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aluisio
aluisio
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April 18th, 2012 at 6:52:45 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard



Aloce cuando alguien llama día de Acción de Gracias "día de los pavos." = It drives me crazy when people refer to Thanksgiving as "turkey day."

Extra credit: Say, in Spanish, what drives you crazy.



I think you are missing a pronom in your sentence. It would be better suited as: "Me aloca cuando alguien llama día de Acción de Gracias "día de los pavos".

Me aloca que haya tanta gente mala en el mundo.
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Nareed
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April 18th, 2012 at 7:38:31 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I think Me vuelve loco would be "It/you drives me crazy." What I had a hard time accepting was that I thought it was saying "It returns me crazy," as if I was crazy before and now I am again. However, as I understand it, volver doesn't just mean to "to return" but also to cause a change of states.



The literal translation is "it turns me crazy." The word "drive," in that sense, doesn't really exist in Spanish.

Quote:

So, after all this trouble, I discover there is a perfectly good word for "drive crazy," which is alocar. A related word would be alocado, which just means crazy.



I'm not sure your interpretation is right. According to the dictionary it means "to cause insanity." However, it's not used much, and not in that way. As it turns out, I have a god example. Years ago we had a dog who really liked to run. When we were late in taking her out for a walk, she would find her way to the living room and run two or three laps around it and the dining room (we had a big house). When that happened, someone would innevitably say "Ya se alocó la perra." But what that meant was "the dog's gone wild."

Quote:

The question for the advanced readers is why does it seem most people user volver and loco to speaking about driving crazy, when just a single word, alocar, will do?



I don't know why. Language use is funny in some ways.

Quote:

Aloce cuando alguien llama día de Acción de Gracias "día de los pavos." = It drives me crazy when people refer to Thanksgiving as "turkey day."



Sorry, that's wrong.

"Enloquesco cuando alguien llama AL día...." The rest is fine.

I should say the meaning I used is "I go crazy when..." rather than "It drives me crazy when..." We bump back with trying to translate a common expression exactly into another language. Sometimes there isn't an exact one, but there are equivalent ones. You should go with the latter and forget about fniding an exact one.

Quote:

Extra credit: Say, in Spanish, what drives you crazy.



Pero eso me tomaría el resto de la semana.
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April 18th, 2012 at 8:15:20 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Ya se alocó la perra." But what that meant was "the dog's gone wild."



Maybe it was a typo, but I thought the word for dog, male or female, was perro. Am I wrong? Is there a specific word for a male and female dog? Speaking of which, everyone knows the word for a female dog in English, but is there an English term for a male dog?

Quote:

Pero eso me tomaría el resto de la semana.



Entiendo. Entonces, pido solo una cosa.
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Nareed
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April 18th, 2012 at 8:24:15 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Maybe it was a typo, but I thought the word for dog, male or female, was perro. Am I wrong?



Perro = male dog.
Perra = female dog.

Quote:

Speaking of which, everyone knows the word for a female dog in English, but is there an English term for a male dog?



This reminds me of a joke:

Niña: Papá, ¿como se llama el caballo macho?
Papá: Potro
Niña: ¿Y el caballo hembra?
Papá: Yegua
Niña: ¿Y el caballo chuiquito?
Papá: Potrillo
Niña: ¿Y entonces cual caballo se llama caballo?

Quote:

Entiendo. Entonces, pido solo una cosa.



Me tomaría el resto del día elegir una sola.
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Wizard
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April 18th, 2012 at 8:40:32 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed


Niña: ¿Y el caballo hembra?
Papá: Yegua



That jokes makes a good point. Why isn't a female horse just a caballa? Wouldn't that be the logical word for it?
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Nareed
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April 18th, 2012 at 8:49:59 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

That jokes makes a good point. Why isn't a female horse just a caballa? Wouldn't that be the logical word for it?



I gave up looking for logic in livestock names long ago.

For that amtter, why isn't a male horse called "caballo"? In English they'd be called "colt," "mare" and "foal." None are called "horse."
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pacomartin
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April 18th, 2012 at 1:32:33 PM permalink
Quote: aluisio

I think you are missing a pronom in your sentence. It would be better suited as: "Me aloca cuando alguien llama día de Acción de Gracias "día de los pavos".

Me aloca que haya tanta gente mala en el mundo.



Me aloca que cuando te olvidas de los pronombres reflexivos.

Alocar means to drive someone crazy, alocarse means to drive yourself crazy.


The word is showing up very rarely in the corpus. I don't know why it isn't more popular.


There are actually a lot of English words that seem extremely useful, but that nobody uses.
aeolist a pompous bore who thinks he is inspired
blandiloquent speaking in an ingratiating manner
farctate stuffed or filled solid with food, opposite of hollow
Nareed
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April 18th, 2012 at 1:42:18 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Me aloca que cuando te olvidas de los pronombres reflexivos.



This reads liek a sentence fragment, or an inocmplete sentence. What you said was "It drives me crazy that when you forget the refelxive pronouns."

Naturally the listener or reader would wonder, "That when you forget the reflexive pronouns what?" or "Que cuando te olvidas de los pronombres reflexivos ¿que?"
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aluisio
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April 18th, 2012 at 1:50:35 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Me aloca que cuando te olvidas de los pronombres reflexivos.


