Thread Rating:

Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
May 16th, 2011 at 6:54:28 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So, finally, the word of the day trigo = wheat. I may also mean grains in general, or someones affairs (as in don't mess in my affairs). I'll await the real Spanish speakers to chime in on these other uses.



I've never heard or read it used as anything other than wheat. For grains in general you say "granos" or "granos y semillas."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
May 16th, 2011 at 6:57:44 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I have never completely understood how you decide when to say "estoy hablando" instead of "hablo" or "estoy vistando" instead of "visito".



It depends on what you're doing. if you're int he pone with someone and I ask what you're doing, would you say "I'm talking with Joe," or "I talk to Joe"? The first example means "Estoy hablando con Joe," the second means "Hablo con Joe."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
May 16th, 2011 at 7:06:58 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Del Playa = By the beach. It should be noted that this is bad Spanish, because del=de el, but playa is a feminine word, and el is the masculine form of "the." There are some exceptions to rule about words ending in "a" being feminine, like día, which is masculine, but I'm pretty sure playa is not one of those exceptions.



I wonder if this used to be Calle De la Playa and it got shortened incorrectly. There is a La playa field in Santa Barbara.

I can't find anything on the internet on how they came up with this grammatically incorrect phrase. Nice catch Wiz.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
May 16th, 2011 at 8:20:33 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

It depends on what you're doing. if you're int he pone with someone and I ask what you're doing, would you say "I'm talking with Joe," or "I talk to Joe"? The first example means "Estoy hablando con Joe," the second means "Hablo con Joe."


I guess I'm not being clear.
Normally, in English you would not say "I talk to Joe" without a qualifying phrase like "I talk to Joe,every morning". The phrase "I talk to Joe" by itself is incomplete without some added description of frequency or habitual action.
So if you are thinking in English you have a tendency to translate most simple phrases as "Estoy ..." or "Esta ..." with a present participle.
But native Spanish speakers do sometimes use the simple present without any qualifying phrase.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
May 16th, 2011 at 5:32:58 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

So if you are thinking in English you have a tendency to translate most simple phrases as "Estoy ..." or "Esta ..." with a present participle.
But native Spanish speakers do sometimes use the simple present without any qualifying phrase.



I am fluent in two languages, and highly ignorant of the formal rules of grammar of both. As for grammatical terminology, I slept through Spanish class. So:

In Spanish you describe present actions by saying "Estoy haciendo tal cosa" or "Que llame más tarde. Estoy muy ocupada." (English "I'm doing this and that thing." and "Tell him to call later. I'm very busy.")

You'd say things like "I talk to..." mostly in the context of describing actions you usually take. For example: "Cuando viajo a Las Vegas juego video poquer" or "Todas las mañanas corro diez kilometros." ("When I travel to Las vegas I play video poker" "I run 6 miles every morning")

But when describing a present action it's as you say "Estoy..."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
May 16th, 2011 at 8:22:01 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I am fluent in two languages, and highly ignorant of the formal rules of grammar of both. As for grammatical terminology, I slept through Spanish class.



It's very common to forget your grammar lessons regarding your first lesson. If you ask an English speaker to conjugate a regular English verb, and to list ten irregular verbs he will usually stare at you blankly. But he will use them correctly. But the normal way people study a foreign language is to get immersed in grammar.

Let me quote the following Introductory Spanish

Quote: Introduction to Spanish


Thus ahora ella canta would usually be translated as now she is singing.
Note that it is possible in Spanish to say ella está cantando, which is a word-for-word translation of the English she is singing.
But that form isn't used nearly as often in Spanish as it is in English.



So going from Spanish to English if you read, ahora ella canta you don't translate it to She sings now or Now she sings since the simple present is awkard English.

My problem is going from English to Spanish. I would want to say ella está cantando most of the time since it is how I say it in English. But the warning in this lesson (which I've heard dozens of times) , says this form isn't used nearly as often in Spanish as it is in English.

Now you used that progressive form twice in your example, but both times you seemed to be doing it in a sentence where there is some personal emphasis.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
May 17th, 2011 at 7:26:09 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

So going from Spanish to English if you read, ahora ella canta you don't translate it to She sings now or Now she sings since the simple present is awkard English.



Yes, you do, provided you use whole sentences and not fragments. Example:

"Laura inició su carrera como solista. Ahora ella canta con un grupo." "Laura started her career as a solo artist. Now she sings for a band."

