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Doc
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August 13th, 2012 at 3:18:49 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The CIA project to use LSD for mind control was officially sanctioned in 1953, but ....


Is that the project that resulted in the film of the cat freaking out in fear of the small mouse? I remember seeing the B&W film clip on TV in either the 50s or early 60s and hearing many years later that the cat had been given LSD.
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August 13th, 2012 at 3:25:22 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

Is that the project that resulted in the film of the cat freaking out in fear of the small mouse? I remember seeing the B&W film clip on TV in either the 50s or early 60s and hearing many years later that the cat had been given LSD.



How did we get from arruinar to that?

Note: Rhetorical question.
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August 13th, 2012 at 3:29:46 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

How did we get from arruinar to that?



I think someone wanted to stir the thread away from wedding gowns.

Quote:

Note: Rhetorical question.



Isn't it time for a rhetorical tag?

Note: just kiddding.
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August 13th, 2012 at 3:46:07 PM permalink
Fecha: 13-8-12
Palabra: Bando


Today's SWD means a decree. In case you're wondering, the word for a band is a banda.

El Capitan hacado una bando que Sra. Howell debe hacer tareas. = The Skipper made a decree that Mrs. Howell must do some chores.
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August 13th, 2012 at 3:58:01 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means a decree.



It also means a faction, or a side in a dispute.

Quote:

El Capitan hacado una handa que Sra. Howell debe hacer tareas. = The Skipper made a decree that Mrs. Howell must do some chores.



The first part of the sentence doesn't make sense. I mean, you're using things that aren't words. So: "El Capitán ha emitido un bando [decrees are issued, not made] que LA Sra. Howell...." If you were trying to use "made," then the word should have been "hecho."

BTW, aside from an innordinate use by El Principito when he ruled Mex City, the word is hardly ever encountered when meaning "decree." The terms used are "edicto" and "decreto."
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pacomartin
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August 13th, 2012 at 5:15:49 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

It also means a faction, or a side in a dispute.

BTW, aside from an innordinate use by El Principito when he ruled Mex City, the word is hardly ever encountered when meaning "decree." The terms used are "edicto" and "decreto."



The DRAE lists a colloquial meaning for del otro bando which it says is used in Cuba, El Salvador, México y Uruguay. The English equivalent would be plays for the other team.

Google searches on "bando" turn up Italian uses more than Spanish.

We are going to have to make a list of primary dictionary definitions of English words that are in reality very rarely used. It seems as if Nareed keeps pointing out dictionary definitions that are actually archaic in real speech.
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August 13th, 2012 at 9:36:52 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The DRAE lists a colloquial meaning for del otro bando which it says is used in Cuba, El Salvador, México y Uruguay. The English equivalent would be plays for the other team.


OK, so I'm leading the thread off-track again due to curiosity.

In Willemstad, Curacao, two of the main areas of the city are known as Punta and Otrabanda, and they are connected by a pontoon-supported pedestrian bridge that may be pivoted about one end (by a power launch driving the other end) to open the waterway to ship traffic. In my imagination, I have decided that these two words are Dutch and that they mean something equivalent to "bridge side" and "other side" of the river. Of course I don't know that language at all and can't even recognize whether it is really the language of those words, much less translate them.

So am I completely mistaken, or are "Otrabanda" and "del otro bando" really that close in meaning between Spanish and Dutch? I don't think of those as being tightly related languages.
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August 13th, 2012 at 9:57:48 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

In Willemstad, Curacao, two of the main areas of the city are known as Punta and Otrabanda, and they are connected by a pontoon-supported pedestrian bridge...



I've walked over that bridge. I don't know any more about the meaning than you do. It is a real potpourri of languages in Curacao. You'll hear English, Dutch, Papiamento, and Spanish.

Quesion: If someone from Curacao played in the Olympics, would they play for:

A. Curacao
B. Netherland Antilles
C. Netherlands
D. None of the above
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August 14th, 2012 at 8:09:43 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I've walked over that bridge. I don't know any more about the meaning than you do. It is a real potpourri of languages in Curacao. You'll hear English, Dutch, Papiamento, and Spanish.