Es verdad, gracias! No más me olvidaré de ellos.
Pero ´que cuando´ és una buena construcción?
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pacomartin
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April 18th, 2012 at 2:11:47 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

This reads liek a sentence fragment, or an inocmplete sentence. What you said was "It drives me crazy that when you forget the refelxive pronouns."

Naturally the listener or reader would wonder, "That when you forget the reflexive pronouns what?" or "Que cuando te olvidas de los pronombres reflexivos ¿que?"



I was trying to say "It drives me crazy when you forget the reflexive pronoun". I wasn't sure if I should include "que".

Is this sentence correct?
Me aloca cuando te olvidas de los pronombres reflexivos.

English doesn't put as much importance on reflexive structure.
Nareed
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April 18th, 2012 at 2:14:28 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Is this sentence correct?
Me aloca cuando te olvidas de los pronombres reflexivos.



That one's fine.
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Wizard
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April 19th, 2012 at 6:19:00 AM permalink
Fecha: 04-19-12
Palabra: plis-plas


It was hard to find a dictionary that had this one, but wordreference.com says it means "instant" or "moment."

The question for the advanced readers is how does plis-plas differ from instante y momento?

Ejemplo time.

Dije "¿Quieres tomar algo?," pero ella dijo "no" en un plis-plas. = I said "Would you like something to drink?," but she said "no" in an instant.
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Nareed
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April 19th, 2012 at 6:24:20 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It was hard to find a dictionary that had this one, but wordreference.com says it means "instant" or "moment."



I think that's a non-word, like "plop-plop, fizz-fizz." It means something, but it isn't formally part of the language.

Quote:

The question for the advanced readers is how does plis-plas differ from instante y momento?



Well, "instante" means "instant" and "momento" means "moment." They mean pretty much the same thing as they do in English.

Quote:

Dije "¿Quieres tomar algo?," pero ella dijo "no" en un plis-plas. = I said "Would you like something to drink?," but she said "no" in an instant.



Seems all ok to me.
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April 19th, 2012 at 6:32:13 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I think that's a non-word, like "plop-plop, fizz-fizz." It means something, but it isn't formally part of the language.



Oh what a relief it is! I doubt anyone under the age of 40 in the U.S. is familiar with that expression, and everyone over 40 can never forget it.

We all know where that comes from, but how about plis-plas? Paco, I think this one is for you.
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pacomartin
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April 19th, 2012 at 7:08:14 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Oh what a relief it is! I doubt anyone under the age of 40 in the U.S. is familiar with that expression, and everyone over 40 can never forget it.

We all know where that comes from, but how about plis-plas? Paco, I think this one is for you.



Onomatopoeia is the use of words that imitate the sounds associated with the objects or actions they refer to such as: hiss, murmur,buzz, beep, whirr, click, clack, clunk, clatter, clink, boing, varoom/vroom, whoosh, swish, swoosh, zap, zing, zip, and zoom.

The following list shows the sounds made by various "Spanish-speaking" animals. Special verb forms, where they exist, are in parenthesis following the word(s) for the sound. English forms follow the dash:

abeja (bee): bzzz (zumbar) buzz
búho (owl): uu uu (ulular) who, hoo, hoot
burro (donkey): iii-aah (rebuznar) heehaw
caballo (horse): jiiiiiii, iiiiou (relinchar) neigh, n-a-a-a-y
cabra (goat): bee bee (balar) b-a-a-a-a
cerdo (pig): oink-oink, oinc-oinc (grunir) oink
cuco (cuckoo): cúcu-cúcu cuckoo
cuervo (crow): cruaaac-cruaaac caw
gallina (hen): coc co co coc (cacarear), kara-kara-kara-kara cluck
gallo (rooster): kikirikí, ki-kiri-ki (cantar) cock-a-doodle-doo
gato (cat): miau (maullar) meow
león (lion): grrrr, grgrgr (rugir) roar, growl
oveja (sheep): bee, mee (balar) b-a-a-a-h
mono (monkey): i-i-i
paloma (dove): cu-curru-cu-cú (arrullar)) coo
pato (duck): cuac cuac quack
pavo (turkey): gluglú gobble
perro (dog): guau guau, guau (ladrar) bark, bow-wow, arf, ruff
pollito (chick): pío pío chirp
rana (frog): cruá cruá, berp, croac (croar) ribbit, croak
tigre (tiger): ggggrrrr, grgrgr (rugir) roar, growl
vaca (cow): mu, muuu (mugir) moo

The phrase "en un plis plas" figuratively means the same as "in the blink of an eye".

Frankly, the etymology of such words is difficult too trace in any language. Words like "moo" are first recorded almost 5 centuries ago, but etymologists simply say they are imitative.


[
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April 19th, 2012 at 7:31:36 AM permalink
So, I assume because one could say "plis-plas" fast that it refers to as long as it takes to say it. Kind of like how every Jib Jab video starts with them saying "jib jab" quickly.
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pacomartin
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April 19th, 2012 at 8:52:44 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So, I assume because one could say "plis-plas" fast that it refers to as long as it takes to say it.



