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EvenBob
EvenBob
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September 6th, 2011 at 2:33:56 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Going through the map of Santa Barbara I come across some streets that appear to have Spanish names, but I can't find a translation for them. First there is Chapala Street, Next there is Salsipuedes Street.
Then we come to Quarantina Street. Let's skip over Nopal. when we get to Milpas Street.



WOW! You got me going right down memory lane. I
lived in SB for 7 years, I dealt with the Spanish streets
every day. Anacapa, Anapamu, Valerio, Carrillo, Ortega,
Castillo, Sola, I saw these streets every day. I loved living
there.
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Wizard
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September 6th, 2011 at 5:20:19 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Anacapa, Anapamu, Valerio, Carrillo, Ortega, Castillo, Sola, I saw these streets every day.



Me too. I liked the street names too. Much better than the greeting-card street names of the master-planned communities here in Vegas.
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EvenBob
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September 6th, 2011 at 5:39:03 PM permalink
I lived in a house on E Islay street. I saw on Google Maps last
week they revamped it into a condo somehow. 1100sq ft for
750K. SB is one of the few cities that didn't get hit at all in the
housing downturn, prices there are as stable as ever.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Nareed
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September 6th, 2011 at 5:41:20 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Me too. I liked the street names too. Much better than the greeting-card street names of the master-planned communities here in Vegas.



I love the street names in Las Vegas, I mean those named after hotels and local personalities. And where else will you see a "Casino Center Dr."? BTW when a hotel changes names or is just imploded and not replaced, do they change the street name?

The big difference I see between Vegas and other towns with casinos is that Vegas embraces gaming, while others just put casinos within city limits.

So, no words of the day tosay, eh?

Let's try one.

September 2nd, 2011
Palabra del día: Liga.

This is curious one as it requires two words in English, when it's usually the other way around: Rubber Band. It also means web link, though that definition is more recent. And it also means "League" as in la Liga Nacional de Futbol (guess!) or La Liga de las Naciones = The League of Nations

Related words include "Ligar" which means "to bind together" but as slang it means "to try to hook up with someone of the opposite sex."

There's "Ligadura," which means to tie something off. This is related to the English word "Ligature," very popular in cop shows and CSI when every other corpse found shows "ligature marks" wither on the wrists or ankles, or both.

Example:

La Liga de las Naciones no pudo pasar a tiempo uan condena a las acciones de Italia, en parte debido a falta de ligas para sujetar el documento = The League of Nations could not pass a condemnation of Italy's actions, in part due to a lack of rubber bands to bind the document together.

Stupid example, btu I manage to use the word twice with different meanings in the same sentence.

I chose that word because I happened to be playing with a rubber band at my desk while reading this thread :)
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pacomartin
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September 6th, 2011 at 8:26:23 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

This is curious one as it requires two words in English, when it's usually the other way around: Rubber Band. It also means web link, though that definition is more recent. And it also means "League" as in la Liga Nacional de Futbol (guess!) or La Liga de las Naciones = The League of Nations. Related words include "Ligar" which means "to bind together" but as slang it means "to try to hook up with someone of the opposite sex." There's "Ligadura," which means to tie something off. This is related to the English word "Ligature," very popular in cop shows and CSI when every other corpse found shows "ligature marks" wither on the wrists or ankles, or both.



As you mentioned English also has league with the same meaning of "alliance" derived from Latin ligare "to bind" (with related words ligature and ligament).

In English league (En) is also a vague somewhat poetic measure of roughly an hour's hike or about three miles. It is from the Latin word leuga (Lt) which my dictionary tells me in Spanish is translated legua (Sp). You only hear the word in stories about Rome or in the classic Jules Verne book. I don't know if the Spanish word is used at all since it is something I would be unlikely to hear.

In linguistics, a homonym is, in the strict sense, one of a group of words that share the same spelling and the same pronunciation but have different meanings. Thus homonyms are simultaneously homographs (words that share the same spelling, irrespective of their pronunciation) and homophones (words that share the same pronunciation, irrespective of their spelling). In casual terms most people use the word homonym when the more technical word homograph would be appropriate.

The two very different meanings of "league" qualifies them to be homonyms. They meanings are unrelated and their etymology is completely different.

Spanish has very few homographs, and almost no homonyms. But they do have homophones.

