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pacomartin
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June 10th, 2011 at 11:31:07 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I also understand that rojo would be normal word for red in this context, but I'm trying to put colorado in the ejemplo somehow, and have it refer to the color, not the state.




Mole coloradito is a Oaxequeno dish made with red ancho chilies to give it it's distinctive coloring.


Coloradito comes from the same Latin word that we get the English word "color" from. The word got associated with dying wool, which was often done in reddish colors. My dictionary says "ruddy" is a possible translation. I would associate it more with the color red in soils and rock, as opposed to paint or ink.

There is an archaic English word "gules" pronounced GYOOLZ which was used in heraldry for the color red. It comes from the Latin word gula or throat, which seems an obvious reference to certain birds. While the word may have been common at one time, I know of no modern usage.

Wizard
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June 11th, 2011 at 2:51:49 PM permalink
Fecha: 11 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Montana


Today we continue our look at states with Spanish names. The state for today is montana = mountainous. This is obviously going to be easy to remember. However, it seems that the more common word for mountainous is montañoso/a.

Another possibility is that they meant the name of the state to be mountain, which in Spanish is montaña. If somewhere along the line the tilde above the n got lost then it wouldn't be the first time that has happened north of the border. An example of this was mentioned in an earlier word of the day, sueño (dream). There is a street by that name is Isla Vista, California, but they omit the tilde above the n. The letter ñ gets no respect among us gringos.

Ejemplo time.



Suiza es un país montano = Switzerland is a mountainous country.

Per Nareed's correction, I changed montana to montano, because país is a masculine word.

My apologies in advance to Nareed for using an archaic word.
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Nareed
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June 11th, 2011 at 3:16:08 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Palabra del día: Montana



I was going to say that's not a Spanish word, but according to the dictionary it is. It means "Perteneciente o relativo al monte" "Pertaining or relative to a hill."

In that case, it's an extremely poor name for a mountainous state. for some reason lots of people who live near mountians are disdainful of hills <shrug>

Quote:

The letter ñ gets no respect among us gringos.



That's because the letter doesn't exist in English. The sound exists in many languages, but for some reason other languages don't have a specific letter for it.

Quote:

Suiza es un país montana = Switzerland is a mountainous country.



Going by the definition above that would be wrong. Besides the word is so obscure I can't say for certain whether it's right or not, even if Switzerland were known for hills rather than mountains. What I am sure is that you messed the gender again. País is a male noun, ergo the example, assuming it's right, should read "Suiza es un país montanO"

State is also a male noun in Spanish. So if you were to apply the example to the state, it would read "Monatna es un esatdo montano."

Any wonder I prefer English to my native language?



My apologies in advance to Nareed for using an archaic word.

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June 11th, 2011 at 3:51:38 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

It means "Perteneciente o relativo al monte" "Pertaining or relative to a hill."



Hmmm. spanishdict.com says montana means "mountainous." Not to say you're wrong, but that is where I got my definition. Per Paco's advice, I've been meaning to get a Spanish dictionary in Spanish. They are not easy to find in the U.S. -- time to put in an order at Amazon.
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Nareed
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June 11th, 2011 at 4:00:42 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hmmm. spanishdict.com says montana means "mountainous."



I checked it too. it does say that.


Quote:

Not to say you're wrong, but that is where I got my definition. Per Paco's advice, I've been meaning to get a Spanish dictionary in Spanish. They are not easy to find in the U.S. -- time to put in an order at Amazon.



I'm not claiming I'm right, but that the dictionary definition in Spanish is different. Just to make sure I checked another one. It gave out the definition as "adj. Del monte o relativo a él," which is consistent with the other definition I found.

Here are two links to Spanish dictionaries:

http://www.rae.es/rae.html

http://www.elmundo.es/diccionarios/
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pacomartin
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June 11th, 2011 at 4:07:16 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Any wonder I prefer English to my native language?