It sound reasonable, but I can't confirm.

In English yum yum
In Spanish, ñam ñam

In English, thump thump
In Spanish, bum bum bum

In English hush, shh
In Spanish chitón cht

In English: mwah, smooch
In Spanish, mua or muac, chuik (South America)

In English, hahah, heh heh, hohoho, (tee)heehee
In Spanish, jajaja, jejeje

In English, honk honk, beep beep, toot toot
In Spanish, pi pi, pip pip

In English, knock knock
In Spanish, toc toc


God be with ye (late 14c.)
godbwye (1570s)
good-bye (1590s)
bye ?
bye-bye (1790)
buh-bye ?
Nareed
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April 19th, 2012 at 9:59:41 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Oh what a relief it is! I doubt anyone under the age of 40 in the U.S. is familiar with that expression, and everyone over 40 can never forget it.



Remind me to use "ka ching" next time :)

Seriously, I don't know where I got that from. I take it there was an ad, but I don't recall seeing it.

Quote:

We all know where that comes from, but how about plis-plas? Paco, I think this one is for you.



I don't think it's onomatopeia. I'd never come across it before.
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pacomartin
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April 19th, 2012 at 10:18:57 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I don't think it's onomatopeia. I'd never come across it before.



Onomatopeia is a subclass of the concept of ideophone. Onomatopeia is designed to imitate the sound of something (mechanical, animal, or natural) .But ideophones are words used by speakers to evoke an impression, not necessarily limited to mimicry.

In English bling-bling, badonkadonk, hippetyhop, and 'jib jab' would be ideaphones. They don't necessarily imitate a sound, but they give a strong impression.
Nareed
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April 19th, 2012 at 10:26:05 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Onomatopeia is a subclass of the concept of ideophone.



Sorry. I do know what onomatopeia is.

I meant I don't think "plis-plas" is onomatopeia of anything,a nd I've never come across the term before.

BTW "yum yum" in Mexico is "yom yom." There was an ice cream chain with that trademark (long, long gone).
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April 19th, 2012 at 10:59:59 AM permalink
The book I'm reading now in Spanish is a translation of the English Diary of a Wimpy Kid. Every page has at least one cartoon, often with sound-effect type words. Here are just some examples:

Punch (as in the sound of a punch) = Paf
Gaah (English) = Oh, No (Spanish). That is no typo, "Oh, No" was the Spanish.
Yeah = Eso
Shoot = Uaaah
Zzzzz (as in the sound of snoring) = Zzzzz
Whew = Ah Sí
Grunt = Grrrr
Vroom (from a vacuum cleaner) = Bruuuum

I could go on and on.

Quote: Nareed

Remind me to use "ka ching" next time :)

Seriously, I don't know where I got that from. I take it there was an ad, but I don't recall seeing it.



As you probably know, that is a sound effect for suddenly coming into money. It probably dates back to the sound old cash registers made when opened. In the episode of Frasier where they went on Antique Roadshow, the father made that sound when they said whatever he showed them was worth a lot.
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Nareed
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April 19th, 2012 at 11:02:51 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

As you probably know, that is a sound effect for suddenly coming into money. It probably dates back to the sound old cash registers made when opened. In the episode of Frasier where they went on Antique Roadshow, the father made that sound when they said whatever he showed them was worth a lot.



I must have really slept badly last night. Or maybe spending half the morning at the bank turned my brain to mush. I'm usually more clear than this. My apologies.

What I don't know where I got it from was the alka-seltzer sound, not the cash resgister one. The latter has been very popular these past few years.
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pacomartin
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April 19th, 2012 at 2:39:47 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Sorry. I do know what onomatopeia is.



Onomatopoeia in English is onomatopeya in Spanish and is from the Greek onomatopoiia

from onomato "word, name"
+ a derivative of poiein "compose, make" (as in poet).

They are the class of words where the sound of the word mimics the sound that you are describing.
Cock-a-Doodle-Doo is thought to sound like the crow of a rooster.


An ideaphone is a more general word, in that it is a sound (Phone in Greek) that gives you a strong idea or image

Ba-dunk-a-dunk doesn't sound like anything, but it goes with the image of a girl with an attractive, but large butt.
The word pissant originally was a kind of an ant, but it conjures up a certain image, so that for the most of the last 5 centuries it is used to mean a contemptible person.

Nareed, What's up with your volcano?
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April 20th, 2012 at 9:36:47 AM permalink
Fecha: 20-04-12
Palabra: Infarto


Today's SWD means "heart attack"

I'm not sure if it is acceptable Spanish to just say infarto, or if you should say the full infarto de miocardio. In the context I found the word they just had infarto, and it was used in a non-literal way, as in "I was so shocked I almost had a heart attack."

Ejemplo time.

¿Quieres almorzar a la Parrilla de Infarto? = Would you like to have lunch at the Heart Attack Grill?



In other news, I had my second tutoring session with the Peru tutor yesterday. Boy, was I an alumno horrible. First I tortured her for 10 minutes on the "He must like eggs question." She kept going back and forth. Either way, I challenged her explanations. Finally she admitted she really didn't know the correct Spanish for that. Over the two hours I laid on the ¿por qué? questions pretty heavy. At one point she said "You're giving me a headache." Many times I taught her Spanish words she didn't know.