See?

Quote:

My problem is going from English to Spanish. I would want to say ella está cantando most of the time since it is how I say it in English. But the warning in this lesson (which I've heard dozens of times) , says this form isn't used nearly as often in Spanish as it is in English.



Your problem lies in going from English to Spanish. I may have mentioned my english teacher. He was great. Among his many tips for mastering a foreign language, is that you should also learn to think in the language you're using. That's the way to fluency. If you keep thinking in your native tongue and translating, well, it won't come out right and it's a lot of mental work.

Naturally first you need to learn the target language, at least a little of it, before you can apply this advice. But within a limited vocabulary you can still do it.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
May 17th, 2011 at 7:53:22 AM permalink
Fecha: 17 de Mayo
Palabra del día: NIDO


The word of the day also comes from Isla Vista. El nido=the nest.

El Nido Lane has a special place in my heart. It was where I lived my last year at UCSB. Like most Isla Vista apartments, it was small, and with six guy living in it, indeed seemed like crowded nest. It was a great location. Close enough to the ocean to hear the waves, and just one apartment unit over from the campus. My roommate, Kent, was my favorite of all my five college roommates. Here are some pictures from the El Nido nest.


Looking east down El Nido lane. As usual, finding a parking space was not easy. That Toyota camper belonged to one my six apartment mates.


This is me juggling on the "balcony." My five apartment mates and I shared the second floor (unit B).


The alley next to the nest. Another example of the tight parking situation.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
May 17th, 2011 at 11:14:53 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 17 de Mayo
Palabra del día: NIDO

The word of the day also comes from Isla Vista. El nido=the nest.



A very old word where the English word comes from common ancestor to both the Latin and the Anglos -Saxon words. In Latin it is "nidus" in Anglo Saxon it is "nistan" but both come from an older word Proto Indo European (PIE) "nizdo". The PIE are the prehistoric people that lived on the steppes of present day Russian-Ukraine who eventually formed the European, Turkish, Iranian, Mesopotamian, and Indus Valley. They were the founders of civilization, writing and mathematics



In English the word nest is partly ne like in netherworld or "down" world and st as in "sit". So a "nest" is where you sit down.
In Latin "nidus" is also literally a nest.

In Spanish it is a masculine noun (which goes against your initial guess)
"caer del nido" - literally "to fall into the nest", but in English you are more likely to to "come down to earth"
"manchar el propio nido" - " to foul one's own nest" but manchar taken more literally as "to spot" or "to stain"
"nido de abeja" literally "nest of bees" but with meaning of a "honeycomb pattern"
"nido de amor" - love-nest
"nido de víboras" - "nest of vipers"
"nido de ametralladoras" - machine-gun nest
"un nido de ladrónes" - "a nest [den] of thieves"

There was a short lived attempt at making Spanish language films in America that would also appeal to the gringo market. The initial attempt starred a lot of good looking Mexican telenovela stars and was called Ladrón que roba a ladrón (Spanish or English trailer) . the story is about a duo who rob a corrupt Latino who preys on ignorant immigrant cancer patients with Agua de Dios. Since professional thieves won't help them they hire a bunch of immigrants (all of whom are beautiful telenovela stars).

konceptum
konceptum
Joined: Mar 25, 2010
  • Threads: 33
  • Posts: 790
May 17th, 2011 at 3:30:44 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 17 de Mayo
Palabra del día: NIDO


In Tucson, AZ, there is a fabulous Mexican restaurant called Mi Nidito (My Little Nest). They always served excellent Mexican food. As an example of how popular the place is, they do not take reservations, and the wait is usually at least one hour, during off times. It is not uncommon to wait as long as two hours for a table during normal dinner times.

When Bill Clinton was president, he ate at Mi Nidito. They hoped he would visit a second time, but I don't believe he did.

I lived in Tucson at the time Bill Clinton ate there. I really feel like the visit of the president went to the owners' heads. They made a "Presidential Table" and also a "Presidential Plate", which is supposedly what Bill ordered when he visited.

Still, the food there is pretty spectactular, and anytime I make it down to Tucson, I like to try and eat there. But sometimes the wait really annoys me.

This has nothing to do with Spanish words, other than the fact that the word of the day reminded me of the restaurant. :)

  • Jump to: