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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 18th, 2011 at 7:34:03 PM permalink
Phrase of interestAño bisiesto



The title of two recent movies. The Anglo movie a light romantic comedy. The Mexican movie a dark disturbing sexually explicit film set in Mexico city. The Mexican movie has overwhelming critical praise. The Anglo movie got terrible critical reviews, but belongs to a class of movies that are almost always profitable.

Mexico has for the better part of a decade making movies that are a critically acclaimed, but would all certainly be rated NC-17 in America if they get a rating at all. Most people see them on DVD since there are few theaters that show them.

Anyway, Año bisiesto will be released on 24 June in USA for a short theater run, and probably a rapid turnaround to DVD.

Movie trailer with naked people

Nareed, do the following sentences say basically the same thing
1) Ana planeaba declararse a su novio.
2) Ana tenía la intención de proponerle matrimonio a su novio
3) Anna previsto proponer a su novio
Nareed
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June 19th, 2011 at 9:40:23 AM permalink
Fecha: 19 de Junio, 2011
Frase del día: el internet está jodido


The Wizard asked me to take over for a while.

The phrase for today means "The internet is screwed," which simply means I've no itnernet access. It may get restored tomorrow, then again it may not. For now I dropped by the office to post this. Lucky for all of you it's not football season yet ;)
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Nareed
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June 21st, 2011 at 3:34:54 PM permalink
Fecha: 21 de Junio, 2011
Palabra del día: Comida


As it should be evident, I got my internet connection back.

Anyway, the word for today means "food." But it's also the common term used for the mid-day meal, at least in Mexico. In contrast to what Americans, Canadians and I suspect others are used to, this is the big meal of the day, consisting of several courses and lasting a long time.

Examples:

¿Que hay de comer? = What's for lunch?

¿Que hay de comer? Comida = What's for lunch? Food. (this is a stupid joke repeated way too often)

Tengo comida en casa de mis papás este Sábado = I'm having lunch at my parents' house this Saturday.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 22nd, 2011 at 12:39:41 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Fecha: 21 de Junio, 2011 Palabra del día: Comida



In Oaxaca they had a meal called comida corrida which I believe is a term common to all parts of Mexico. Literally it means a "meal that ran" but is more like a an "early bird special" in America. However, and "early bird" meal in America typically runs from 4PM to 6PM (give or take), a "comida corrda" typically was served starting at 1PM to 2PM until about 5PM.

The meal usually consisted of a broth soup, a pasta of some sort, a small serving of meat (often a drumstick), a desert and drink like horchata or some lemonade. Quality and price varied a lot. One of the nicer restaurants in Oaxaca City served a comida corrida for about US$6 that was excellent. There was a burger king in town which charged roughly the same price for a meal, which made me wonder why anyone would possibly eat fast food.

I imagine it is not as pronounced in Mexico City, but the people in a small Mexican city have a near violent reaction to the idea of fast food restaurants. McDonald's tried to build a restaurant in the Zocolo and was met by a massive protest. The Burger King has had less resistance in Mexico and opened up quietly with no advance announcements, and under a tarp so that there would be no protests. Since it wasn't directly on the zocolo, it didn't cause as much of a stir. Burger King actually has 6 locations throughout the state now.

Burger King in Oaxaca City



McDonalds went into France in 1979 and now has 1161 locations. They entered Mexico in 1985 and now have 387 locations. Mexico is approaching double the population of France. While the French publicly do not like McDonald's it is affordable meal in a country where it is difficult to eat inexpensively.
Nareed
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June 22nd, 2011 at 1:06:13 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

In Oaxaca they had a meal called comida corrida which I believe is a term common to all parts of Mexico. Literally it means a "meal that ran" but is more like a an "early bird special" in America. However, and "early bird" meal in America typically runs from 4PM to 6PM (give or take), a "comida corrda" typically was served starting at 1PM to 2PM until about 5PM.



The term doesn't exist in English, though a French equivalent is sometimes used: prix fixe.

1 PM and 2 PM are popular times for having the mid-day meal. 3 pm is considered late, and 4 pm very late.

Quote:

The meal usually consisted of a broth soup, a pasta of some sort, a small serving of meat (often a drumstick), a desert and drink like horchata or some lemonade.



Some places are like that. Most offer a choice between two kinds of soup, pasta or rice, two entrees, dessert and water. Also most places offer beer and soda, but that's extra.