When it came time to wrap up she said that my Spanish was much further along that her usual beginner students, and that maybe I should see somebody who is more qualified than her. I said "no," that I wanted to stick with her, and I would behave myself better next time.

Oh, and Gavin MacLoud is still on the bulletin board, and I didn't take him.
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Nareed
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April 20th, 2012 at 10:08:54 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Nareed, What's up with your volcano?



It's not mine ;P

As far as I see, it's realeasing pent-up stress and spewing ash and water vapor.
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pacomartin
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April 20th, 2012 at 10:11:52 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

There are actually a lot of English words that seem extremely useful, but that nobody uses.
aeolist a pompous bore who thinks he is inspired
blandiloquent speaking in an ingratiating manner
farctate stuffed or filled solid with food, opposite of hollow



A variant of the third word that I mentioned is infarction which is part of the proper term for heart attack, myocardial infarction. In this case it is not stuffed with food, but the aorta is stuffed with a blockage so that blood does not get to the heart.

If your new tutor is just a native language speaker, don't torment her with obscure grammar questions and strange vocabulary. Try one of those exercises where you talk in the preterite tense. Pretend you are ordering food at a bar. See if you can teach her a game in Spanish.

An exericse where they give you the infinitive, and you fill in the preterite or the imperfect tense.
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April 20th, 2012 at 10:27:45 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means "heart attack"

I'm not sure if it is acceptable Spanish to just say infarto, or if you should say the full infarto de miocardio. In the context I found the word they just had infarto, and it was used in a non-literal way, as in "I was so shocked I almost had a heart attack."



Here I have to go agaisnt usage.

Heart attack is trsnalted as "ataque al corazón."

"Infarto" means, I think, "infarction." Meaning a blockage in a blood vessel which causes a major problem in the body. When it happens in the myocardium, whatever the hell that is, it causes a heart attack. Ok, I don't know if it can't ahppen elsewhere and cause a hert attack. but "miocardio" means myocardium as far as I know. In the brain it causes a stroke ("derrame cerebral" in Spanish). Or maybe it measn the damaged tissue that results from a blickage. Soopoo ought to weigh in here.

Quote:

¿Quieres almorzar a la Parrilla de Infarto? = Would you like to have lunch at the Heart Attack Grill?



That's literally ok.

However, by usage "grill" as in a restaurant that grill food, isn't called "parrilla." For instance, a "bar and grill" woule be called "restaurante bar," or "restaurant y bar;" assuming it isn't just called "cantina." There was a taco restaurant called "La Parrilla Suiza," but that was an exception.

Point is, i can't think fo a good translation for "heat attack grill." Let me gve it some thought and I'll post back later.

Quote:

When it came time to wrap up she said that my Spanish was much further along that her usual beginner students, and that maybe I should see somebody who is more qualified than her. I said "no," that I wanted to stick with her, and I would behave myself better next time.



Do Paco and I get any credit for that? ;)
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pacomartin
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April 20th, 2012 at 11:00:57 AM permalink
Wiz,
You might want to read these articles aloud from "El Comercio" the best selling newspaper in Peru. Try to ask all your questions in Spanish "Como se dice", "Cual es un otra palabra para ..."


Quote: Gastronomía

Segunda edición de feria gastronómica "Invita Perú" espera 100 mil personas

Habrá alrededor de 250 establecimientos en los 6 mil metros cuadrados destinados en el Centro Comercial Mega Plaza

Se anunció la segunda edición de la feria gastronómica Invita Perú:http://elcomercio.pe/tag/274976/invita-peru. Esta se realizará en el Centro Comercial Mega Plaza del 23 de junio al 1 de julio y, dicen los organizadores, esperan la asistencia de más de 100 mil personas en los 6 mil metros cuadrados que tendrá el evento.

Este lugar de concentración gastronómica está dedicado a promover y estimular la calidad entre los negocios de comida emergentes en distintas zonas del país. Han confirmado su asistencia 150 establecimientos, entre los que encontrará todo tipo de comida, desde huariques hasta escuelas profesionales de cocina, además de unos 100 puestos más para proveedores.

También habrá actividades para toda la familia. Disfrutará de show musicales, conferencias, charlas magistrales, concursos, entre otras cosas.




Quote: Tecnología

El Homo erectus ya sufría de tuberculosis hace medio millón de años

Un cráneo de este hombre primitivo hallado en Turquía contenía huellas de una meningitis provocada por la enfermedad

Berlín (EFE). El hombre primitivo, concretamente el Homo erectus, sufría ya tuberculosis hace medio millón de años, según anunció hoy un portavoz de la universidad alemana de Medicina de Gotinga.

Ello se desprende de los análisis realizados al cráneo hallado en Turquía de un Homo erectus en el que se encontraron huellas de una meningitis provocada por tuberculosis.

El equipo científico de Gotinga subrayó que hasta ahora se pensaba que ese tipo de infección bacteriana no surgió hasta hace algunos miles de años en el hombre moderno.

