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Nareed
Nareed
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October 21st, 2011 at 10:00:49 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I caught this video from the Food Network about eating "Tacos de Cabeza" from a stand in Oaxaca Mexico. For those of you who were squeamish about eating animal organs, they give you an idea of how many parts of the head you can make into a taco.



Food can be pretty gross. And people ask me why I only order maciza when we get carnitas. The other decent choice is rib, and that often comes with bone. The rest includes things like skin, mouth, tongue, brains and I hesitate to speculate on some others. Oh, and that's pig parts, BTW.

But then people eat all sorts of disgusting items, like shrimp, even.
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Wizard
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October 21st, 2011 at 10:08:37 AM permalink
Fecha: 21 de Octubre, 2011
Estado: Coahuila
Palabra: Saltillo



Detroit Lions?

Coahuila is another border state, whose main industries are coal mining and auto manufacturing. The capital is Saltillo, which is where we get our word of the day, which means a small jump. It comes from the verb saltar, meaning to jump.

Ejemplo time.

Hice un saltillo, por qué me sorprendió. = I made a small jump, because you surprised me.
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Nareed
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October 21st, 2011 at 11:02:58 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Detroit Lions?



See? :P

Quote:

The capital is Saltillo, which is where we get our word of the day, which means a small jump. It comes from the verb saltar, meaning to jump.



I'm not so sure that's the case. The suffix "illo" does mean small, but not necessarily. In Mexico de suffix for smallenss is "ito." I'm not sure it applies tot he word "salto." I'm less sure that's the reason for the name of the capital of Coahuila

Quote:

Hice un saltillo, por qué me sorprendió. = I made a small jump, because you surprised me.



That's right, but it uses a formal pronoun implicitly. The more informal way would be "..porque me sorprendiste."

Also, usage in mexico would go more along the lines of "Dí un saltito..." or ""Pegué un saltito...." rather than "hice un saltillo...."

And for trivia, up in the north they tend to swallow or skip the "ll" and "y" sounds when they go in the middle of a word. So the natives pronounce the name of their city more like "Saltio."
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pacomartin
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October 21st, 2011 at 11:46:21 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Quote:

The capital is Saltillo, which is where we get our word of the day, which means a small jump. It comes from the verb saltar, meaning to jump.



I'm not so sure that's the case. The suffix "illo" does mean small, but not necessarily. In Mexico de suffix for smallenss is "ito." I'm not sure it applies tot he word "salto." I'm less sure that's the reason for the name of the capital of Coahuila



I would use saltito as Nareed suggested to mean "small jump". While saltillo also literally means "small jump" it is now a highly specialized word. It is used by early Spanish linguists to describe a particular sound in the Aztec language (what we call a glottal stop in English).

As a place name for the Mexican city it probably literally means "Small Salta" where Salta is a well-known city in Argentina. But the Argentine city name is of uncertain origin, and is probably an interpretation of an Indigenous place name and may not be related to the verb saltar.

In American English we have several similar examples. The Algonquian word quinetucket, was translated (corrupted) into French as Connecticut and then taken literally into English.

In general, I agree with Nareed, that place names often have unusual origins and may not always lead to common words in the spoken language. For example, a Spanish fantasy writer wrote about a fabled paradise, peopled by black Amazonian women (and no men) who were ruled by Queen Califia. Her country was known as California. The story was used in naming the Western shore of Spanish North America. Pennsylvania means "Penn's Woods" using the colorful, but relatively rare English word "sylvan" from the Latin word silva for "wood, forest, grove". While the etymology is correct, if you tell it to a new speaker of English, he is likely to try and use "sylvan" in a sentence, and many people won't understand him.

BTW: "Saltar" has a colloquial use as in "Saltarse un semáforo" or to "I took a jump through the stop light", whereas in English we say the less colorful "I went through a stoplight".
pacomartin
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October 21st, 2011 at 1:03:15 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

And for trivia, up in the north they tend to swallow or skip the "ll" and "y" sounds when they go in the middle of a word. So the natives pronounce the name of their city more like "Saltio."



The letter ll, in Spain, is pronounced high on the palate, rather than behind the teeth. It sounds like the double l in the English word million.

