddoan languages are a family of Native American languages.



The Caddo Indians were a "native" tribe in East Texas, if my 7th grade Texas history holds up. Also, they were the ones that bound planks of wood to their children's heads I believe... I forgot the name of that....

-B
Nareed
Nareed
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June 13th, 2011 at 3:34:11 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Texas trivia #1. What city and street has this plaque?



I'll claim half a credit: London.

BTW there was a reference to Texas today in the newspaper and it was spelled with an X. So that settles that. In mexican Spanish it's spelled "Texas" but pronounced "Tejas."
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