HALLAZGO HISTÓRICO

El paleopatólogo alemán Michael Schultz, responsable del estudio, comentó que si los análisis preliminares se confirman se trataría de la más antigua tuberculosis conocida en un ser humano y el primer caso en un hombre de la edad de piedra.

Desde el punto de vista morfológico es algo muy probable, ya que las huellas halladas en la parte frontal interior del cráneo presentan indicios de una meningitis provocada por una tuberculosis, señaló el catedrático alemán.

El cráneo en cuestión fue encontrado en 2004 por un equipo internacional científico en una cantera de piedra al oeste de Turquía.

Los expertos consideran que los restos óseos pertenecieron a un hombre de entre 18 y 30 años de edad procedente de África y de piel oscura que vivió hace medio millón de años.




Quote: Mundo

Avión con 131 personas a bordo se estrelló en Pakistán

Se desconoce número de fallecidos. El vuelo era comercial y se habría precipitado a causa del mal clima

Islamabad (Agencias). Un avión con 131 personas a bordo (122 pasajeros y 9 tripulantes) se estrelló hoy en las afueras de la capital de Pakistán, Islamabad, a las 9:00 a.m. (hora peruana) a causa de las malas condiciones meteorológicas, según informaron fuentes policiales.

Anteriormente se había hablado de 127 personas. En el lugar del accidente, a unos 20 kilómetros al sur de Islamabad, hay cadáveres por todas partes, dijo un portavoz de un equipo de rescate, que consideró que no hay supervivientes.

El avión cayó en un pueblo, provocando también numerosas víctimas entre sus habitantes, por lo que calcula que las víctimas se elevarán a alrededor de 150.

Según las autoridades de aviación civil, el avión del tipo Boeing 727 pertenecía a la aerolínea privada Bhoja Air y cubría la ruta entre la ciudad portuaria de Karachi, en el sur del país, a la capital Islamabad, dijo el portavoz Pervez George.




Quote: Politica

"Fue un golpe para nosotros", afirmó ministro Otárola sobre imágenes de 'Gabriel' en la prensa

Titular de Defensa contó que tras ataque a helicóptero donde iba capitana PNP Nancy Flores, este fue arrojado a un abismo por fuerzas del orden para evitar fotografías victoriosas de senderistas

¿Por qué un grupo de periodistas y no las fuerzas del orden encontraron esta semana a Martín Quispe Palomino Gabriel en una zona del agreste VRAE?

Para el ministro de Defensa, Alberto Otárola, la respuesta es que no se encontraron probablemente con ningún efectivo del orden porque esa zona estaba minada, motivo por el cual hay que agradecer a Dios que no les haya reventado (a los periodistas) una mina.

Otárola también señaló que el gobierno y las fuerzas del orden ignoraban que estos periodistas iban hacia Alto Lagunas y aclaró que no hubo objeción de su parte al trabajo de la prensa.

No hay ninguna objeción al trabajo de prensa realizado, simplemente he pedido una segunda reflexión al momento de propalar sus imágenes. Me impactaron las imágenes de los uniformes de los policías, porque los policías tienen padres y tienen hijos. Si la prensa decidió publicar el informe completo y un manifiesto abominable de un asesino, es decisión de la prensa y la respeto, expresó en entrevista a La República.

Al ser consultado sobre si el gobierno sintió un golpe porque los periodistas encontraron a Gabriel, mientras el Ejecutivo informaba que 1.500 efectivos lo buscaban por aire y tierra, Otárola respondió: Puedo asumir que sentimos el golpe, pero la reacción fue ante la imagen propalada.

PRECISIONES SOBRE HELICÓPTERO
En otro momento, el titular del sector confirmó que el helicóptero que hallaron los periodistas es el que llevó a la capitana PNP Nancy Flores, quien murió baleada por una columna senderista.

Al respecto, dijo que el gobierno no ocultó el derribamiento de la nave y que dio cuenta de ese hecho el mismo día. Asimismo, que tras el ataque los policías que estaban ahí se pusieron a buen recaudo, recuperaron a la capitana y repelieron el ataque. Luego viene otro helicóptero y lleva a la capitana y a los heridos a Kiteni, agregó.

Para rechazar cualquier posibilidad de toma de armamento o de fotografías victoriosas, se inutiliza la nave y se arroja al abismo, que es el sitio donde los periodistas tomaron las fotos", contó.

No obstante, informó que de todas maneras se investigará por qué la nave en la que iba Flores sobrevolaba sin ser escoltada por otra.

También informó que el año pasado se consiguieron tres helicópteros blindados para la lucha contra el narcoterrorismo. Una de las grandes preocupaciones que vamos a resolver, esperamos que sea en este y en el próximo año, es la adquisición de estas naves que son las más idóneas para una geografía tan compleja como la del Perú, dijo.

Sobre si es cierto que, como informaron medios periodísticos, los dos policías desaparecidos fueron abandonados por su superior en plena selva, dijo que la denuncia será investigada.

CHALECOS INSERVIBLES
También dijo que será inflexible con quienes hayan arriesgado la vida de nuestros soldados comprando chalecos antibalas sin el dispositivo de metal que garantiza su efectividad.