Nareed: Do you find that you use future conjugation ever?

My Oaxacan teacher said that Mexicans almost always use futuro perifrástico as in "Voy a comer asado el próximo domingo" instead of saying "Comeré asado el próximo domingo". I said that to someone and they got very upset that the teacher would say that. She said that the future is important to all Spanish dialects, and not just for Castillian Spanish.

I can't tell who is correct. While I was very impressed with their knowledge of grammer, the teachers in the institute, invariably worked two jobs while the other person who insisted the future was very important worked in a consulate.

If anyone is reading this blog, the futuro perifrástico or "paraphrased future" uses the present form of the verb "to go" with the word "a" and an "infinitive form". The second sentence uses a future conjugation.

Google translates both sentences as "I'll eat barbecue on Sunday" .

If you have anything to say about the importance of the other moods like conditional and subjunctive, I would like to hear them. I know that people use the imperitive all the time.
Nareed
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June 11th, 2011 at 7:21:50 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Nareed: Do you find that you use future conjugation ever?



I don't keep track of how I speak.

Quote:

My Oaxacan teacher said that Mexicans almost always use futuro perifrástico as in "Voy a comer asado el próximo domingo" instead of saying "Comeré asado el próximo domingo". I said that to someone and they got very upset that the teacher would say that. She said that the future is important to all Spanish dialects, and not just for Castillian Spanish.



I don't think the future is any more important to the average Spanish speaker than it is to the average Swahili, Hindu, Russian, English, Polish, etc etc speaker.

Quote:

Google translates both sentences as "I'll eat barbecue on Sunday" .



Your first example translates literally as "I'm going to eat asado next Sunday."

There's no Spanish word for barbecue. Asado is difficult to translate. Typically it just means cooked meat. Perhaps in South America they use the word to mean a specific kind of dish.

Quote:

If you have anything to say about the importance of the other moods like conditional and subjunctive, I would like to hear them. I know that people use the imperitive all the time.



I did tell you I know virtually nothing about the formal rules of grammar in any language, right? Anyway, as I said above, I don't keep track of how I speak.
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pacomartin
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June 12th, 2011 at 2:00:51 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I don't keep track of how I speak.



Granted. But which sentence sounds more natural?

(A) Voy a comer el pollo el próximo domingo.

(B) Comeré el pollo el próximo domingo.
Nareed
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June 12th, 2011 at 4:22:32 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Granted.



Why do I have trouble believing that? ;)

Quote:

But which sentence sounds more natural?

(A) Voy a comer el pollo el próximo domingo.

(B) Comeré el pollo el próximo domingo.



The first one.
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Nareed
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June 12th, 2011 at 5:41:37 PM permalink
Fecha: 12 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Tejas


Since the Wizard has not posted a word for today, I decided to usurp his turn (with some malice), and to continue the theme.

Some current US states were once part of Mexico, and previously were owned by Spain. Of these, two don't seem to have Spanish names: Utah and Texas. Someone else can deal with Utah, but Texas is a Spanish word, so long as you pronounce it "Tejas," (keep in mind the sound of the letter J in Spanish).

Now, in Mexico the state's name is spelled "Texas" but pronounced "Tejas." Why? beats me. Perhaps Paco knows the why of the multiple phoneme use of the letter X in Mexico. It can sound like X, but often does duty for S, SH and the Spanish J.

Anyway, a teja is a curved pottery tile used to cover slanted roofs. It's purpose is to channel rainwater from the roof. I'm not sure, but I think the word can be translated as "shingles."

Another Spanish word for roof, BTW, is "tejado," even when not covered with tejas. The play "Fiddler on the Roof" is known in Spanish as "El Violinista en el Tejado."

So why was Texas named that? No clue.
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June 12th, 2011 at 6:55:31 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

So why was Texas named that? No clue.



