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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 9th, 2011 at 2:08:46 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

#1 If forced to guess I'll say Prada. The name of the purses have to come from somewhere.
#2 ¡Ole!



Prada - the Italian high fashion house was named after the founder Mario Prada. The museum is "The Prado".



The words that begin with al, in particular are all Arabic in origin.
alacrán (m.) scorpion
alcohol (m.) alcohol
albaricoque (m.) apricot
alfiler (m.) pin
algodón (m.) cotton
almacén (m.) store, warehouse, grocery
almanaque (m.) almanac
almíbar (m.) syrup
alquiler (m.) rent
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 9th, 2011 at 2:12:19 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

My requirement for housekeepers is they have to look good in a French maid's outfit.



What is relevant is what is your wife's requirement.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 9th, 2011 at 2:30:04 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

#1 If forced to guess I'll say Prada. The name of the purses have to come from somewhere.



Indeed. it comes from Italy.
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Nareed
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June 10th, 2011 at 8:17:43 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

(1) That a maid would look like Paz Vega



It's a movie. The maid will look like the box office expectations demand.

Quote:

(2) If there was a maid that looked like Paz Vega, that any wife would hire her



Again. it's a movie. the wife will do in the plot what the box office expectations demand.

Quote:

(3) That she could have lived in the USA long enough to raise a teenage daughter and not know simple English phrases like "hello" and "goodbye"



Did I mention it's a movie?

Quote:

(4) That the producers couldn't find a single Mexican actress to play an iconic Mexican role. They had to hire a Spanish actress.



Recently on CSI NY they had a Spaniard forensic investigator allegedly from Barcelona. I don't know who the actor was, but his accent was more nearly Central/northern South American than anything else. It dind't even come close to a Spaniard accent by at least, oh, 10,000 kilometers. Likewise the Madrilian girlfriend of the victim.

A Hollywood movie will diferentiate between a Britton, an English man, an Irish man, a Scotsman, a Canadian, an Australian, a Hindu, and an American. But when it comes to non-English speaking foreigners, all black cats are alike in the dark.

Lest you think such attitudes is particular to America, consider former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori. He's of Japanese descent, but he was widely known in Peru as "El Chino," meaning "the chinese man." I can cite many other examples, particularly involving Asians and blacks, but I don't think that's necessary.

So, it's a movie, right?

BTW Antonio Banderas did a good job ditching the Spaniard accent in the Zorro movies. But the top prize for adopting a different accent goes to Hugh Laurie as House.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 10th, 2011 at 8:52:21 AM permalink
Fecha: 10 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Colorado


Today we continue our look at states with Spanish names. The state for today is Colorado = red/reddish. I suspect that the etymology is some kind of juxtaposition of color (color) and rojo (red). Paco is the undisputed expert on word origins around here, so I'll leave it to him to explain that. Never once have I heard of anyone use the word Colorado to mean red. Then again, it isn't like I listen to people speaking Spanish all day.

I'll leave it up to Nareed to address whether colorado has joined the vegas (meadows) club of words that may be in the dictionary, but nobody actually says any longer, at least in the context of its original meaning.

I do have to wonder where this red part of Colorado is. East of the Rockies it is mostly amarillo
(yellow), from the endless wheat fields. The Rockies and points west are of course muy verde (very green). Then again, only a small portion of Nevada ever gets much snow, and yet the name of the state means snow covered. Go figure.

Ejemplo time.



Beyonce se ve preciosa en colorado = Beyonce looks gorgeous in red. Corrected, thx Nareed
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Nareed
Nareed
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June 10th, 2011 at 9:02:51 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'll leave it up to Nareed to address whether colorado has joined the vegas (meadows) club of words that may be in the dictionary, but nobody actually says any longer, at least in the context of its original meaning.



Maybe. I can't offhand recall hearing it much, and I certainly never use it.

BTW, until 15-20 years ago I thought "colorado" meant something like "colorful." That ought to give you a clue.

More commonly the color red in Spanish is rojo.

Quote:

Beyonce ve caliente en colorado = Beyonce looks hot in red.



Assuming colorado means red, you said Beyonce sees hot in red (you're an endless fountain of morning amusement, BTW <w>)

Propper translation is "Beyonce SE ve caliente en colorado."

Next we can argue about the term "caliente," it isn't used much in the way you mean it. But I'd suggest you ask a man about it.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 10th, 2011 at 9:26:50 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Quote: wizard

Beyonce ve caliente en colorado = Beyonce looks hot in red.



Assuming colorado means red, you said Beyonce sees hot in red

Propper translation is "Beyonce SE ve caliente en colorado."

Next we can argue about the term "caliente," it isn't used much in the way you mean it. But I'd suggest you ask a man about it.



Thanks, as always.

I'm having a difficult time wrapping my head around reflexive verbs, but hope to figure it out eventually.

Of course we say attractive women look "hot" here all the time, but that expression may not carry over to other languages. So I changed it to precioso, in my search of an equivalent word to "gorgeous."
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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June 10th, 2011 at 9:34:46 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Of course we say attractive women look "hot" here all the time, but that expression may not carry over to other languages. So I changed it to precioso, in my search of an equivalent word to "gorgeous."



Current american English has become quite equisexual in some ways. A guy can be called hot, too, for example.

I've heard the men around the office sometimes reffer to an attractive woman as "está buenísima," which literally translates as "she's very good," really. But that is an idiomatic expression. It does mean "she's hot." In English in this context hot is used idiomatically, too, so maybe that's what you want.

If this is the case, then "Beyonce se ve buenísima en rojo."
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 10th, 2011 at 9:41:26 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

If this is the case, then "Beyonce se ve buenísima en rojo."



Somehow I recall a commercial as a kid where an Italian chef, probably Chef Boyardee, slaved over his stove, only to arrive at perfection, when he kissed his fingers and said "buenisimo!" (sp?). So I think any American my age or older may associate buenísima with food only.

I also understand that rojo would be normal word for red in this context, but I'm trying to put colorado in the ejemplo somehow, and have it refer to the color, not the state. Same issue when you rebuked me for using the word vega for meadow.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 10th, 2011 at 10:28:22 AM permalink
Quote:

I also understand that rojo would be normal word for red in this context, but I'm trying to put colorado in the ejemplo somehow, and have it refer to the color, not the state. Same issue when you rebuked me for using the word vega for meadow.



Yeah, I've just recalled one use. An old commedy show called "El Chapulín Colorado." I suppose it would mean the red cricket. It's a kind of superhero parody, and my brother insists Bumblee Man in the Simpsons is based on him. Please don't ask more questions about it.

Remember, too, that these states were named by Spaniards. They use the language differently, and they tended to hispanize terms and names to what they were comfortable pronouncing. Most important don't forget these names were given hundreds of years ago, so archaisms are to be expected.
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