Speakers from most other countries pronounce ll closer to the English y sound.

Argentina and Uruguay: One of the most distinctive features of these two southern cone countries is the pronunciation of the letters ll and y, which Argentines and Uruguayans pronounce rather like sh or zh.
Nareed
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October 21st, 2011 at 1:12:46 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I would use saltito as Nareed suggested to mean "small jump".



And again I answered too quickly.

In common modern usage, people would be more likely to say "Pegué un brinco..." the diminutive of "brinco" is "brinquito."

Quote:

For example, a Spanish fantasy writer wrote about a fabled paradise, peopled by black Amazonian women (and no men) who were ruled by Queen Califia. Her country was known as California. The story was used in naming the Western shore of Spanish North America.



I had a geography teacher who taught us the name derived from the Spaniards' mispronunciation of a Latin term meaning "warm place," or something like that. It sounded plausible because "calido" means "warm" in Spanish, so it should be the same in Latin.

Quote:

BTW: "Saltar" has a colloquial use as in "Saltarse un semáforo" or to "I took a jump through the stop light", whereas in English we say the less colorful "I went through a stoplight".



Used that way it means "to skip." With a stop light on red, most people are likely to say "me pasé un alto," meaning "I passed a red light" (alto is the name for the red light, it means "stop"). But say a student was promoted from the 3rd to the 5th grade, she'd say "Me salte un año," meaning "I skipped over a grade." The word "año" in this case means a school year, which is how long a grade lasts.

BTW Nareed's First Law of Language: If you were to carefully analyze each word before speaking, you'd wind up taking a vow of silence :P
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pacomartin
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October 21st, 2011 at 1:48:05 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Used that way it means "to skip." With a stop light on red, most people are likely to say "me pasé un alto," meaning "I passed a red light" (alto is the name for the red light, it means "stop"). But say a student was promoted from the 3rd to the 5th grade, she'd say "Me salte un año," meaning "I skipped over a grade."



Do you say "La niña salta cuerda"? We would say "The girl is skipping rope". I am not if "cuerda" or "la ropa" is the correct word since in English we tend to use cord for "electric cord" which is a specialized kind of rope.
Nareed
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October 21st, 2011 at 2:01:40 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Do you say "La niña salta cuerda"?



"...La cuerda" and maybe "brinca" but essentially yes.

Quote:

We would say "The girl is skipping rope".



Funny you should mention this. In a story I'm working on, there is a scene involving three girls doing just that. I haven't written that part yet, but in the outline I wrote "Three girls in white dresses with blue sashes are jumping rope while an older girl/young woman watches them and smiles." [emphasis added].

So you're saying I should use "skipping rope" when I do write it?

Quote:

I am not if "cuerda" or "la ropa" is the correct word since in English we tend to use cord for "electric cord" which is a specialized kind of rope.



This invovles, I guess, some of your fake friends. Briefly:

Cuerda = Rope
Ropa = Clothes, clothing
Cable = Cord (as in electric cord)
Cordon = Cord (as in umbilical cord)
Acorde = Chord
Cable = Cable (as in steel cable or cable TV)
Alambre = Wire
Sin Cables = Wireless

Hope this helps.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 21st, 2011 at 4:14:23 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Funny you should mention this. In a story I'm working on, there is a scene involving three girls doing just that. I haven't written that part yet, but in the outline I wrote "Three girls in white dresses with blue sashes are jumping rope while an older girl/young woman watches them and smiles." [emphasis added].

So you're saying I should use "skipping rope" when I do write it?



Actually "skipping rope" is more British English and "jumping rope" is more American English. But it's not exclusive, sometimes we go back and forth. In American English if you say "to skip" it refers to a kind of jump step (without a rope).

I assume you can picture the jump step from these photos. The fat girl is not skipping.


Nareed
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October 21st, 2011 at 4:50:02 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Actually "skipping rope" is more British English and "jumping rope" is more American English.



Then it stays. Thanks.

But I'm afraid you failed to identify the movie alluded to in my, admitedly, brief outline of a scene. Read it again and see if you can spot it.

Quote:

In American English if you say "to skip" it refers to a kind of jump step (without a rope).



I knew that, but thanks for the info.
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