Thanks for pinch hitting for me today. Actually, I wasn't planning to use Texas in my series of states with Spanish names. Here is what Wikipedia says about the name:

Quote: wikipedia

The name Texas derives from táyshaʔ, a word in the Caddoan language of the Hasinai, which means "friends" or "allies."



I had never heard of the "Caddoan" languages. Also from Wikipedia, here is the executive summary on that, "The Caddoan languages are a family of Native American languages. They are spoken by Native Americans in parts of the Great Plains of the central United States, from North Dakota south to Oklahoma." I wonder if it is even spoken in the Indian casinos.
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Nareed
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June 12th, 2011 at 7:22:47 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for pinch hitting for me today.



Well, that's what you get for being so nice :P

Quote:

Actually, I wasn't planning to use Texas in my series of states with Spanish names.



I wasn't, either. It just hit me while I was starting to post.

BTW in Spain they spell it Tejas. They also spell Mexico as Mejico, which given the pronunciation is how it should be.
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June 12th, 2011 at 9:17:42 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

BTW in Spain they spell it Tejas. They also spell Mexico as Mejico, which given the pronunciation is how it should be.



Que interesante. It seems to me you don't see the letter x in Spanish much. Even less so than in English. Would you agree?

One of the few Spanish words I do know is Tejano (Texan). I'm not sure where I picked it up. It is not a small frustration that Spanish is spoken significantly differently depending on Spanish speaking country, and I'm teaching myself from several different sources. So, if they spell Texas with an x in Mexico, how do they spell the word for somebody from Texas?
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Nareed
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June 12th, 2011 at 9:29:16 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Que interesante. It seems to me you don't seem the letter x in Spanish much. Even less so than in English. Would you agree?



Well, naturally not many words begin with X. But it's used in the prefix "ex" which gets attached to too many words.

The thing is in Mexican Spanish the letter X varies it's sound. Aside from being used as a J in Mexico, it's a an S in names like Xochimilco (a lake in Mex City), and as an SH in Xola (it's the name of a street, beyond that I don't know what it means).

Quote:

One of the few Spanish words I do know is Tejano (Texan). I'm not sure where I picked it up. It is not a small frustration that Spanish is spoken significantly differently depending on Spanish speaking country, and I'm teaching myself from several different sources. So, if they spell Texas with an x in Mexico, how do they spell the word for somebody from Texas?



Come to think of it, the correct spelling might be Tejas. As you might guess, you don't see the word often. I use an X when I write it, in the rare occasions I do, but if I try to recall how it's written in the press or in books, I can't say exactly.
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June 12th, 2011 at 10:08:17 PM permalink
Fecha: 13 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Florida


Today we wrap up our look at states with names of Spanish origin. The word for today is florida = florid. Much like montana, another easy one to remember. Here are some related words:

florid (adj.) = florid/floral. Yes, the same spelling in both idiomas (languages). I'll await Nareed's response to see whether there is any difference between florid and florida.
flor (noun) = flower.
floreceer (verb) = to flower.
floreo (noun) = flourish/idle talk.
florido (adj.) = the masculine form of florida, which would be used to describe a masculine noun.
florista (noun) = florist (female). Obviamente, use floristo for a male florist.

Ejemplo time.



La boda fue muy florida. = The wedding was very floral.
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pacomartin
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June 12th, 2011 at 11:04:10 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard


florid (adj.) = florid/floral. Yes, the same spelling in both idiomas (languages). I'll await Nareed's response to see whether there is any difference between florid and florida.



I'll jump in ahead of Nareed. There are relatively few adjectives in Spanish that end in a consonant. The adjective difícil and español are among of the most common. I can't think of an adjective that ends in the letter "d". The word "florid" is not in the RAE. Only florido/florida.
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June 13th, 2011 at 4:36:33 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I'll jump in ahead of Nareed. There are relatively few adjectives in Spanish that end in a consonant. The adjective difícil and español are among of the most common. I can't think of an adjective that ends in the letter "d". The word "florid" is not in the RAE. Only florido/florida.



