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EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
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February 17th, 2018 at 4:41:46 PM permalink
Every day I am blown away by the power
of computers and what I can do on the
internet. I was thinking, what in my life
so far has impressed me the most, what
had the biggest impact on me.

My wife's grandmother was born in 1901
and when she was 10, the first car came
to her small town in rural upper MI. She
talked about it all her life as the one thing
that impressed her most. They had a parade
for that one car, it belonged to the local
doctor. Not planes, not electricity, it was
that car that did it for her.

For me, without a doubt, it was getting
my first color TV in 1970. I had watched
B/W for 16 years and that TV blew my
mind. I was enthralled with it for at least
2 years. I watched like a kid at the circus,
nothing has ever come close to that
experience. I was in heaven every day for
at least 2 years. It's hard to understand
unless all you had was B/W since you were
5 years old.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
FleaStiff
FleaStiff
Joined: Oct 19, 2009
  • Threads: 259
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February 17th, 2018 at 7:15:08 PM permalink
Quote: TigerWu

And I don't give a tinker's cuss ...

The expression is tinker's dam. It is a THREE letter word and it has absolutely no relation to a FOUR letter word of any sort. Early English environmental law forbade a tinker (worker in tin) from selling, giving, lending or abandoning his dam. It therefore had no price and could not even be given away much less sold. It is sort of like my opinion of something... utterly worthless. Can't even be sold for a penny.
ChesterDog
ChesterDog
Joined: Jul 26, 2010
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February 17th, 2018 at 8:03:16 PM permalink
Quote: FleaStiff

The expression is tinker's dam. It is a THREE letter word and it has absolutely no relation to a FOUR letter word of any sort. Early English environmental law forbade a tinker (worker in tin) from selling, giving, lending or abandoning his dam. It therefore had no price and could not even be given away much less sold. It is sort of like my opinion of something... utterly worthless. Can't even be sold for a penny.



The first time I heard of tinker's dam was when our parish priest got accused of swearing when he said something was not worth a tinker's dam.

TigerWu's use of "tinker's cuss" is the first I've heard. Here's the Wikipedia article about tinkers, tinker's dam, and tinker's cuss.
AZDuffman
AZDuffman
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
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February 17th, 2018 at 8:42:44 PM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

Every day I am blown away by the power
of computers and what I can do on the
internet.



The interesting thing to me is how long it took to get computers near-right, and how far we have come since. The PC was born for all intents and purposes in 1981. It took 10+ years to become affordable to most people, and really it was 1995 before it did much at home other than word processing, some spreadsheets, and games. Before 1995, it was really possible or worthwhile to have more than one program running at one time. I remember hearing about this feature and my reaction was, "why would you want to?"

1995-2005 was a transition time. The internet came about, and we got to see an industry and technology come about. Rules were made and broken. Things came and went. Who remembers ICQ? But what really happened was standards started getting set. "Know Microsoft Office" was once worth putting on a resume, remember that? For a few years recruiters would send a little test to prove you did. Maybe they still do, or maybe I have not had one because my resume is such that they figure it is impossible I do not.

2018. My job cannot function without them. I walk into a room and take pictures of what I need. I send them from my phone and they are waiting at my computer when I get back to the next room. What is most amazing is I think nothing at all of it. As late as the 1970s it is doubtful even the POTUS had such a capability available to him. I got it all for less than $1,000.
Tolerance is the virtue of believing in nothing
gamerfreak
gamerfreak
Joined: Dec 28, 2014
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February 17th, 2018 at 9:03:17 PM permalink
Quote: AZDuffman

The interesting thing to me is how long it took to get computers near-right, and how far we have come since. The PC was born for all intents and purposes in 1981. It took 10+ years to become affordable to most people, and really it was 1995 before it did much at home other than word processing, some spreadsheets, and games. Before 1995, it was really possible or worthwhile to have more than one program running at one time. I remember hearing about this feature and my reaction was, "why would you want to?"

