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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 2nd, 2011 at 7:23:32 PM permalink
Thanks for the quick and detailed replies. What is the difference between vergüenza and lastima?
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Nareed
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July 2nd, 2011 at 7:51:34 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks for the quick and detailed replies. What is the difference between vergüenza and lastima?



Vergüenza = shame

Lástima = pity

Lastima = hurts (third person singular). Sometimes you have to mind the accents...
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Wizard
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August 28th, 2011 at 10:11:25 AM permalink
I think it is time to despertar (wake up) the Spanish Word of the Day thread from its vacación verano (summer vacation). One of my trips this summer was my annual week in Santa Barbara. So, for lack of a better idea, let's look at some street names of the city I love so much.

An interesting thing about Santa Barbara is that the downtown streets don't run north to south, and east to west, as in most cities. Rather they run NE to SW, and NW to SE. Let's start at the beach and move our way in the NE direction, looking at the streets parallel to State Street. We'll skip over English names, names of people, and Spanish words that are too easy.

We'll skip castillo, as being a fairly obvious cognate for castle. The next one is De La Vina. Proper Spanish would use an ñ, but that usually gets changed incorrectly to an n by us gringos. So I would translate De La Viña to "from the vineyard." A related word is one many people know, vino = wine.

Para Ejemplo, Me gusta comprar vino directamente de la viña = I like to buy wine directly from the vineyard.
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Nareed
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August 28th, 2011 at 10:44:39 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I think it is time to despertar (wake up) the Spanish Word of the Day thread from its vacación verano (summer vacation).



That would be "vacación DE verano."


Quote:

Para Ejemplo, Me gusta comprar vino directamente de la viña = I like to buy wine directly from the vineyard.



Very good. As an aside, another word is "viñedo."

For related words, Spanish parts company with English when it comes to "vintage," the spanish word is "cosecha" meaning also "harvest." This refers to the year the grapes were harvested and the wine made.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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August 28th, 2011 at 10:55:16 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That would be "vacación DE verano."



Yes. I've made that mistake many times. When using a noun as an adjective you put the de in front of it.

Thanks for the additional comments -- good stuff!
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Nareed
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August 28th, 2011 at 12:19:40 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Yes. I've made that mistake many times. When using a noun as an adjective you put the de in front of it.



Some friends and I once spent a week trying to determine what the word "dashboard" meant in Spanish. Finally I used a dictionary :) But the English word I once had massive trouble with was the past tense of the verb "to do." Asking something simple like "¿que hiciste ayer?" was a bit of an adventure. I almost always forgot and would ask "What did you yesterday?" It just takes time and practice.
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Wizard
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August 29th, 2011 at 5:43:32 AM permalink
Going through the map of Santa Barbara I come across some streets that appear to have Spanish names, but I can't find a translation for them.

First there is Chapala Street, a major downtown street you hear of all the time there. I have no idea what it means.

Next there is Salsipuedes Street. I know that puedes means roughly "you can." I'm not sure what the "salsi" part means. Maybe it means "Can you do the Salsa?"

Then we come to Quarantina Street. My guess was this was a cognate for quarantine. Either somebody has really bad spelling, or it just means something else. The correct word for quarantine in Spanish is cuarentena. My guess is somebody doesn't know how to spell.

Let's skip over Nopal. That is the name of a cactus, that I believe is the same in both English and Spanish.

I think we can finally learn something when we get to Milpas Street. A milpa is the Spanish word for a corn field. I've never once seen anyone grow corn anywhere close to Santa Barbara, but I imagine way back when they may have found corn a more practical crop than today's grapes and avocados.

Perhaps what I should do is buy a copy of Street Names of Santa Barbara before going further with the Santa Barbara theme.

Ejemplo time.

El extraterrestre se puso un círculo de cosecha en mi milpa. = The alien put a crop circle in my corn field.
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Alan
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August 29th, 2011 at 6:48:12 AM permalink
Salsipuedes=get out if you can

That sounds scary! Interesting name for a street.
Nareed
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August 29th, 2011 at 7:07:08 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

First there is Chapala Street, a major downtown street you hear of all the time there. I have no idea what it means.



I don't either. But it is the name of a lake in, I think, Jalisco state. El Lago de Chapala.

Quote:

El extraterrestre se puso un círculo de cosecha en mi milpa. = The alien put a crop circle in my corn field.



Now what you said in Spanish was "The extraterrestrial put on a harvest circle in my corn field."

Try "El extraterrestre puso un círculo en mi milpa."

I really don't know how "crop circle" translates to Spanish, but "cosecha" means harvest.

"Extraterrestre " means "extraterrestrial." But "alien" is a reasonable synonym. There's no word for "alien" in Spanish to denote an intelligent creature from another planet. In fact, when the first of the "Alien" movies came out, the title in Spanish was given as "Alien: El Octavo Pasajero," or "Alien: The Eighth Passenger." As I recall there were seven people in the crew of the doomed ship Nostromo.
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Wizard
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August 29th, 2011 at 7:59:11 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I really don't know how "crop circle" translates to Spanish, but "cosecha" means harvest.



I was eager to use cosecha, since you introduced it yesterday. I didn't want to just say círculo, because the reader wouldn't have a concept about what kind of circle. Maybe he just drew a six-inch diameter one in the dirt. When there is discussion about "crop circles" in Mexico, what term do they use?


Source: http://astrojan.hostei.com/images/cropc/36a.jpg

Quote: Nareed

"Extraterrestre " means "extraterrestrial." But "alien" is a reasonable synonym. There's no word for "alien" in Spanish to denote an intelligent creature from another planet. In fact, when the first of the "Alien" movies came out, the title in Spanish was given as "Alien: El Octavo Pasajero," or "Alien: The Eighth Passenger." As I recall there were seven people in the crew of the doomed ship Nostromo.



Is "alien" a commonly understood term now in Mexico? It is interesting to me when a new word is the same in multiple languages. I could be wrong, but I think at the time that movie came out the word "alien" pretty much just meant different/strange/not from around here. The movie itself cemented the meaning as an intelligent life form from another planet. Maybe the older folks can comment.


source: http://www.bundyology.com/hpg/zz507.jpg

When the movie Jaws came out, did they call it tiburon (shark) in Mexico, because mandíbulas (jaws) didn't sound as good?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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