What about mal? Actually, I've always wondered when it is appropriate to use mal, when you also have malo and mala.

Getting back to florida, it is listed in spanishdict.com, as well as my hard copy of the Vox Compact Spanish and English Dictionary.
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pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 7:44:52 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard


What about mal? Actually, I've always wondered when it is appropriate to use mal, when you also have malo and mala.

Getting back to florida, it is listed in spanishdict.com, as well as my hard copy of the Vox Compact Spanish and English Dictionary.




Wizard, I said that there are relatively few adjectives that end in consonants. I didn't mean to imply that they are rarely used.

Mal is more "poor" or "poorly" and that malo/a is "bad".


When I use the spanishdict.com I get florid as an English word with the following translation into Spanish and definition.

florid
Florid
[ˈflɒrɪd]
adjetivo
1. florido(a) (style); colorado(a) (complexion)
Copyright © 2006 Chambers Harrap Publishers Limited

Florid [flo-rid]
adjetivo
1. Vivo, brillante; encarnado, de un rojo subido (face).
2. Embellecido con flores de retórica.
3. Sobrecargado de adornos.
4. Florido, lleno o adornado de flores.
5. Elegante, llamativo.
Velazquez® Spanish and English Dictionary. Copyright © 2007 by Velazquez® Press. All rights
Nareed
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:04:22 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

florido (adj.) = the masculine form of florida, which would be used to describe a masculine noun.
florista (noun) = florist (female). Obviamente, use floristo for a male florist.



Are you familiar with the expression "heads I win, tails you lose"? That's what nouns are doing to you.

In the case of "florista" gender for some reason doesn't apply. I don't know why. I recall my highschool Spanish teacher saying many other nouns have no gender, like doctor, presidente, ministro, piloto and others, but I don't recall if he explained why.

The adjective florida/florido does have a gender distinction. Go figure.
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:27:35 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

When I use the spanishdict.com I get florid as an English word with the following translation into Spanish and definition.

florid
Florid
[ˈflɒrɪd]
adjetivo
1. florido(a) (style); colorado(a) (complexion)



Interesting that colorado, our word of the day three days ago, should come up in our search for the meaning of florida. What a casualidad (coincidence).

So, if we say Ella tiene una complexión florida, does that mean "she has a reddish completion"?
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pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:28:49 AM permalink
Nareed, what about the word florid with no vowel on the end? I think that is an English word only. What do you think?
Nareed
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:33:23 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So, if we say Ella tiene una complexión florida, does that mean "she has a reddish completion"?



Maybe. Fact is I've never heard the word "florida" used in any other way but as a name for the state of Florida.
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Nareed
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:34:06 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Nareed, what about the word florid with no vowel on the end? I think that is an English word only. What do you think?



It's an English word.
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pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:36:16 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard


Interesting that colorado, our word of the day three days ago, should come up in our search for the meaning of florida. What a casualidad (coincidence).

So, if we say Ella tiene una complexión florida, does that mean "she has a reddish completion"?



The etymology online dictionary says Sense of "ruddy" is first recorded 1640s. Meaning "profusely adorned, as with flowers," is from 1650s.

Personally , I would not normally associate the word florid with ruddy, but I can't argue with the dictionary. Your sentence would have to mean she has a reddish complexion, but I don't know if you would actually say that about a woman, or if it would be a compliment or an insult.
Nareed
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:43:16 AM permalink
You're both missing the term "rosy" from your discussion about comlpexion.
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June 13th, 2011 at 11:27:02 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You're both missing the term "rosy" from your discussion about comlpexion.



Reminds me of this exchange from Seinfeld, in which Jerry set up George on a blind date.

George: Is there a pinkish hue?
Jerry: A pinkish hue?
George: Yeah, a rosy glow.
Jerry: There's a hue. She's got great eyebrows; women kill to have her eyebrows.
George: Who cares about eyebrows?