Quesion: If someone from Curacao played in the Olympics, would they play for:

A. Curacao
B. Netherland Antilles
C. Netherlands
D. None of the above

Don't test me on the Olympics, Wiz! The answer is "D", none of the above. Since the dissolution of the Netherlands Antilles happened after their athletes qualified, they competed as Independent Olympic Athletes. (You may have noticed them in the Parade of Nations hamming it up). However, NA athletes did also have the option to compete for Holland if they wished; sprinter Churandy Martina did this, for example. Athletes also had the option of competing for Aruba, though nobody took advantage of that.
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August 14th, 2012 at 8:22:07 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

So am I completely mistaken, or are "Otrabanda" and "del otro bando" really that close in meaning between Spanish and Dutch? I don't think of those as being tightly related languages.



Many names in this continent are gross mispronunciations of native words or names. Spaniards are notorious for doing this even today, for example the name "Chrysler" in Spain is pronounced "Kreesler." So imagine what they did with languages that, when transliterated, make use of words heavy with the letters X, Q and Z, and which use the phoneme "tl" at the end of names frequently.

I don't know the history of the Dutch involvement in the Americas very well, or the palces where they set up a presence either. But it's likely they had as much trouble with the local pronunciation as did the Spaniards. And on the other hand, the name "Curacao" sounds kind of Portuguese. So that may just add another layer of confussion.
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August 14th, 2012 at 9:58:44 AM permalink
Quote: teddys

the dissolution of the Netherlands Antilles happened after their athletes qualified, they competed as Independent Olympic Athletes. (You may have noticed them in the Parade of Nations hamming it up).



¡Que interesante!

I must have been out of the room or they went to commercial break when the "independent athletes" were introduced. Under what flag and title did they march? What other parts of the world sent such independents?

Fecha: 14-8-12
Palabra: Bramar


Today's SWD means to bellow/roar. A similar, and more common, word is gritar. I tend to think that gritar is closer to scream, and bramar means to say something loudly, likely in anger. The Skipper yelling at Gilligan readily comes to mind so...

No me hagas enojar te o te bramaré y te golpearé con mi gorra. = Don't get me angry, or I will yet at you and hit you with my cap.

p.s. Sorry about butchering the last ejemplo. Please add 20 push-ups to my tab.
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August 14th, 2012 at 11:16:19 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to bellow/roar. A similar, and more common, word is gritar. I tend to think that gritar is closer to scream, and bramar means to say something loudly, likely in anger.



It's used to denote the noise an angry bull makes, too. So when aplied to people, it's yelling in an irrational, disjointed manner.
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teddys
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August 14th, 2012 at 3:23:44 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

¡Que interesante!

I must have been out of the room or they went to commercial break when the "independent athletes" were introduced. Under what flag and title did they march? What other parts of the world sent such independents?

They were after Iceland and before India in NBC's coverage. They marched under the Olympic flag as "Independent Olympic Athletes." There were three athletes from Curacao: one sailor, one sprinter, and one judoka. There was also a men's marathoner from South Sudan (the newest country in the world) in the group, but he wasn't present at the Opening Ceremony. Their flagbearer was Brooklyn Kerlin, a member of the London organizing committee.
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August 15th, 2012 at 10:06:47 AM permalink
Quote: Doc

So am I completely mistaken, or are "Otrabanda" and "del otro bando" really that close in meaning between Spanish and Dutch? I don't think of those as being tightly related languages.



"Otrabanda" and "del otro bando" are not Dutch, but they are Papiamento. Papiamento is a creole language derived from African Languages and either Portuguese or Spanish, with some influences from Amerindian languages, English, and Dutch.

Nearly every language has some loan words from most other languages. You are correct that Dutch and Spanish are not closely related, but two loan words are:
babor= port side of a ship: from French babord "portside", from Dutch bakboord "left side of a ship"
berbiquí= carpenter's brace: from regional French veberquin (French vilebrequin), from Dutch wimmelken, from wimmel "auger, drill, carpenter's brace" +

