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5 votes (38.46%)
1 vote (7.69%)
1 vote (7.69%)
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1 vote (7.69%)
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7 votes (53.84%)
3 votes (23.07%)
3 votes (23.07%)
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13 members have voted

DogHand
DogHand
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March 28th, 2019 at 6:05:29 PM permalink
I got 34 on your test, BBB.

The number of neutrons in the nucleus is not necessarily equal to the number of protons (and, thus, the atomic number). The varying number of neutrons accounts for the isotopes: thus, carbon, with an atomic number of 6, has 6 protons, but it exists in three isotopes: Carbon-12 (with 6 neutrons), Carbon-13 (with 7 neutrons), and Carbon-14 (with 8 neutrons).

Thanks for posting your video!

Dog Hand
beachbumbabs
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beachbumbabs
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March 28th, 2019 at 6:39:11 PM permalink
Quote: DogHand

I got 34 on your test, BBB.

The number of neutrons in the nucleus is not necessarily equal to the number of protons (and, thus, the atomic number). The varying number of neutrons accounts for the isotopes: thus, carbon, with an atomic number of 6, has 6 protons, but it exists in three isotopes: Carbon-12 (with 6 neutrons), Carbon-13 (with 7 neutrons), and Carbon-14 (with 8 neutrons).

Thanks for posting your video!

Dog Hand



Thanks for the lesson, Dog Hand! I googled to get an answer that matched what they must have been looking for on that one. Is there one definitive or simple answer, and that answer is protons, then?

I knew this once, in 11th grade chemistry, but I've dumped the knowledge.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
Wizard
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Wizard
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March 28th, 2019 at 6:50:54 PM permalink
Quote: DogHand

The number of neutrons in the nucleus is not necessarily equal to the number of protons (and, thus, the atomic number). The varying number of neutrons accounts for the isotopes: thus, carbon, with an atomic number of 6, has 6 protons, but it exists in three isotopes: Carbon-12 (with 6 neutrons), Carbon-13 (with 7 neutrons), and Carbon-14 (with 8 neutrons).



As I recall, Barbara correctly answered protons for that one, as I would have too.

At the risk of changing the subject, I've never really understood the purpose of neutrons.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
DogHand
DogHand
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Thanks for this post from:
tringlomanebeachbumbabs
March 28th, 2019 at 8:29:34 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

As I recall, Barbara correctly answered protons for that one, as I would have too.

At the risk of changing the subject, I've never really understood the purpose of neutrons.



Actually, BBB said neutrons.

The purpose of neutrons is to stabilize the atom's nucleus: if all the nucleus had was protons, their mutual repulsion would shatter the nucleus... though that wouldn't "matter" to us ;-)

Dog Hand
beachbumbabs
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March 29th, 2019 at 8:24:18 AM permalink
Quote: DogHand

Actually, BBB said neutrons.

The purpose of neutrons is to stabilize the atom's nucleus: if all the nucleus had was protons, their mutual repulsion would shatter the nucleus... though that wouldn't "matter" to us ;-)

Dog Hand



So, here's what happened on that answer. At 7pm, they showed Jeopardy. They ASKED that question in some form, where the correct answer was neutrons. And then , oh so clever, there it was on their try-out test. So, I was caught in an ah-hah moment, trying to sort out whether they were being smart-asses in running the same question by us, instead of thinking about the actual question. I know the proton and electron count has to balance for the element to be stable, that the electrons circle the nucleus while the protons and neutrons are inside it, but had genuinely not focused on what they count to determine the atomic number. So, gotcha! Out of time - next question. Oh, well.
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.
gordonm888
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March 31st, 2019 at 5:20:27 PM permalink
Definitely protons. Also, Nabokov was Lolita author. Those were the two answers that Babs missed that I would have gotten right, but she got 4 answers that I would have missed.

41 is a good performance, I think. It will be interesting to see if you move forward.
Sometimes, people are just a bottomless mystery. And, after all, this is just a sh*tty little forum in the sun-less backwaters of the online world.
Wizard
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Wizard
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March 31st, 2019 at 7:36:42 PM permalink
Quote: DogHand

The purpose of neutrons is to stabilize the atom's nucleus: if all the nucleus had was protons, their mutual repulsion would shatter the nucleus... though that wouldn't "matter" to us ;-)



Not to say you're wrong, but I thought the nucleus was held in place via the strong force.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
gordonm888
gordonm888
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March 31st, 2019 at 9:52:27 PM permalink
A nucleus of two (or more) protons would be unstable and fly apart due to electromagnetic forces.

(Simplified) The strong force is a very short-range force. Before you could get the two protons close enough to feel the strong force, they would be repelled by the electromagnetic force. However, the strong force can hold together a proton and a neutron.
Sometimes, people are just a bottomless mystery. And, after all, this is just a sh*tty little forum in the sun-less backwaters of the online world.
gordonm888
gordonm888
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April 2nd, 2019 at 9:20:49 PM permalink
Quote: gordonm888

A nucleus of two (or more) protons would be unstable and fly apart due to electromagnetic forces.

(Simplified) The strong force is a very short-range force. Before you could get the two protons close enough to feel the strong force, they would be repelled by the electromagnetic force. However, the strong force can hold together a proton and a neutron.



I plead guilty to killing this thread.
Sometimes, people are just a bottomless mystery. And, after all, this is just a sh*tty little forum in the sun-less backwaters of the online world.
beachbumbabs
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beachbumbabs
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April 2nd, 2019 at 11:23:41 PM permalink
Quote: gordonm888

I plead guilty to killing this thread.



Lol...it'll wake back up in a few days. Test next week!
If the House lost every hand, they wouldn't deal the game.

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