Here is how Google translates it:

George: ¿Hay un tono rosado?
Jerry: ¿Un tono rosado?
George: Sí, un brillo rosado.
Jerry: Hay un matiz. Tiene las cejas grandes, las mujeres que matan a sus cejas.
George: ¿Quién se preocupa por las cejas?

Any difference between tono and mariz in Spanish?

Por el camino, felicitaciones a Nareed por ser el miembro más activo.
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June 13th, 2011 at 2:14:33 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Que interesante. It seems to me you don't seem the letter x in Spanish much. Even less so than in English. Would you agree?

One of the few Spanish words I do know is Tejano (Texan). I'm not sure where I picked it up. It is not a small frustration that Spanish is spoken significantly differently depending on Spanish speaking country, and I'm teaching myself from several different sources. So, if they spell Texas with an x in Mexico, how do they spell the word for somebody from Texas?



I've eaten some pretty good Tejano food which I think we know as Tex-Mex and Selena made Tejano music hugely popular during her very brief life.
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June 13th, 2011 at 3:19:12 PM permalink
Quote: benbakdoff

I've eaten some pretty good Tejano food which I think we know as Tex-Mex and Selena made Tejano music hugely popular during her very brief life.



It is pretty inevitable that any loanword may have alternate spellings. Texas is a native american word, so it can be spelled either way. For instance, the French phrase chaise longue is spelled as what in English? The original meaning was "long chair", but even the meaning has been altered.

Texas trivia #1. What city and street has this plaque?



Texas trivia #2. Name the six flags over Texas.
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June 13th, 2011 at 3:24:13 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I had never heard of the "Caddoan" languages. Also from Wikipedia, here is the executive summary on that, "The Caddoan languages are a family of Native American languages.



The Caddo Indians were a "native" tribe in East Texas, if my 7th grade Texas history holds up. Also, they were the ones that bound planks of wood to their children's heads I believe... I forgot the name of that....

-B
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June 13th, 2011 at 3:34:11 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Texas trivia #1. What city and street has this plaque?



I'll claim half a credit: London.

BTW there was a reference to Texas today in the newspaper and it was spelled with an X. So that settles that. In mexican Spanish it's spelled "Texas" but pronounced "Tejas."
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pacomartin
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June 13th, 2011 at 3:42:53 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I had never heard of the "Caddoan" languages. Also from Wikipedia, here is the executive summary on that, "The Caddoan languages are a family of Native American languages. They are spoken by Native Americans in parts of the Great Plains of the central United States, from North Dakota south to Oklahoma." I wonder if it is even spoken in the Indian casinos.



I am not sure why you would think you would have heard of one of the indigenous languages? There were literally thousands of them, and most of them have either vanished or are in the process of vanishing. At some point it takes a huge amount of money to maintain a dying language. You have to fund radio stations, and television, plus schools for young people. Since many of them had no written language, you need to develop one. The wealthier countries can support languages like Gaelic and Welsh and even revive the dead ones like Cornish.

In Oaxaca they have Otomanguean family of languages. All of them are tonal, and many include whistling words. The most effective thing is to write songs with some verses in Spanish and some in Zapotec like El Feo.
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June 13th, 2011 at 7:40:51 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Texas trivia #2. Name the six flags over Texas.


1. Spain
2. Mexico
3. Republic of Texas
4. U.S.A.
~~~~~~~
Uhh......
5. France?
6. Britain?
Native American?
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June 13th, 2011 at 7:53:01 PM permalink
Quote: teddys

1. Spain
2. Mexico
3. Republic of Texas
4. U.S.A.
~~~~~~~
Uhh......
5. France?
6. Britain?
Native American?


Not British since their rule never extended more than a few hundred miles in from the coast. Native Americans did not have flags. You are missing a significant historical event.

And yes, the Republic of Texas did establish an embassy in London before it dissolved.
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June 13th, 2011 at 8:07:11 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Not British since their rule never extended more than a few hundred miles in from the coast. Native Americans did not have flags. You are missing a significant historical event.