The best known Spanish words borrowed from Old English are the directions.
este= east: from French est, from Middle English est, from Old English ēast, from Germanic (*)aust-, from the IE root (*)awes-, aus "to shine" .
norte= north: from Old French nord, from Old English north, from Germanic (*)north-, from the IE root (*)nr-to "north", from (*)nr- "wiktionary:under, to the left"
oeste= west: from Middle English west, from Old English west, from Germanic (*)west-, from (*)wes-to-, from (*)wes-, from (*)wespero- "evening, dusk"
sud-= south (combining form): from Old French sud "south", from Old English sūth, from Germanic (*)sunthaz, from the IE root (*)sun-, swen-, variants of (*)sāwel- "sun"
sur= south: from French sud, from Old English sūth, see sud- above.
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August 15th, 2012 at 10:24:07 AM permalink
Fecha: 15-8-12
Palabra: Patrón


Today's SWD means "boss." I'm sure the beginning readers are thinking to themselves, "Wait a minute, I thought the word for boss is jefe." That too. I tend to think that patrón conveys greater respect.

The question for the intermediate readers is to compare and contrast the Spanish patrón and the English "patron."

Ejemplo time.

Hay un patrón al fin del túnel. = There is a boss at the end of the tunnel.

Trivia time! What game does this example refer to? No searching!
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August 15th, 2012 at 11:56:37 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The question for the intermediate readers is to compare and contrast the Spanish patrón and the English "patron."



In English it's used to mean customer. However, in one novellette, Robert Heinlein uses it to mean boss. The setting is a colonial type of Venus (grossly uscientific by today's standards), and the plantation owners are called "patrons."

The equivalent for "patron," in the usual sense, in Spanish is "parroquiano/a."

Oh, "patrón" also means "pattern."

Quote:

Hay un patrón al fin del túnel. = There is a boss at the end of the tunnel.



"..al finAL del tunel"
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August 15th, 2012 at 12:35:41 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

In English it's used to mean customer.


Original meaning was "a lord-master, a protector," c.1300, from Old French patrun (12c.), from Middle Latin patronus "patron saint, bestower of a benefice, lord, master, model, pattern," from Latin patronus "defender, protector, advocate," from pater (gen. patris) "father."

Commercial sense of "regular customer" first recorded circa 1600.
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August 15th, 2012 at 3:13:36 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Original meaning was "a lord-master, a protector," ....


I guess that it is in this sense that one may be called a patron of the arts? That usage means more of a sponsor or benefactor than just a customer.
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August 15th, 2012 at 3:37:30 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

I guess that it is in this sense that one may be called a patron of the arts? That usage means more of a sponsor or benefactor than just a customer.



That is the second oldest meaning of the world

  1. patron c1300: lord protector
  2. patron c1300's: "one who advances the cause" (of an artist, institution, etc.), usually by the person's wealth and power
  3. patronage (n) 1400's "right of presenting a qualified person to a church benefice,"
  4. patronize (v) 1580s: "to act as a patron towards," from patron + -ize.
  5. patron 1600: Commercial sense of "regular customer"
  6. Patron saint 1717: was originally simply patron (late 14c.)
  7. patronage (n) 1769: General sense of "power to give jobs or favors"
  8. patronize 1797: "treat in a condescending way"
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August 16th, 2012 at 7:44:52 AM permalink
Fecha: 16-8-12
Palabra: Pavonearse


Today's SWD means to brag/show off/swagger.

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast pavonearse y contonearse. The latter means to swagger only, as far as I know, but what is the difference in the swaggering?

Ejemplo time.

Tengo calor viendo Ginger pavonearte en toda la isla. = I'm getting hot watching Ginger swagger all over the island.
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August 16th, 2012 at 8:08:27 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to brag/show off/swagger.



While I find out whether I'm suspended and for how long, I'll do a short lecture:

Writen and spoken versions of the same language are themselves different languages. This is all the more so in a sciety with deep, conscious divisions based on class. Those who write tend to be pompous about it and to use "Big Words" in order to show off their erudition, and to distance themselves from the masses who might as well be iliterate (they're not, of course, but that's another topic).

Therefore in editorials, letters to the editor, books and book translations, you will come across words and phrasings that you'd never meet in real life, or even in TV shows and movies. And when you do, it's meant to poke fun at the pretentious of the literate snobs. This is more or less true in every Spanish-speaking countries.

To add to the confussion, word use varies among countries, and among regions within countries. So in your translations you'll come across words that are just not in wide use. Such as the one you picked for today, wich BTW probably comes from the word "pavorreal" meaning "peacock." "Pavo" means "turkey."

