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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 26th, 2011 at 5:14:46 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Not to diminish the fine answer from Mr. Graffy, but I wouldn't be too quick to rule out the sparrow theory. For one thing, there are lots of sparrows in coastal California. For another, there is El Nido Lane close by. I'm not saying the city in Spain theory is wrong, but I'd take 2 to 1 that my sparrow theory is correct.I'll be in that part of Santa Barbara for a week this summer and will do my best to investigate this further.



He did admit that he didn't actually know the answer. But we at least know it was once spelled correctly. Looking at a map not all of the street names are places in Madrid. There is another place called El Pardal in Galicia, northwest corner of Spain. It started the decade with a population of 6 and has been reduced to 4. So I will consider that an even more unlikely source of the name.

The "El Pardal" in Albacete (pop 69) seems to be too small to have a hotel, but there is a place of 25 rooms within 10 miles. The area is billed as a back to nature hiking place, without any golf courses or any other larger tourist attractions. There is a Parador in Albacete. If you are not familiar with them, paradors are government sponsored hotels in historic places in Spain. Their principal purpose is to encourage tourism into the backcountry.

I do admire your spunk. If he spent 25 years researching street names, you are a positive person if you think you might find something in a week.
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 26th, 2011 at 7:59:26 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I do admire your spunk. If he spent 25 years researching street names, you are a positive person if you think you might find something in a week.



I meant I would just annoy lots of people with the question, not really expecting an answer. I'm good at that. I'll be sure to include the Spanish department at UCSB in my list of victims.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 26th, 2011 at 10:57:27 PM permalink
Fecha: 27 de Mayo
Palbaras del día: Encantar, Querer, Amar


Spanish has three words for love. It is an important word, so I think it deserves multiple ways to express it. I know in Greek there are three words for Love as well:

Eros = erotic love
Philos = brotherly love (why they call Philadelphia the city of brotherly love)
Agape = the deepest kind of love

I'll leave the corrections to Nareed and Paco, but let me take a stab at defining the Spanish words for love.

Encantar = To be enchanted with. Perhaps a stronger version of like (gustar). Por ejemplo: Estoy encantado con los zapatos. = I love those shoes.
Querer = To want/love. Querer was the word of the day before, where we discussed how the listener call tell whether the speaker means want or love. If used to mean love my interpretation is that means to be enamored with. It seems to be used in situations involving the rush one feels when they first develop an affection for somebody else. Even when used to mean love, I think it also implies want as well. Perhaps that is why want and love share the same word.
Amar = This is the deepest form of love, which I would compare to the Greek agape.

One reason I became interested in the different love words is that the title of the song "I don't know how to love him" has two different translations in Spanish.

One of them is No Se Como Amarlo.
The other is No Se Como Quererle.

Lo siento, Dorothy, sé que odias esa canción. = Sorry, Dorothy, I know you hate that song.

Okay, let the corrections begin.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 27th, 2011 at 7:17:26 AM permalink
No corrections this time, just an addition:

Encantar also means "to charm" and "to enchant."
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 27th, 2011 at 7:44:40 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Okay, let the corrections begin.



No corrections. Just some amplifying points.



Me encanta is McDonald's slogan for the Latin market. Much like gustar the subject of the sentence is the object that is pleasing. "McDonald's is enchanting to me", instead of the more customary "I love McDonald's".
"Me encantan los mariscos" - "I love seafood" : Notice that the verb uses 3rd person plural since the subject of the sentence is plural (seafoods). You are literally saying "Seafood is enchanting to me".

The word "enchanting" is much less fruity in Spanish or French than it is in English. It is customary way to say "Nice to meet you" in both Spanish and French. That is what people are saying in French: "enchanté (ehn-shan-TAY) [said by a male] or Enchantée [said by a female]".

In Spanish you would say "Mucho gusto Encantado" if you are male or "Mucho gusto Encantada" if you are female.

Amar is more commonly used in the active voice, the same as English, "I love you".
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 27th, 2011 at 11:26:02 AM permalink
Shakira's pronounciation is very clear in Esto es Africa

Llego el momento, caen las murallas
Va a comenzar la unica justa de la batallas
No duele el golpe, no existe el miedo
Quitate el polvo, ponte de pie y vuelves al ruedo

Y la presion que sientes
Espera en ti, tu gente!
Ahora vamos por todo
y te acompaña la suerte
Tsamina mina zangalewa
Porque esto es Africa

Tsamina mina eh eh
Waka waka eh eh
Tsamina mina zangalewa
Porque esto es Africa

Oye a tu dios
y no estaras solo
llegas aqui para brillar
lo tienes todo
la hora se acerca
es el momento
Vas a ganar cada batalla
ya lo presiento

Hay que empezar de cero
para tocar el cielo
Ahora vamos por todo
Y todos vamos por ellos
Tsamina mina zangalewa
Porque esto es Africa

Tsamina mina eh eh
Waka waka eh eh
Tsamina mina zangalewa
Porque esto es Africa
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 27th, 2011 at 3:01:07 PM permalink
Thanks for the follow up comments. I'm in a rush at the moment so sorry I can't give any further cross talk at the moment.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 28th, 2011 at 5:59:58 AM permalink
The Wizard asked me to take over these daily posts for a while.

Fecha: 28 de Mayo
Palbara del día: Estacionamiento


English makes a distinction between parking lots and parking garages. Spanish does not. Any structure, lot or space meant for the purposes of parking cars, buses and/or trucks is called "Estacionamiento."

Examples:

"El restaurante no tiene estacionamiento" = "The restaurant doesn't provide parking facilities."

"El periferico del DF es el estacionamiento más grande del mundo" = "Mexico City's freeway is the world's biggest parking lot."

I'll try something more complicated tomorrow.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 28th, 2011 at 7:33:42 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Fecha: 28 de Mayo Palbara del día: Estacionamiento



Here is five uses of park in English
parking lot, estacionamiento
parking, aparcamiento
to park, para estacionar
park, parque
Chapultepec park, Bosque de Chapultepec

Can I park the car? -¿Puedo aparcar el coche?
Will you park the car? - ¿Va a aparcar el coche?
Nareed
Nareed
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May 28th, 2011 at 8:15:35 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Chapultepec park, Bosque de Chapultepec



Not quite. it's a park called El Bosque de Chapultepec ;)

BTW "parque" also means ammunition. Go figure. It's hardly used any more, though. For ammunition people will say "municiones" or "balas." In South America "parque" can also refer to parquet floors.

Quote:

Can I park the car? -¿Puedo aparcar el coche?
Will you park the car? - ¿Va a aparcar el coche?



That's technically correct. But if you say that in the north of Mexico, you'll find the locals will use "parquear" more often. You use it int he rest of Mexico and you'll be understood, but people will smile. the current term is "estacionar."

The related English word is "stationary," as in "not currently in motion."

I got a doozy for tomorrow >:)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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