1995-2005 was a transition time. The internet came about, and we got to see an industry and technology come about. Rules were made and broken. Things came and went. Who remembers ICQ? But what really happened was standards started getting set. "Know Microsoft Office" was once worth putting on a resume, remember that? For a few years recruiters would send a little test to prove you did. Maybe they still do, or maybe I have not had one because my resume is such that they figure it is impossible I do not.

2018. My job cannot function without them. I walk into a room and take pictures of what I need. I send them from my phone and they are waiting at my computer when I get back to the next room. What is most amazing is I think nothing at all of it. As late as the 1970s it is doubtful even the POTUS had such a capability available to him. I got it all for less than $1,000.


It took humans roughly the same amount of time to progress from copper to steel weapons as it took them to progress from steel to nuclear weapons.
EvenBob
EvenBob
Joined: Jul 18, 2010
  • Threads: 413
  • Posts: 21661
February 18th, 2018 at 5:40:37 PM permalink
Quote: AZDuffman

2018. My job cannot function without them. I walk into a room and take pictures of what I need. I send them from my phone and they are waiting at my computer when I get back to the next room. What is most amazing is I think nothing at all of it. As late as the 1970s it is doubtful even the POTUS had such a capability available to him. I got it all for less than $1,000.



I paid thru the nose for my first
digital camera in 1997 for Ebay.
I was a huge camera guy, had a
bunch of SLR's with accessories
like winders and tripods. Never
used them again after I got the
digital.

I bought my last digital in 2004
and it still works great. 6 megs,
a huge number then. I see 16 meg
models at Walmart for $100, I paid
$400 for mine 14 years ago. I can't
imagine why you would need 16 megs.
"It's not enough to succeed, your friends must fail." Gore Vidal
Greasyjohn
Greasyjohn
Joined: Dec 8, 2013
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February 18th, 2018 at 8:26:08 PM permalink
In 1987, for my work, I bought an IBM 36 computer. It consisted of a tower, 2 monitors and 2 keyboards. No internet, DOS. $17,000.
rxwine
rxwine
Joined: Feb 28, 2010
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February 18th, 2018 at 8:49:32 PM permalink
There was an 80s documentary on last night. They had a brief segment on "Hyperage Magazine" It's not only still there, they seem to have the original page, and people still post there.

http://www.macgui.com/usenet/?group=22&id=522
prisoner of gravity
AZDuffman
AZDuffman
Joined: Nov 2, 2009
  • Threads: 216
  • Posts: 9449
February 19th, 2018 at 7:31:48 AM permalink
Quote: EvenBob

I paid thru the nose for my first
digital camera in 1997 for Ebay.
I was a huge camera guy, had a
bunch of SLR's with accessories
like winders and tripods. Never
used them again after I got the
digital.

I bought my last digital in 2004
and it still works great. 6 megs,
a huge number then. I see 16 meg
models at Walmart for $100, I paid
$400 for mine 14 years ago. I can't
imagine why you would need 16 megs.



I bought my digital used off a roommate in 2007 and had to get it fixed. Think I still saved $50-100. I still have it but just use it for pics for eBay and rare pics of things I put online for whatever reason. Some to save, like my house remodel. It will probably do what I need it to do for my lifetime.

I still put 2005 as a sort of cutoff time. Before that you had to keep upgrading to keep up. Software leapfrogged hardware. Since then, well every new version of Windows is less and less a revolution than now a yearly model change, like seeing the new Fords and Chevys in fall used to be. My printer/scanner does all I need and some things I never bothered to figure out.

I remember reading in the late 1990s about how flash memory would change everything. I grasped the concept, but did not see what they would use it for. Now I mention those times and people ask what on earth flash memory is. They are using it all the time, but do not know how big it was to not lose your memory when the power went out or to not have to let a disk or tape spool.
Tolerance is the virtue of believing in nothing
Joeman
Joeman
Joined: Feb 21, 2014
  • Threads: 31
  • Posts: 1297
February 19th, 2018 at 7:37:58 AM permalink
What is this "flash memory" you speak of? Our first digital camera at work (ca. 1999) wrote the files to an internal 3.5" floppy!
"Dealer has 'rock'... Pay 'paper!'"

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