About the water, it's a common practice in Mexico to make fruit-flavored water. I've never developed a taste for it, thank god. The ingredients are water, fresh fruit and enough sugar to feed every ant in the world for a year, it seems. Oh, "fruit" is a generic term. horchata is made with water, rice (yes, rice),a little milk and lots of sugar. "Agua de Jamaica" is made from dried flower blossoms (I'm serious).

Fancier places, like VIPS, with a full menu, will have a daily special along the same lines, from items not found in the menu. Of course such places are more expensive.

Quote:

Quality and price varied a lot. One of the nicer restaurants in Oaxaca City served a comida corrida for about US$6 that was excellent.



That's expensive for that kind of meal. The places near the office are about $3.30

Quote:

There was a burger king in town which charged roughly the same price for a meal, which made me wonder why anyone would possibly eat fast food.



The cheap prix fixe places also tend to be very unhealthy. Lots of fried foods, for one thing. The selection is also very limited. I'd rather have a grilled chicken sandwich without mayo at BK than a slice of veal dipped in egg and bread batter and soaked in boiling oil <yuck!>

Quote:

I imagine it is not as pronounced in Mexico City, but the people in a small Mexican city have a near violent reaction to the idea of fast food restaurants.



Nah. they have an irrational aversion to all things American.
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teddys
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June 22nd, 2011 at 1:59:28 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

In Oaxaca they had a meal called comida corrida which I believe is a term common to all parts of Mexico. Literally it means a "meal that ran" but is more like a an "early bird special" in America. However, and "early bird" meal in America typically runs from 4PM to 6PM (give or take), a "comida corrda" typically was served starting at 1PM to 2PM until about 5PM.

The meal usually consisted of a broth soup, a pasta of some sort, a small serving of meat (often a drumstick), a desert and drink like horchata or some lemonade. Quality and price varied a lot. One of the nicer restaurants in Oaxaca City served a comida corrida for about US$6 that was excellent. There was a burger king in town which charged roughly the same price for a meal, which made me wonder why anyone would possibly eat fast food.

They had these in Peru. Price was usually $2.18 U.S. They usually included, like you said, three courses (app, entree, soup, drink), and were uniformly excellent. They were creative with the menus and I don't think we ever had the same dish. Even the drinks were different (iced teas, coffees, milk drinks, etc.). My friend and I would eat at least two every afternoon. They usually ended at 3 or 4 though.
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
pacomartin
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June 22nd, 2011 at 2:43:21 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That's expensive for that kind of meal. The places near the office are about $3.30



That was the most expensive price that I paid for a comida corrida, but it was very cheap for Los Danzantes. They have a nice location in Mexico City as well.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 22nd, 2011 at 2:43:21 PM permalink
The places weren't open very late in Oaxaca. Usually after 9 PM there was excellent street food, but not much else.

Tlayudas look like this photo in a restaurant.


"Tlayudas falda" look like this photo on the street.
Nareed
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June 23rd, 2011 at 12:42:01 PM permalink
Fecha: 23 de Junio, 2011
Palabras del día: Papá, Mamá, Papás


I forgot about the word of the day yesterday, sorry. To make up for it, I'm presenting a trio of related words today.

1) Papá = Dad, the short form of father. if you miss the accent on the last syllable, though, and write it "papa" you're saying either "Pope" or "Potato;" here to distinguish the former from the tuber, the former is capitalized when written.

2) Mamá = Mom, the short form of mother. Again, miss the accent and you're saying "Tit," or, used as a verb, "suckles." I'll get one over Paco and say this latter usage of the word is where the term "mammal" comes from.

3) Papás = Parents. well, it can also be the plural of "dad," but it's most often used in place of a term saying "the two people I'm directly descended from." There is no real equivalent Spanish word for "parents," nor, while we're on the subject, any equivalent to "child."

I judge examples are not necessary.
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Wizard
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June 24th, 2011 at 11:15:36 AM permalink
I'm back! Let's skip the SWOD for today because I've got a ton of things to catch up on.

Paco, thanks for the movie recommendation. I just reserved it on Netflix. Recently I watch Amores Perros and Amar Te Duelle. Just a coincidence, I think, that amar, and its variants, comes up in both. Then again, most movies from Mexico I tend to see are a love story.

Quote: Nareed

Mamá = Mom, the short form of mother. Again, miss the accent and you're saying "Tit," or, used as a verb, "suckles."



I'll add that to my collection. I already knew of pechos, tetas, and lolas. Meanwhile, I still find it strange that finger and toe have to share the same word. My daughter says that is also true in French.
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