He ordenado que este tema vaya a la Contraloría. Voy a ser inflexible con quienes han arriesgado la vida de nuestros soldados adquiriendo material que no correspondía a los requerimientos y a las características que tiene que tener una zona tan compleja como el Valle de los ríos Apurímac y Ene, respondió.

NUEVA ESTRATEGIA
Sobre las nuevas disposiciones para hacer más efectiva la labor de las fuerzas combinadas en el VRAE, precisó que se está variando la política. Según dijo, en las últimas operaciones en esta zona las incursiones de las patrullas son nocturnas para evitar las emboscadas.

Estamos trabajando un plan operativo del VRAE que va a dar resultado. Esta incursión del clan Quispe Palomino en Kepasiato, más allá de lo lamentable y los errores, creo que también puede ser una respuesta al rompimiento de la situación de sinergia que ha hecho el gobierno en el VRAE, añadió.

pacomartin
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April 20th, 2012 at 11:21:03 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

However, by usage "grill" as in a restaurant that grill food, isn't called "parrilla." For instance, a "bar and grill" woule be called "restaurante bar," or "restaurant y bar;" assuming it isn't just called "cantina." There was a taco restaurant called "La Parrilla Suiza," but that was an exception.



Speaking of hamburgers, do you go to this trendy neighborhood?

Sobrinos is an offshoot of the ever-popular see-and-be-seen Condesa venue Primos. Their menus are similar. While the name may conger up a Greek diner or a local mafia hangout, the food is mostly Mexican nicely presented, satisfying. The subtitle cocina del barrio implies informality, a menu for sharing with friends. Divided into surf and turf, the bill of fare offers light Mexican classic antojitos such as tacos, tostadas, and seafood cocktails. A few heartier international dishes such as camarones marinera or steak tartare change with the season. My favorite from the sandwich section is the dense and savory updated Jalisco classic torta ahogada de pato. A crusty hunk of baguette is filled with duck carnitas and bathed in a spicy red salsa you eat it with a knife and fork. I 've noticed that designer hamburgers have arrived in Mexico with a vengeance. The burger here was excellent. The meat is generously thick and of good quality, mercifully served on good crusty bread instead of a pillowy bun. The golden, crispy papas fritas on the side were much appreciated. The wine list is varied and prices are reasonable. Sobrinos sports the newly discovered (here in Mexico) retro bistro décor old fashioned mosaic floors, wooden café tables with mis-matched chairs, chalkboard menus, and, thank goodness, no TVs in sight. Its a welcome addition to the neighborhood. Update (2012):

A new member of the family, Padrinos, is located in the lovely patio in the centro at Isabel la Católica 30.
Nareed
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April 20th, 2012 at 11:30:03 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Speaking of hamburgers, do you go to this trendy neighborhood?



Condesa? I know it, but I don't go there often. My electrologist is nearby, though.

Mostly I don't go out to eat any more. I like my own cooking very much, and it conforms perfectly to my diet.

As for burgers, there are some nice places here and there. There's an older restaurant called "Embers" that has served a large variety of burgers for at least 30 years.
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April 20th, 2012 at 3:47:23 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Heart attack is trsnalted as "ataque al corazón."



I saw that in the preparation for my OP, but decided not to confuse the issue by bringing it up. In defense of infarto, here is the sentence where I found it.

Cuando vi mi tira cómica, casi me da un infarto. The original English was, "And when I saw my comic strip, I practically had a heart attack.

Quote:

Do Paco and I get any credit for that? ;)



Absolutely! You guys have been a huge help.

Regarding the newspaper from Peru, that is a good idea. However, I've got a big pile of kids' books in Spanish, and I'm pretty comfortable working through those. An adult newspaper would probably be rather heavy, and thus slow moving to get through.
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Nareed
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April 20th, 2012 at 4:19:37 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I saw that in the preparation for my OP, but decided not to confuse the issue by bringing it up. In defense of infarto, here is the sentence where I found it.

Cuando vi mi tira cómica, casi me da un infarto. The original English was, "And when I saw my comic strip, I practically had a heart attack.



That's why I said I was going against usage. In every day usage, people do mean a heart attack when saying "infarto," or "infartar" about 99% of the time. But for accuracy I explained it means something else.


Quote:

Absolutely! You guys have been a huge help.



Good! It's nice to know I can help. Let's see if we can hurry things up once I'm in Vegas.
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April 20th, 2012 at 5:02:11 PM permalink
Per Nareed's question, here is what SOOPOO said by PM

Quote: SOOPOO

Infarction just means'dead area'. Myocardial refers to the heart muscle. So a myocardial infarction is an area of dead heart muscle. A pulmonary infarction would be dead lung tissue, etc... MI is shorthand for myocardial infarction, and is commonly referred to as a 'heart attack'. If the muscle is stressed but not dead yet that is referred to as angina. Angina, or chest pain, is often a sign of an MI or a soon to be MI.

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pacomartin
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April 20th, 2012 at 8:01:08 PM permalink
Quote: SOOPOO

MI is shorthand for myocardial infarction, and is commonly referred to as a 'heart attack'.



Speaking linguistically, English speakers only assigned the nickname "heart attack" to mean MI in the 1930's.