Oops. Ah, yeah, C.S.A.
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June 13th, 2011 at 11:37:36 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Native Americans did not have flags.



That was unfortunate for them. To Europe, no flag signified free land.
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June 14th, 2011 at 6:20:48 AM permalink
Fecha: 14 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Punta


For the next five days or so let's take a look at Spanish slang. This is an area where Spanish teachers and books tend to shy away from, so take anything I say with a grain of sal (salt).

To get started, the word for today is punta. The primary legitimate meaning for punta is point. It can also mean a host of pointy things, like small nails, the tip of antlers, or the stub left after sawing off a branch from a log. (soucre: spanishdict.com). translate.google.com, says it means "tip." I assume that means the pointy end of something, not a propina (gratuity).

There seems to be some debate online about what the slang meaning is. A common translation is "bitch." Other sources say it means "whore." A related word I found is:

putañar = to have sex with a prostitute.

Ejemplo time.

¡Dame una cerveza, punta! = Give me a beer, bitch!

I'll leave it to Nareed and Paco to give us the insider's guide. I'm getting in way over my head.
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Nareed
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June 14th, 2011 at 6:41:10 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

translate.google.com, says it means "tip." I assume that means the pointy end of something, not a propina (gratuity).



That's so.

Quote:

There seems to be some debate online about what the slang meaning is. A common translation is "bitch." Other sources say it means "whore." A related word I found is:

putañar = to have sex with a prostitute.

Ejemplo time.

¡Dame una cerveza, punta! = Give me a beer, bitch!



You have the wrongest word.

PuNta means tip, as you explained. It may also refer to the farthest point in a geographical area, such as a cape or a peninsula, as found in names like Punta del Este.

Puta, without the N, is a different word. It's not slang, it's a word for whore. It's regarded as an insult, too.

The reason some thing it means bitch is that the expression "hijo de puta," is equivalent to the English "son of a bitch." But while the intent of both phrases is the same, to insult a person and his mother in the same sentence, the literal meanings are different.
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Wizard
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June 14th, 2011 at 6:59:57 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

PuNta means tip, as you explained. It may also refer to the farthest point in a geographical area, such as a cape or a peninsula, as found in names like Punta del Este.

Puta, without the N, is a different word. It's not slang, it's a word for whore. It's regarded as an insult, too.

The reason some thing it means bitch is that the expression "hijo de puta," is equivalent to the English "son of a bitch." But while the intent of both phrases is the same, to insult a person and his mother in the same sentence, the literal meanings are different.



Hmmm. I did some more searching, and some sources agree with you. However, also consider these sources:

Quote: answers.reference.com


Q: What does Punta Mean in Spanish?
A: Punta is Spanish derogatory word for a woman's butt. It is usually a term used disrespectfully or as a curse word. Punta is not a good word to use if you plan to get on someones good side.


Source: answers.reference.com

Quote: answers.yahoo.com


Q: What does (punta) mean in spanish?
A: Punta means "b----" in Spanish.


Source: www.chacha.com
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Nareed
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June 14th, 2011 at 7:28:45 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hmmm. I did some more searching, and some sources agree with you. However, also consider these sources:



I've no idea whether somewhere in Latin America punta means a woman's posterior, but I've never heard of it.

As to the second reference, obviously they made the mistake of confusing puNta with puta. It's not as bad a confusing bit with bitch, but it's close.

You ought to be careful with internet sources. Remember a word that sounded like crab?
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June 14th, 2011 at 7:42:19 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'm getting in way over my head.



I would have though everyone knew that word by now. The word may be nothing more obscure than an abbreviation for prostituta.

I am a little confused about callejera, built around the word "calle" which means street. This may be a culturally dependent word, which means different things in different Spanish speaking countries. Sometimes it seems to mean "streetwalker" and sometimes it seems to refer to a "street scene" with only benign meanings.