To exemplify, you may recall a scene in a movie about a baseball game-fixing scandal, where a heart-broken little boy comes up to a player and implores "Say it ain't so, Joe!" Now, the literate snobs I mentioned would render that as "Refute these calumnies, Joseph!"

Quote:

Tengo calor viendo Ginger pavonearte en toda la isla. = I'm getting hot watching Ginger swagger all over the island.



"...pavonearSe," or even "pavoneÁNDOSe." And you should put an "a" before Ginger.
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pacomartin
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August 16th, 2012 at 11:30:37 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Writen and spoken versions of the same language are themselves different languages. This is all the more so in a sciety with deep, conscious divisions based on class. Those who write tend to be pompous about it and to use "Big Words" in order to show off their erudition, and to distance themselves from the masses who might as well be iliterate



It seems to me that this word is perfect to describe the type of person you are talking about. Vain, ostentatious, and someone who is pumped up (like a peacock). Or are you saying that if you use the word you will sound like someone the word is describing?

A similar word in English is probably splendiloquent which literally means "splendidly eloquent". If you use the word, people are unlikely to find you splendidly eloquent, but are more likely to think you are pompous.
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August 17th, 2012 at 8:03:13 AM permalink
Fecha: 17-8-12
Palabra: Quinceañera


Nuestro maestra leal esta prohibito, entonces voy a escriber mas en Español, sin temor de un montón de correcciónes.

Hoy es la quinceañera de mi hija mayor. Una quinceañera es una fiesta cuando una chica tiene quience años. Por supuesto, es celebrado en países Latinas, y aquí para familias Latinas. Aquí creo que el nivel de gasto subiría a esto de una boda. Por esto, tengo alegre que no la casé una mujer Latina.

Gracías por aguantan mi Español horrible. Por favor, repuestas en Español solomente cuando Nareed esta desaparecido.
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August 17th, 2012 at 8:51:01 AM permalink
Nuestro maestro de leales se ha ido, así que voy a escribir más en español, sin temor a un montón de correcciones.

Hoy es fiesta de quince años de mi hija mayor. Una quinceañera es una celebración cuando una chica tiene quince años. Por supuesto que se celebra en los países de América, y aquí en los Estados Unidos para las familias latinas. Aquí creo que el nivel de gasto se elevaría a esto en una boda. Para ello, me alegro de que no estoy casado con una mujer latina.

Gracias por aguantar mi pésimo español. Por favor, conteste sólo en español cuando Nareed se ha ido.


La Quinceañera es una vez en un evento de toda la vida, para ser valorada siempre.
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August 17th, 2012 at 10:04:59 AM permalink
Gracías por corregiendo mi Español, pero tienes diversíon y escribirás algo que quieres decir en Español.
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August 17th, 2012 at 10:06:10 AM permalink
No lo entiendo "quince" frente a "quience", tal como se utiliza tanto por el Wizard y Paco. Tampoco Google Translate.
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August 17th, 2012 at 10:57:44 AM permalink
La palabra "quience" está mal escrito. La palabra es "quince".
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August 17th, 2012 at 3:01:38 PM permalink
Mas informacíon de la costumbres de la: quinceañera.

A veces, la quinceañera es la primera vez la chica se puede bailar con chicos y llever zapatos con talcones altos.
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August 18th, 2012 at 1:05:01 PM permalink
Mi idea que charlamos en Español no era una éxito grande. Entonces, volveremos el camino habitual.

Fecha: 18-8-12
Palabra: Traguear


Today's SWD means to drink. We already have beber and tomar, what do we need another word for "drink" for? Hopefully the advanced readers can explain how traguear is different from the other two. Reverso seems to indicate that in some countries traguear means to get "sloshed." If my English is correct, "sloshed" means drunk, but alcohol had nothing to do with the word in the context I found today's SWD.

Ejemplo time.

Gilligan, quiero traguear algo. Traeme una vaso de leche de coco. = Gilligan, I want to drink something. Bring me a class of coconut milk.
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August 19th, 2012 at 8:34:00 AM permalink
Fecha: 19-8-12
Palabra: Aullar


Today's SWD means to yell/howl.

Ejemplo time.

Me gusta aullar y llevar un palo pequeño. = I like to yell and carry a small stick.
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August 20th, 2012 at 12:46:03 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

We already have beber and tomar, what do we need another word for "drink" for?



