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Wizard
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Wizard
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September 7th, 2011 at 8:44:07 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I'm sorry, but I don't see what you are talking about in the video.



video. Go to the 1:22 point.

About staples, that is interesting, I did not know that.

To go off topic again, last night I went to a function at my daughter's high school. Her French teacher said that 60% of English was mispronounced French. She gave some examples of words there were spelled the same, or almost the same, in French and English, but were pronounced very differently.

Any comment? I thought when the Romans invaded Britain and France, Latin became mixed with the previously spoken language (whose terms I don't know). Couldn't we say that modern French and English came along at about the same time and fairly independently? I do know that some German words got absorbed into English, like haus became house, but did the same thing happen with French?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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September 7th, 2011 at 8:56:54 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

To go off topic again, last night I went to a function at my daughter's high school. Her French teacher said that 60% of English was mispronounced French. She gave some examples of words there were spelled the same, or almost the same, in French and English, but were pronounced very differently.



French is mostly mispronounced Latin. So there :P

Quote:

Any comment? I thought when the Romans invaded Britain and France, Latin became mixed with the previously spoken language (whose terms I don't know). Couldn't we say that modern French and English came along at about the same time and fairly independently? I do know that some German words got absorbed into English, like haus became house, but did the same thing happen with French?



English is a Germanic language with heavy Latin influences. Rome was so widespread by both conquest and trade that Latin gained influence in languages spoken outside the Empire. So English got a double dose of Latin influence, from its Germanic side and from the direct influence of Roman conquerors.

Anwyay, all languages have taken terms, expressions and allusions from other langauges. Algebra comes from Arabic, for example, and coyote comes from Spanish via Nahuatl (I think the native word is something like "coyotl," but I may be way off).
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Nareed
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September 7th, 2011 at 4:52:50 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The logical connection between these three definitions is very tenuous and indicative of the peculiarities of the English language.



Ever wonder why the armored heavy weapons known as tanks are called tanks?

The story I heard is that when the British were developing them in WWI they his the appropiations and development as work on ships' water tanks, a subject of little interest to any enemy spies.

This makes sense, as the cover would also require large amounts of metal and metal workers. And the name may have stuck because tanks were something completely new.

In Germam the word is panzer, which comes from Panzerkampfwagen meaning something like "armored combat vehicle," or "armored war vehicle." Panzer evidently means "armored," or "armor."

So let's get to the word of the day

7 de Septiembre de 2011
Palabra del día: Blindaje

Blindaje means armor, just to stay on topic. You get related words like blindado = armored, blindar = to fortify or to armor (if that's permissible) something. But it also means to be protected against an economic eventuality, at least in Mexico. This last is recent. The last two presidents used it to decribe the state of the economy, saying "la economía nacional esta blindada contra bajas en el precio del petroleo" or "The national economy is protected from lower oil prices." Also here and there banks offer credit cards advertised as being "blindadas," meaning the card holder is protected against misuse of his card, ID theft and such.

Ejemplo:

La nomina la traen del banco en un carro blindado = The payroll is sent from the bank in an armored car.
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buzzpaff
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September 7th, 2011 at 7:18:12 PM permalink
First Spanish phrase I remember hearing was in John Wayne movie The Searchers. Muy pronto Muchachos, Ondole Ondole.

Any chance you know the title of the spanish song the indian girls sang at the stage station just before the Vaqueros rode off
unexpectedly in STAGE COACH. Damn John Carradine was the perfect gentleman gambler portral in that film
buzzpaff
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September 7th, 2011 at 7:19:53 PM permalink
As was the Mexican who was shocked to find out that scar knew who Wayne was ? No idea if a Mexican boss looked that way,
just imagined he did
Nareed
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September 7th, 2011 at 7:21:10 PM permalink
Quote: buzzpaff

First Spanish phrase I remember hearing was in John Wayne movie The Searchers. Muy pronto Muchachos, Ondole Ondole.



That should be "!Ándale, ándale!" Which means something like "Let's go, let's go!" or "Move it, move it!"

Quote:

Any chance you know the title of the spanish song the indian girls sang at the stage station just before the Vaqueros rode off
unexpectedly in STAGE COACH. Damn John Carradine was the perfect gentleman gambler portral in that film



Sorry. I've never seen it.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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September 7th, 2011 at 7:43:53 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That should be "!Ándale, ándale!" Which means something like "Let's go, let's go!" or "Move it, move it!"



But isn't the root word andar, which means to walk? When I want somebody to hurry up, I expect them to move faster than walking speed. Why don't they use correr as the root word? I'm not sure what the exact expression should be, correle perhaps?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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September 7th, 2011 at 7:51:43 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

But isn't the root word andar, which means to walk? When I want somebody to hurry up, I expect them to move faster than walking speed.



Why don't you pick on the easy words?

Andar is the action of moving from one place to another, among other things. Caminar means to walk. So you can see that saying "¡Ándale!" means "Move it!"

Quote:

Why don't they use correr as the root word? I'm not sure what the exact expression should be, correle perhaps?



Well, that would be right, too, and it's sometimes used that way.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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September 7th, 2011 at 8:07:30 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Andar is the action of moving from one place to another, among other things. Caminar means to walk. So you can see that saying "¡Ándale!" means "Move it!"



I know that caminar means to walk, but thought andar means that too. When I was in Panama I forgot the word for "walk" and the doorman at my hotel said it was andar. Granted, andar is one of those words like echar and llevar that seem to mean a host of different English words, and has always given me grief. I might add that the first definition for andar at spanishdict.com is to walk.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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September 7th, 2011 at 8:23:40 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Andar is the action of moving from one place to another, among other things. Caminar means to walk. So you can see that saying "¡Ándale!" means "Move it!"



Pardon the grammatical explanation. Imperative (Imperativo) is not really a tense, but it is a mood (modo). You will find it listed as a tense in some sources, since old grammar books often combined tenses and moods. In english this mood is usually indicated with a punctuation mark only, or a voice inflection if spoken. In Spanish it is another conjugation.

"Ánda" is the imperativo modo of the verb. Imperative (sometimes called "command" mood) makes a verb much stronger. The suffix "le" is the indirect object, so you would translate "le" as "it".

So you have upped the energy level of "walk" a notch, and you've added an indirect object, so the phrase becomes "Move it!".

Similarly if you look at the indicative mood conjugation of correr (to run) including the vosotros tense (since the Wizard is going to Argentina) you don't see the spelling corra anywhere.

present: corro , corres, corre, corremos, corréis, corren
imperfect: corría, corrías, corría, corríamos, corríais, corrían
preterite: corrí, corriste, corrió, corrimos corristeis, corrieron
future: correré, correrás, correrá, correremos, correréis, correrán
conditional: correría, correrías, correría, correríamos, correríais, correrían


Corra is the imperative mood, so No Corra is the imperative mood in the negative.

Hence, you get the sign, "Walk, Don't Run!"

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