I also do not understand this photo of a seagull labelledputa gaviota. Gaviota is a seagull, but I am not sure why this photo has the extra word.

Another word that seems confusing is putañero which my slang dictionary defines as "pimp", but in other websites seems to be a "john".
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June 14th, 2011 at 8:04:24 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You ought to be careful with internet sources. Remember a word that sounded like crab?



I know you can't take online sources too seriously. They don't call it the "World Wide Wasteland" for nothing. The reason I created my Odds site in 1997 was because most other gambling sites at the time were utter crap.

I admit the bulk of the evidence is on your side. However, before I admit defeat, here is where I got punta=bitch from.

Quote: Bueno, entonces...


¿Podría decirme donde está la panadería, punta? = Can you tell me where the bakery is, bitch



To see this translation directly, go to the quiz for lesson 7. You'll have to put in a name, and go all the way to the last question, number 10. This is one of the choices (obviously a wrong one) for the polite way to ask for a pastry. The English translation is given in the answers after you complete the quiz.
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June 14th, 2011 at 8:28:54 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I admit the bulk of the evidence is on your side. However, before I admit defeat, here is where I got punta=bitch from.



There's another mistake. In question 7, "When David says, "Estoy sensible", what does he mean?" and gives the correct answer as "sensitive," with the explanation "Estoy sensible" = I am sensitive.

That's wrong. The right form for that phrase is "Soy sensible," if you want to say "I am sensitive." "Estoy sensible" means something more akin to being temporarily too sensitive to pain. As when you get sunburn you might say "estoy sensible porque me quemé con el sol."

So there :P

The rest of the quiz was ok, except lots of people outside South America may not know what "alfajor" means. I'm also puzzled by "cañoncito," I assume it's the pastry in the photo.
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pacomartin
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June 14th, 2011 at 9:08:11 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I admit the bulk of the evidence is on your side. However, before I admit defeat, here is where I got punta=bitch from. To see this translation directly, go to the quiz for lesson 7. You'll have to put in a name, and go all the way to the last question, number 10. This is one of the choices (obviously a wrong one) for the polite way to ask for a pastry. The English translation is given in the answers after you complete the quiz.



Wizard,

You're pushing the limits on how I can answer this in PG-13, but I think I can do it.

Punta is not a vulgar word by any means. You will see it everywhere in Mexico on signs. Literally it means point, but is used for peninsulas, headland, or rock outcroppings. Punta Gorda is a city in Florida where my friend lives.

However, if you use it as a name to call a woman, then the word "bitch" is the extremely polite way to translate that word. The more anatomically correct way is to translate it as "point", but in the context of the sentence it is referring to a special part of a woman's "lady parts" (the cl--). It is, however, a completely different word than the much more common "puta". So the framers of the quiz should have pointed out that the sentence is not just casual, but vulgar.
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June 14th, 2011 at 9:50:09 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

You're pushing the limits on how I can answer this in PG-13, but I think I can do it.

Punta is not a vulgar word by any means. You will see it everywhere in Mexico on signs. Literally it means point, but is used for peninsulas, headland, or rock outcroppings. Punta Gorda is a city in Florida where my friend lives.

However, if you use it as a name to call a woman, then the word "bitch" is the extremely polite way to translate that word. The more anatomically correct way is to translate it as "point", but in the context of the sentence it is referring to a special part of a woman's "lady parts" (the cl--). It is, however, a completely different word than the much more common "puta". So the framers of the quiz should have pointed out that the sentence is not just casual, but vulgar.



Thanks, we now have a third opinion. So, to summarize, you say that punta refers to the part of a woman that rhymes with Delores? Would you disagree that puta means prostitute?