In the DRAE the verb is only listed in the pronomial (reflexive) as traguearse and it means to get yourself sloshed (really drunk).

A somewhat related verb is tragar
transitive meaning is "to swallow"
intransitive meaning is "to concede to a proposal lamely". A colloquial definition
pronomial meaning is "collide yourself with an object". A colloquial definition

The verb has a vulgar meaning in many contexts, naturally, so you would want to be careful on how you use it.
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August 20th, 2012 at 12:56:43 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to yell/howl.



The DRAE says
aullido (de aullar). Voz triste y prolongada del lobo, el perro y otros animales.

So "sad and prolonged" voice of a wolf, dog, or other animals.



I am not sure if it can be used for a human yell. The only time I see references to the word on the web as applied to a human it is either a horror film or very artistic avant garde work like Alan Ginsberg's famous poem.



A native speaker comments would help. Can this refer to a baby's cry? How about a man in emotional pain? How about an irate man?
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August 22nd, 2012 at 2:30:53 PM permalink
Fecha: 22-8-12
Palabra: Holgazanear


Today's SWD means to loaf about. When I see a word like that what comes to my mind is lots of Scrabble points.

Ejemplo time.

Sra. Howell se holgazaneó su muchos años en la isla. = Mrs. Howell loafed around her many years on the island.

On another topic, I'm sure you've heard the song "It's raining men." The question is how would you say in Spanish "The day it rained men."
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August 22nd, 2012 at 8:14:45 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to loaf about.



This verb has a complex etymology. The Latin word follico means to pant or breath heavily. Descended from this word is holgar which means to rest or to be idle. The implication is that it means to rest of working hard, but at times it just translated as lazy. I think a native speaker could weigh in here (or someone dating a native speaker) as to how much it means to be lazy and how much it means to be tired after a hard workout.

Now the Arabic word kâslan, influenced by the Spanish word holgar and the Gallician word lacazán gives us the Spanish noun holgazan and verb holgazanear. They all mean lazy or idle in their languages.


An idiomatic expression using "holgar" (like idle talk) is stated in English as "it goes without saying".
You use the 3rd person present conjugation of holgar (i.e. huelga)
huelga decir que no estaré allí == it goes without saying that I won't be there
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August 24th, 2012 at 7:29:05 PM permalink
I finally got up the nerve to ask about the Gavin McLoud picture. While waiting for my tutor, I took the picture off and showed it to the store owner and asked, "Do you know who this is?" She did. I then buttered her up with a lot of Love Boat trivia questions.

However, it began to turn into a spectacle reminiscent of me in my single days, trying to ask a girl out on a date. Lots of small talk to break the ice, but unable to get up the courage to get to the point.

Fortunately, the store owner must have seen my agony and just said "Do you want the picture?" I breathed a big sign of relief and said, "Please! I'm a big fan of the Love Boat, and that picture has been up there unclaimed for at least several months." So she said, "Go ahead, just take it."



In other news, I think we have to face the reality that without Nareed, or perhaps another dedicated native speaker, this thread is dead. I'm not going to sign the death certificate yet, but will check back for a sign of life from time to time.
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August 24th, 2012 at 7:58:46 PM permalink
Look up "tímido."

Beep!
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August 24th, 2012 at 8:55:49 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In other news, I think we have to face the reality that without Nareed, or perhaps another dedicated native speaker, this thread is dead. I'm not going to sign the death certificate yet, but will check back for a sign of life from time to time.



I'm glad Nareed is back. I don't recognize many of these words. The dictionary defines "holgar" as "to rest after labor" or " to be unnecessary". Those definitions are radically different although they seem to come from the same basic concept. I try to look for cartoons or images that may convey the common meaning, but I don't think I ever heard the word while I was in Mexico.
pacomartin
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August 27th, 2012 at 2:12:04 AM permalink


My third cousin came to New York from Spain. He is a philosophy professor at Ciudad Rodrigo (15 miles from the Portuguese border). It's an old castle town. The Spanish government has turned many of the remote historic structures into hotels called paradors. This allows them to generate income so they can be maintained.