The medical definition of infarct (n.) is from 1873, from Latin infartus, past participle of infarcire "to stuff into," from in- + farcire to stuff .
Farce is a cognate, because it was originally a comic interlude stuffed into a serious, often religious play.

I am not disputing SOOPOO's definition. The word infarction is now associated with necrosis (or death of local tissue), but the idea of death is not inherent in the word.

I find it interesting that Spanish speakers did not develop a nick-name for the condition. It has pretty casual usage in English, you can say "You nearly gave me a heart attack", and not be morbid. I don't know if infarto is used as casually in everyday speech.
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April 20th, 2012 at 9:07:12 PM permalink
Fecha: 21-04-12
Palabra: Quicio


Today's SWD means doorjamb.

I'm sure you're thinking at this time, why is Mike worried about an obscure word like doorjamb? It started when I came across this sentence with my tutor.

Lo que me saca de quicio es que Chris se fuma al menos un paquete de cigarrillos al día.

Once my tutor said that saca de quicio was a figure of speech for "infuriate," the rest fell into place.

The question for the advanced readers is ¿Por qué? Is there something especially infuriating about removing doorjambs? I guess if it really got stuck under the door it would be frustrating getting it out.

Ejemplo time.

Saqué de quicio cuando Tom Brady tiró eso pase para un seguridad. = I was furious when Tom Brady threw that pass for a safety.

I'm sure that isn't the right word for a "safety." How do they say it Mexico?
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April 20th, 2012 at 9:32:04 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means doorjamb.



It actually does. I had no idea. I thought it meant something like sanity or mind because:

Quote:

I'm sure you're thinking at this time, why is Mike worried about an obscure word like doorjamb? It started when I came across this sentence with my tutor.

Lo que me saca de quicio es que Chris se fuma al menos un paquete de cigarrillos al día.



That's the only way I've ever heard it used.

Quote:

The question for the advanced readers is ¿Por qué? Is there something especially infuriating about removing doorjambs? I guess if it really got stuck under the door it would be frustrating getting it out.



No idea. As I said, I didn't even know what it meant.

Quote:

Saqué de quicio cuando Tom Brady tiró eso pase para un seguridad. = I was furious when Tom Brady threw that pass for a safety.



"Me sacó de quicio que Tom Brady tiró ese pase para un safety."

We went through something like this recently, but I forget the details. To say "I was furious when..." you'd go with "enfurecí cuando..."

Quote:

I'm sure that isn't the right word for a "safety." How do they say it Mexico?



We say "safety."
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pacomartin
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April 20th, 2012 at 9:40:19 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Once my tutor said that saca de quicio was a figure of speech for "infuriate," the rest fell into place.

The question for the advanced readers is ¿Por qué? Is there something especially infuriating about removing doorjambs? I guess if it really got stuck under the door it would be frustrating getting it out.



A doorjamb is the vertical portion of the frame onto which a door is secured. The jamb bears the weight of the door through its hinges, and most types of door latches and deadbolts extend into a recess in the doorjamb when engaged, making the "true" (leveling) and strength of the doorjambs vitally important to the overall operational durability and security of the door.
The word "jamb" comes from the French "jambe", meaning "leg".



I don't think sacar means "to remove" in this idiom. I think the first definition is more appropriate. The image I get is that the door jamb is moved out of place resulting in the door sticking, or swinging open on it's own accord. Either behavior would be infuriating.

As we said earlier, it is not clear where all the English idioms come from either. If you say "your nose is out of joint", I don't know exactly how the literal meaning is related to the figurative meaning.


Quote: DRAE: sacar


1. tr. Poner algo fuera del lugar donde estaba encerrado o contenido.
2. tr. Quitar, apartar a alguien o algo del sitio o condición en que se halla. Sacar al niño de la escuela. Sacar de un apuro.
3. tr. Aprender, averiguar, resolver algo por medio del estudio. Sacar la cuenta.
4. tr. Conocer, descubrir, hallar por señales e indicios. Sacar por el rastro.
5. tr. Hacer con fuerza o con maña que alguien diga o dé algo.
6. tr. Extraer de una cosa alguno de los principios o partes que la componen o constituyen. Sacar aceite de almendras.
7. tr. Elegir por sorteo o por pluralidad de votos. Sacar alcalde.
8. tr. Ganar por suerte algo. Sacar un premio de la lotería.
9. tr. Conseguir, lograr, obtener algo.
10. tr. Comprar algo, como un billete, una entrada, etc.
11. tr. Dicho de una persona, de un animal o de una cosa: Aventajar a otro u otra en lo que se expresa.
12. tr. Alargar, adelantar algo. Antonio saca el pecho cuando anda.
13. tr. Ensanchar o alargar una prenda de vestir.
14. tr. Exceptuar, excluir.
15. tr. Copiar o trasladar lo que está escrito.
16. tr. Hacer una fotografía o retrato.
17. tr. Mostrar, manifestar algo.
18. tr. Quitar algo que afea o perjudica. Sacar una mancha, una enfermedad.
19. tr. Citar, nombrar, traer al discurso o a la conversación. Los pedantes sacan todo cuanto saben, aunque no venga al caso.
20. tr. Ganar al juego. Sacar la polla, la puesta.
21. tr. Producir, criar, inventar, imitar algo. Sacar una máquina, una moda, una copia, un bordado, pollos.
22. tr. Desenvainar un arma.
23. tr. Hacer perder el conocimiento y el juicio. Esa pasión te saca DE ti.
24. tr. Librar a alguien de algo. Sacar DE cuidados, DE pobre.
25. tr. Dar a la pelota o al balón el impulso inicial, sea al comienzo del partido o en los lances en que así lo exigen las reglas del juego.
26. tr. En el juego de pelota, arrojarla desde el rebote que da en el saque hacia los contrarios que la han de volver.
27. tr. Apuntar o escribir aparte una cita, una nota, una autoridad.
28. tr. Aplicar, atribuir un apodo, un mote, una falta, etc.
29. tr. Volver a lavar la ropa después de pasarla por la colada para aclararla, antes de tenderla y enjugarla.
30. tr. Méx. reprochar.
31. prnl. Méx. quitarse (‖ irse de un lugar).