By the way, since the topic demands it, we can relax the PG-13 standard for this discussion. Say whatever you wish, as long as it is on topic.
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Nareed
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June 14th, 2011 at 10:05:33 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

However, if you use it as a name to call a woman, then the word "bitch" is the extremely polite way to translate that word. The more anatomically correct way is to translate it as "point", but in the context of the sentence it is referring to a special part of a woman's "lady parts" (the cl--).



Where on Earth does it mean that?

I've never heard it used that way, and I do know a little about slang and curse words in South America and Spain. I'm less clear on central America.
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Nareed
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June 14th, 2011 at 10:06:29 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

By the way, since the topic demands it, we can relax the PG-13 standard for this discussion. Say whatever you wish, as long as it is on topic.



"It's Good to be the King!" :)
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June 14th, 2011 at 12:46:24 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"It's Good to be the King!" :)



Yes, it is. I prefer to be known as el rey from now on.
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June 14th, 2011 at 12:57:07 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Yes, it is. I prefer to be known as el rey from now on.


Okay. Will you sing this, then?:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGbiWnoWTto
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June 14th, 2011 at 1:43:04 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Where on Earth does it mean that?I've never heard it used that way, and I do know a little about slang and curse words in South America and Spain. I'm less clear on central America.



I did not get a clear slang definition, but here are some references.

Punta in Wikipedia says it is a type of music and dance popular in Central America. The unofficial etymology is said to be from West African language for "buttock".

Urban Dictionary is like Wikipedia of slang. People offer their definition of a slang word, and other people vote for or against the definition. In the case of the word punta there are 5 definitions which contradict each other.
The top three definitions ranked top to bottom are:
A) Spanish for "end":
1) A point of land extending into a body of water. (1 example) Punta Blanca - White point.
2) Rude term for the buttocks, usually female. (2 example) "What a punta!"
B) Punta is NOT a slang word. PUTA is a hispanic slang term for "whore". Punta is what non-hispanics think is Puta. For some reason they put the "N" in it.
(Example) "Did you hear that Puta call her a Punta? hahaaha Whats a Punta?"Spanish for "end":
C) The slang term, made up by Groucho-Won, that is commonly in conjunction with the one and only, Vagina.
(Example) She spread her legs and I observed her punta.
The last 2 definitions are jokes.
Also the similarly spelled word puntang is listed as of Tagalog origin which now means pussy.
The 4th definition is the Wikipedia definition
The 5th definition is a joke

So urban dictionary is unclear.

Another "expert" in Advicenators says many people would try and tell you punta means bitch but that is not correct. The true meaning is worse. Punta means durty pussy.
I am reluctant to take the final definition from someone who can't spelling "dirty".

Beanie Sigel What You Talkin Bout? (I Ain't Ya Average Cat) says specifically that punta is slang for vagina


Then I noticed that some websites like Spanish Answers repeatedly use the term punta del clitoris.

Then another use of the term punta clitoris.

So for slang references I found some that say (1) buttocks, (2) misspelled word puta, (3) male genitalia, (4) female genitalia, (5) bitch. But the term "punta del clitoris" kept showing up in several places. It seemed like the most logical explanation of why the word would mean vagina.

The words have to come from somewhere, and it has to make some kind of sense. The word "bitch" is from Old English "bicce " and it means "female of the dog". So the word existed in that form for hundreds of years before it was first applied as a term of contempt towards women (about 6 centuries ago).

The obvious literal word for "bitch" in Spanish is "perra". Enough references were found that said specifically punta=vagina, and there seems to be an obvious connection to the point of a vagina.
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June 14th, 2011 at 3:15:36 PM permalink
Quote: teddys

Okay. Will you sing this, then?: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGbiWnoWTto



Get me drunk enough, and give the lyrics, and I'd be happy to. Somebody is going to post a picture of me singing karaoke any day now.

Quote: pacomartin

Then I noticed that some websites like Spanish Answers repeatedly use the term punta del clitoris.



Good answer, thanks. Me he estado preguntando toda mi vida, pero todavía no sé dónde está el punta del clitoris.
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