The province of Salamanca (pop 350K) is part of the former Kingdom of León which lasted in some form for over 900 years. Spanish teaching is a big part of the economy, because some students want to learn , as close as possible, the original Spanish dialect. Salamanca began being resettled by Christians after the armies took Toledo in 1085 just a few years before the first crusade.
Wizard
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September 1st, 2012 at 7:15:47 AM permalink
Thanks for the pictures and the post, Paco.

I recently finished this book.



I thought it was outstanding. Unlike Cuentos Españoles, which I wrote about earlier, this book was written recently, and as far as I can in Mexican Spanish. The Spanish is pretty easy, just about perfect for my level.

In the notes at the end of the book the author relates a huge controversy about how to translate "The Day it Snowed Tortillas." In fact I asked how to translate a similar sentence earlier, but didn't get any response to it. The issue is the word "snowed." Should it be "nevó" or "nevaron." He said that when he asked native speakers they were roughly equally split between the two. So, he finally took it to the Academia Real, who said that nevaron was correct.

I think it is similar to the sentence we covered in great detail earlier in this thread, how to translate "One is able to see many stars on a clear night." If the one performing the action of the verb is not clearly identified, then the subject becomes what would be the direct object in English. In this case, my interpretation is that tortillas becomes the subject of the verb, and since it is plural, the correct conjugation is based on the ellos form of he preterit.
"For with much wisdom comes much sorrow." -- Ecclesiastes 1:18 (NIV)
pacomartin
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September 1st, 2012 at 10:50:19 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In the notes at the end of the book the author relates a huge controversy about how to translate "The Day it Snowed Tortillas." In fact I asked how to translate a similar sentence earlier, but didn't get any response to it. The issue is the word "snowed." Should it be "nevó" or "nevaron." He said that when he asked native speakers they were roughly equally split between the two. So, he finally took it to the Academia Real, who said that nevaron was correct.



I thought the note was interesting enough that I am reproducing it (properly credited). My aunt (who learned European Spanish) suggested that if she saw the title in Spanish, she would translate it into English as Tortillas snowed that day. Her English translation removes any doubt that the subject of the sentence is "tortillas".

The grammatical form of using "it" as a vague subject is common in English, but the construct doesn't exist in Spanish. So native speakers are divided about how to translate the phrase.

Quote: The Day It Snowed Tortillas / El Dia Que Nevaron Tortillas, Folktales told in Spanish and English: The Trials of a Title: Joe Hayes

It may be when you read the Spanish title of this book, you thought, Shouldn't it be "El dia que nevó tortillas?" If so, you're not the only one who has wondered that. The first time I translated the story, I used the verb form nevó, but by the time the book was published I decided that the better from was nevaron, and that's how the title appeared in the first edition.

However, an editor who read the book, a native speaker of Spanish who had been educated in Latin America, insisted that I had committed an error and that the verb should be changed to nevó. It was changed in the second edition, and that how the title stood until I began preparing the manuscript for the present book. When the publisher showed advance publicity to a variety of Spanish editors, all of them native speakers from Spain or Latin America, a disagreement emerged. Some were certain that I should say nevaron tortillas, others were equally convinced the correct expression was nevó tortillas. Still others said that both were correct and that I should just do as pleased.

Finally, an editor carried the question to the highest court of arbitration: La Real Academia de la Lengua Española. We received our answer: La frase que usted propone se redactaría del siguiente modo: "El día que nevaron tortillas" . From their data bank, the Academy sent examples of analogous expressions in contemporary writing. And so the book has the title which you see. When you tell the story, however, if it feels better to say "el día que nevó tortilla", feel perfectly free to do it!



A play using "el día que nevó tortilla".
Wizard
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September 1st, 2012 at 10:23:00 PM permalink
Paco, did you read the book? Sorry but I haven't watch that video yet.

Hoy pongo mi nombre para el Las Vegas media maratón. La carrera es Deciembre 2. Desde la media maratón anterior ha estoy flojo con mi corriendo. Hoy, tal vez puedo correr tres miles. Solo dos meses para preparo. Ya pago, entonces tengo la motivación a correr mas. Quiero terminar en menos de dos horas.

Please do not bother correcting this, or at least the whole thing. I would prefer to see a personal response in Spanish.
"For with much wisdom comes much sorrow." -- Ecclesiastes 1:18 (NIV)
pacomartin
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September 2nd, 2012 at 2:35:57 AM permalink
Eso es muy bueno que usted está entrando en carreras con su apretada agenda.ÿSu hijo también corren, o es demasiado tarde?


