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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 15th, 2011 at 10:25:30 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The correct sentence is "yo le gusto a la reina."



Nareed,
I think what I want to know is how often do you say gusto as a verb, gustas, or gustamos? I don't want to know if it is allowed, but how often do you hear it?
Wizard
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May 15th, 2011 at 10:39:03 AM permalink
Thanks for going beyond the call of duty, as always.

Quote: pacomartin

preservativo (Spanish)



I find both the English usage of preservative (something to make food last longer) or a condom. Of course, I second usage will be easier to commit to memory.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 15th, 2011 at 10:53:39 AM permalink
While I am sure both translations are in the dictionary, the secondary translation is more common in conversation. In a similar manner "huevos" should be carefully used outside of very clear use such as "Huevos Rancheros".
Wizard
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May 15th, 2011 at 11:03:36 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

In a similar manner "huevos" should be carefully used outside of very clear use such as "Huevos Rancheros".



Nareed and I were discussing this via PM a while back. My tutor says that huevo is perfectly fine, but huevón can mean lazy, or a "bad word" as she put it. My investigation led me to believe the "bad word" was slang for testicle.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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May 15th, 2011 at 12:52:57 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Nareed,
I think what I want to know is how often do you say gusto as a verb, gustas, or gustamos? I don't want to know if it is allowed, but how often do you hear it?



Not very often.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 15th, 2011 at 4:28:17 PM permalink
Nareed

I met a woman who was travel through Mexico. She said she couldn't be bothered to learn conjugation so she simply said all her verbs as
estoy/estás/está/estamos/están saliendo/tacado/usando/utilizado etc. (in the present).

She knew she sounded funny, but she said she was invariably understood.

I have never completely understood how you decide when to say "estoy hablando" instead of "hablo" or "estoy vistando" instead of "visito". It's easy enough to read, but the rules are different in English. We make far more use of this use of the progressive than you do in Spanish.
Wizard
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May 15th, 2011 at 4:58:29 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I met a woman who was travel through Mexico. She said she couldn't be bothered to learn conjugation so she simply said all her verbs as
estoy/estás/está/estamos/están saliendo/tacado/usando/utilizado etc. (in the present).

She knew she sounded funny, but she said she was invariably understood.



I like her idea. Personally I have trouble with everything except the present tense. Not that I know most exceptions to the general rules for the present tense.

What I do is make my best effort in the present tense and then point backwards for the past tense, and forward for future.

Question for you guys. Can you give me one each of an AR, ER, and IR verbs that follow the general conjugation rules for all tenses with NO exceptions? I ask because I need to review the other tenses and would like have some nice steady verbs to use as a basis.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 15th, 2011 at 5:16:43 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard


Question for you guys. Can you give me one each of an AR, ER, and IR verbs that follow the general conjugation rules for all tenses with NO exceptions? I ask because I need to review the other tenses and would like have some nice steady verbs to use as a basis.


hablar, comer, and vivir have no exceptions

Mexicans hardly ever use the future tense, but it is fairly common in Spain.
The preterite perfect is not used much anywhere.

The simple present (indicative mood) is often translated into English as the present progressive.


The Futuro perifrastico (going to) is a way of talking about the future but using the present tense. The link is for Spanish speakers learning English, but the concept is the same.

Use the conjugations of ir (voy, vas, va, vamos, van) - followed by "a" - followed by infinitive and you have the futuro perifrastico.

voy a pintar I am going to paint
No Te Voy A Perdonar I am not going to forgive
Wizard
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May 15th, 2011 at 6:26:02 PM permalink
Thanks Paco!
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
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May 16th, 2011 at 6:49:39 AM permalink
Fecha: 16 de Mayo
Palabra del día: TRIGO


For lack of a better idea, I'm going to look at some street names from my beloved Isla Vista, California for some more words of the day. I'll generally start at the ocean and work my way north.

The first two streets are rather easy, and I think most Americans would be able to figure out:

Del Playa = By the beach. It should be noted that this is bad Spanish, because del=de el, but playa is a feminine word, and el is the masculine form of "the." There are some exceptions to rule about words ending in "a" being feminine, like día, which is masculine, but I'm pretty sure playa is not one of those exceptions.

Sabado Tarde = Saturday afternoon. I like the sound of this one. I lived on this street the summer after graduation.

So, finally, the word of the day trigo = wheat. It may also mean grains in general, or someones affairs (as in don't mess in my affairs). I'll await the real Spanish speakers to chime in on these other uses.

For your tarea (homework), can you give me a sentence en Español using trigo?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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