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Nareed
Nareed
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September 20th, 2011 at 2:27:45 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The Latin word has not come down into any languages as far as I know, but the meaning "she who earns" has certainly been retained as "working girl".



Well, we retained "meretricious," which isn't common, but I imagine people who like to show off their vocabulary will use it.

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Since words related to sex are so subject to innuendo and street slang, they seem to have complex etymology.



Words related to sex are one thing. Words unrelated to sex but used for sexual terms are another. Pray tell, for example, how "come," a perfectly harmless word, came to mean what it does today? BTW that piece of slang is also used in Spanish for some reason (I have to try to stay on topic, don't I?)
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Wizard
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September 20th, 2011 at 3:08:38 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Speaking of hooks and corners, a very important Spanish word that you will see in a lot of geographic names in Latin America and Southwest USA is Rincón which means corner. See if you can infer the meaning of rincón los borrachos (not you Nareed). It is actually one of those words (like olé) which is borrowed from the Arab occupation of Spain ( ركن ) . The latin derived word for corner is esquina which I don't believe is used in any Place names.



I think I heard of the Hook in New York theory as well. It isn't as good of a story at General Hooker. As I learned from the Book of Mormon musical, the important thing is to believe, not whether what you believe is true.

I thought the word for corner is esquina. Then again, it would making learning languages too easy if there were just one word for everything. Perhaps it means corner more as a verb. So, I know that borracho means drunk, and I didn't have to look it up. I think it came up a while back in this thread. So my bust guess is "corner of drunks." I would feel better about it there was a de in there, but it seems anything goes with Spanish idioms. That might make for a good name for a bar on a street corner. Or perhaps a the English equivalent of a "drunk tank." There is that word tank again.

Okay, question for the audience (i.e. Paco), there is a casino called Harrah's Rincon near San Diego. Does that Rincon share the same meaning as corner?
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Nareed
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September 20th, 2011 at 3:14:19 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The latin derived word for corner is esquina which I don't believe is used in any Place names.



There being so many names, I wouldn't be so sure.

In any case, it's used for giving directions and addresses, like "Chapultepec esquina con Arcos de Belén."

So, ridiculous trivia question of the day: what's wrong with the address given above?
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Nareed
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September 20th, 2011 at 3:23:05 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought the word for corner is esquina. Then again, it would making learning languages too easy if there were just one word for everything. Perhaps it means corner more as a verb.



No, it's a noun. But it's not used the same way as corner. If I tell you we'll meet "en el rincón de Flamingo y el Strip," you should lok at me odd and say "¿Que?"

Rincón is used more to refer to a corner formed by walls inside a structure. When punishing a child, you'd tell him "¡Al rincón!" not "¡A la esquina!" Esquina is the corner formed by streets.

Rincón also means a small, usually enclosed or ensconced space, given over to a perticualr group or activity, a niche as it were, thoug there's a separate word for niche (nicho, as it turns out).

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So, I know that borracho means drunk, and I didn't have to look it up.



Have you ever tried borrachitos? If not, remind me to bring some next time I go to Vegas, and some insuline to go with them....

Quote:

So my bust guess is "corner of drunks." I would feel better about it there was a de in there, but it seems anything goes with Spanish idioms.



There is. Paco missed it, and I missed he missed it because my brain fills it in. Good call.
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pacomartin
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September 20th, 2011 at 4:50:44 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Okay, question for the audience (i.e. Paco), there is a casino called Harrah's Rincon near San Diego. Does that Rincon share the same meaning as corner?



Rincón California is the corner formed by two valley's coming together. Harrah's is very near the intersection of the two roads. Rincón's Arab roots make it a little more poetic than "esquina". You are more likely to use it as a place name.

There is a little peninsula in Western Puerto Rico called Rincón which is very popular with surfers .


Rincón de Guayabitos is a fairly isolated peninsula near Puerto Vallarta, with the luxurious Four Seasons Punta Mita and the St. Regis.
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September 21st, 2011 at 8:54:19 AM permalink
Fecha: Sep 21, 2011
Palabra del día: QUEJAR


Today's word, quejarse means complain. I'm not sure why it is reflexive, but that is another issue.

Ejemplo time:

Debes quejarse del pelo en tu sopa. = You should complain about the hair in your soup. I'm not sure del is right, Spanish propositions always give me trouble. Where English uses "about" it seems Spanish can use de, para, por, sobre, and who knows what else.
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Nareed
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September 21st, 2011 at 9:11:40 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: Sep 21, 2011
Palabra del día: QUEJAR



Quejar = To complain

Quote:

Today's word, quejarse means complain. I'm not sure why it is reflexive, but that is another issue.



I'm so not good with grammar. anyway:

Quote:

Ejemplo time:

Debes quejarse del pelo en tu sopa. = You should complain about the hair in your soup.



Debes quejarTE del pelo en tu sopa. As you can see, the rest is right.
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Wizard
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September 21st, 2011 at 9:36:17 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Debes quejarTE del pelo en tu sopa. As you can see, the rest is right.



Forgive the stupid question, but why the TE? This seems to say that you should complain to yourself about the hair in the soup.
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Nareed
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September 21st, 2011 at 10:07:06 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Forgive the stupid question, but why the TE? This seems to say that you should complain to yourself about the hair in the soup.



I would be a lto easier if I could identify the tense being used, In any case, you're using the second person singular in the familiar form, tu, and the proper word to use is "quejarte." if you were using the formal form of the pronoun, usted, then you should say "debe quejarSE"
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pacomartin
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September 21st, 2011 at 1:26:45 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: Sep 21, 2011
Palabra del día: QUEJAR


Today's word, quejarse means complain. I'm not sure why it is reflexive, but that is another issue.

Ejemplo time:

Debes quejarse del pelo en tu sopa. = You should complain about the hair in your soup. I'm not sure del is right, Spanish propositions always give me trouble. Where English uses "about" it seems Spanish can use de, para, por, sobre, and who knows what else.



(I) first point
If you look up quejar in RAE . (Del lat. *quassiare, de quassare, golpear violentamente, quebrantar).
1. tr. aquejar
which implies that quejar andaquejar have the same meaning (to afflict)

aquejar. (De quejarse).
1. tr. Acongojar, afligir, fatigar (to grieve, to afflict, to fatigue)

a "reflexive" verb is used when the subject of a verb is the same as the object
the "object" (in this case a hair) is afflicting you


(II) second point
"quejarse" is listed as a "verb+preposition" . In general "verb+preposition" can correspond to a different preposition than used in English, or in English to no preposition at all. For "quejarse" the preposition is "de"

(III) third point
the sentence is using the "de" + "el" contraction "del" so we are not breaking the second point

(IV) fourth point
As Nareed pointed out, use the following combinations
Debes quejarte
Debe quejarse

As an exercise using the "first person" of "poder" translate No Puedo Quejarme más

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