List of Spanish homophones



If we assume that a league=3 nautical miles then the circumference of the earth is 360* 60 /3 = 7,200 leagues.
If we assume that a league=3 statute miles then the circumference of the earth is 7,200*6076/5280 = 8,285 leagues.
If we assume that a league is 2.256624424 english statue miles (Spanish customary units for legue), then the circumference of the earth is 9.572 legues.
Nareed
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September 6th, 2011 at 8:54:06 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

You only hear the word in stories about Rome or in the classic Jules Verne book. I don't know if the Spanish word is used at all since it is something I would be unlikely to hear.



I'm not a big fan of XIX Century SF, but the Disney movie was titled in Spanish "20,000 Leguas de Viaje Submarino." It should be "20,000 Leguas Bajo el Mar," but who knows hwo they handle movie translations. The literal re-translation to English of the Spanish title is "20,000 Leagues of Undersea Travel."

The tale of Jack and the Beanstalk is not unkown but it's not popular. Still there is a footwear company that calls itself Botas 7 Leguas.
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Wizard
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September 6th, 2011 at 9:05:38 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I love the street names in Las Vegas, I mean those named after hotels and local personalities. And where else will you see a "Casino Center Dr."? BTW when a hotel changes names or is just imploded and not replaced, do they change the street name?

The big difference I see between Vegas and other towns with casinos is that Vegas embraces gaming, while others just put casinos within city limits.



The old Vegas street names are fine. I would say any street named after 1990 I would object to. Por ejemplo, anything west of Buffalo.

No, street names outlive the casino. This is the case with Desert Inn and just recently the Sahara. Flamingo and Tropicana, of course, still have their respective casinos.

Quote:

So, no words of the day tosay, eh?



Advinar was supposed to be the word for Sep. 6, although I posted it late on Sept 5. I'm not sure why you dated it 9/2. I know I missed a day somewhere.

Quote:

Palabra del día: Liga.

This is curious one as it requires two words in English, when it's usually the other way around: Rubber Band.



Good one. I think people used to call rubber bands "elastics." I think in either England or Australia they still do -- but what do they know?
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Nareed
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September 6th, 2011 at 9:28:50 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

No, street names outlive the casino. This is the case with Desert Inn and just recently the Sahara. Flamingo and Tropicana, of course, still have their respective casinos.



Well, "Hole in the ground Rd." isn't exactly a god name for a street :P

Quote:

Good one. I think people used to call rubber bands "elastics." I think in either England or Australia they still do -- but what do they know?



I thought "elastic" used as a noun referred to the wasitband in underwear.

In Asutralia they call pharmacies chemists. In England they call surgeons "Mister" rather than "Doctor" for some reason harking back to the early days of surgery. So, yes, what do they know? :)
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Wizard
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September 6th, 2011 at 9:59:39 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I thought "elastic" used as a noun referred to the wasitband in underwear.



They do. Perhaps that is why they had to come up with a separate expression for rubber bands.

Quote:

In Asutralia they call pharmacies chemists. In England they call surgeons "Mister" rather than "Doctor" for some reason harking back to the early days of surgery. So, yes, what do they know? :)



I know. You can see on in the video for "You Shook me All Night Long."
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pacomartin
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September 7th, 2011 at 7:51:39 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I know. You can see on in the video for "You Shook me All Night Long."


I'm sorry, but I don't see what you are talking about in the video.

The words "rub" and "rubber" existed in English for centuries before "India rubber" was imported. Since it's first use was for erasers it acquired the name. Rubber bands are actually made out of rubber, while many materials have elastic properties, but most of them are synthetic (like elastic in underwear). In this case the name is actually correct.

Speaking of binders, "Staples" is another weird word. Originally meant to mean the posts with metal prongs that held up vendor stalls, it eventually meant "staple foods" and the other basic necessities of life (presumably because they were sold in those stalls). Somehow a century ago it gravitated to "thin wire to hold sheets of paper together". The logical connection between these three definitions is very tenuous and indicative of the peculiarities of the English language.

Slightly off subject
Thomas Young, who is the namesake for Young's modulus, a measure of elasticity is a fascinating 18th century genius. Young made notable scientific contributions to the fields of vision, light, solid mechanics, energy, physiology, language, musical harmony and Egyptology. Their are some excellent biographies about his life.

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