Desde que corri­ la media maraton anterior he estado flojo con mi corriendo.
"Desde que" is a standard opening phrase that means "since".
I think that you need a verb in Spanish, even if it English is more flexible.
The word "ha" is 3rd person; "he" is 1st person.
For compound verbs you use the past participle.

MY ALTERNATE LETTERS ARE SCREWING UP
Nareed
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September 2nd, 2012 at 4:31:38 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Please do not bother correcting this, or at least the whole thing.



good choice. As per your push-up rules, you'd be too tired to run a marathon if you had to do them all ;)

Quote:

I would prefer to see a personal response in Spanish.



En cuanto posteés algo que se pueda comprender :P
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
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September 2nd, 2012 at 5:05:42 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

En cuanto posteés algo que se pueda comprender :P



My disk crashed and I had to reload most of the software. I was on the hunt for drivers and codecs that were all erased. I am not sure why the Spanish letters are no longer posting correctly.

As you can see I can't even quote Nareed without it changing the letters.
Nareed
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September 3rd, 2012 at 4:38:21 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In the notes at the end of the book the author relates a huge controversy about how to translate "The Day it Snowed Tortillas." In fact I asked how to translate a similar sentence earlier, but didn't get any response to it. The issue is the word "snowed." Should it be "nevó" or "nevaron." He said that when he asked native speakers they were roughly equally split between the two. So, he finally took it to the Academia Real, who said that nevaron was correct.



You have a host of issues here. For one thing, snow is rare in Spanish-speaking countries. Oh, there are a few regions here and there where snow is a regular part of winter, but not many and not highly populated. Then there's usage. There are three types of precipitation: lluvia, granizo and nieve. The associated verbs are llover, granizar and nevar.

Now, when describing the weahter yesterday, you may hear words like llovió, granizó or nevó. But not a word of what the rain, hail or snow was made of. So in the impossible case that tortillas were to fall like snowflakes, most people would describe that as "una lluvia de tortillas," as few Spanish speakers would think of snow at all.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
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September 4th, 2012 at 12:54:22 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

So in the impossible case that tortillas were to fall like snowflakes, most people would describe that as "una lluvia de tortillas," as few Spanish speakers would think of snow at all.


I am leaving off the accented vowels until I figure out why my browser is screwing up

It's interesting point. Joe Hayes, the author of the story, is not a native language Spanish speaker, as he was born in Pittsburgh PA, where it snows a lot. But he moved to Arizona in the 1950's when he was very young and learned Spanish as a young boy.

He published the story 30 years ago (when he was age 36), when he used nevo as the verb conjugation. I wrote him a note, and he responded:

Quote: Joe Hayes

Hi Frank,
Thanks for your note. Yes, it's a curious matter. I sometimes think I should have gone with the technically incorrect, but more popularly used verb form "El dia que llovio tortillas."



I thought it was very strange that he would accidentally change the title from snow to rain, given that this is his signature story. Maybe after decades of living in the southwest, he no longer thinks of snow before rain.

It does snow in Madrid at times.
pacomartin
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September 21st, 2012 at 9:56:54 AM permalink
There is a very common Spanish word that everyone knows (even English speakers) that is used as an interjection during the ancient national sport. However, if you think about it, the word is actually Arabic in origin. What is the word, and what is the Arab equivalent? You have to figure out the sport.
Wizard
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September 21st, 2012 at 10:53:48 AM permalink
I'm going to go with "Ole!" from bull fighting. I don't think I know a single word of Arabic, so will hope for two out of three.
"For with much wisdom comes much sorrow." -- Ecclesiastes 1:18 (NIV)
pacomartin
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September 22nd, 2012 at 3:05:41 AM permalink
والله

Wizard is correct. It isn't so much that I expect anyone to know the Arabic language, but what is the one word you would expect Arabs to say?
WongBo
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September 23rd, 2012 at 7:11:58 AM permalink
I believe ole' is directly descended from shouts of "Allah"

I know that there are literally thousands of Spanish word that trace their entymology to Arabic.
In a bet, there is a fool and a thief. - Proverb.
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