pacomartin
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April 20th, 2012 at 9:44:10 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That's the only way I've ever heard it used.



It seems like a fairly common idiom
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April 20th, 2012 at 10:07:46 PM permalink
I thought the frame for the door was called a "door frame." I thought the doorjamb was a rubber triangular shaped thing you used to prop open doors, lest gravity, wind, or air pressure cause them to close. It seems old houses often utilize them.
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pacomartin
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April 20th, 2012 at 10:26:37 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought the frame for the door was called a "door frame." I thought the doorjamb was a rubber triangular shaped thing you used to prop open doors, lest gravity, wind, or air pressure cause them to close. It seems old houses often utilize them.



I couldn't understand your comment, that's why I posted the picture. I think you are thinking of a "door stop".
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April 20th, 2012 at 10:37:30 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I couldn't understand your comment, that's why I posted the picture.



I thought the picture was in error, but evidently I am, again.
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pacomartin
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April 20th, 2012 at 10:48:37 PM permalink
Dad came unhinged when he saw the report card.

That's as close as I can think of for an English language idiom that is similar to the Spanish one.
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April 21st, 2012 at 5:22:35 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought the frame for the door was called a "door frame." I thought the doorjamb was a rubber triangular shaped thing you used to prop open doors, lest gravity, wind, or air pressure cause them to close. It seems old houses often utilize them.



Doors have been around for a few millennia. Surely by you could write a big fat book of doors, merely explaining all components on all kinds of doors and what they do (I didn't claim it would be an interesting book).

FWIW I think the "door jamb" is the place in the frame where there's a mechanism to keep the door closed.

Paco, really, was that last image necessary in any way in this thread?
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April 21st, 2012 at 6:20:52 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Doors have been around for a few millennia. Surely by you could write a big fat book of doors, merely explaining all components on all kinds of doors and what they do (I didn't claim it would be an interesting book).



I didn't even know what a doorjamb was -- in English. The subject clearly doesn't interest me much. I do like the music of The Doors.

Speaking of idioms about door parts, there is also "dumb as a doorknob."

Somehow I think this is not our first Sarah Palin image we've seen in this thread. This is getting way off topic, but if you're going to try to take your life with a gun, that is not how to do it. The correct way is to put the muzzle in your mouth and point up, towards the brain. The idea is not let the skull get in the way and possibly make the bullet lose its trajectory.
Extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence. -- Carl Sagan
pacomartin
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April 21st, 2012 at 9:10:22 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

FWIW I think the "door jamb" is the place in the frame where there's a mechanism to keep the door closed.
Paco, really, was that last image necessary in any way in this thread?





Sorry about the image, I started to write something but I was called away. In English you might have an idiom like "screw loose" which implies a kind of mild eccentricity. If something "drives you crazy" it is sort of ambigious how strong your reaction is to the offending person/noise/conversation/crying . But we usually reserve "unhinged" for someone who is about to do something genuinely insane (like the Sarah Palin image).

There is nothing inherent in the idiom that would let you know that "screw loose" implies some loopy behavior, while "unhinged" implies a potential sociopathic or psychotic person.

In one sense it would be convenient to equate "sacar de quicio" == "unhinged" since they both involved making a door unstable from it's designated purpose, but I don't know how strong the phrase is in Mexico.

Judging by the images associated with the phrase "sacar de quicio", it is used a little more playfully than "unhinged" is in English.

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April 21st, 2012 at 3:32:31 PM permalink
What does this mean:? Juan pagara el pato en nombre de nuestra amistad.
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April 21st, 2012 at 3:35:39 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

What does this mean:? Juan pagara el pato en nombre de nuestra amistad.



It means Juan will be scapegoated.
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April 21st, 2012 at 4:30:59 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

It means Juan will be scapegoated.



What about the duck? Word for word, how would you translate it?
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April 21st, 2012 at 4:52:31 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Word for word, how would you translate it?


Well, for that, Google might work:

"John paid the duck in the name of our friendship."
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April 21st, 2012 at 5:32:10 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

"John paid the duck in the name of our friendship."



Did they have ducks in biblical times? I'm wondering if both expressions might be based on animal sacrifice, as way of atonement.

I may have to call in teddys.
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