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pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 9th, 2011 at 3:17:18 PM permalink
Those hotel rooms in downtown Vegas are $25 to $30 a night. There is little advantage to renting a room by the hour, as it would not make sense to rent for much less. Now some people probably don't sleep there.

The "telo" can be very romantic. And certainly many hotels in the US cater to married couples who simply want to get away from their lives for the day. Many of these hotels now have expensive equipment that most couples can't afford at home or are unwilling to explain to their children.

Wizard
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October 9th, 2011 at 11:06:48 PM permalink
Fecha: 10 de Octobre, 2011
Palabra: Meter


Today's word is one of the more difficult words I have encountered in Spanish. It means a whole host of different usages in English. I'm sure Spanish speakers learning English feel the same way about words like "run," which has about 100 different usages.

Here are some of the usages mentioned at spanishdict.com:

1. To place or to put in, to include one thing within another, to get on.
2. To smuggle goods into a country (géneros).
3. To make, to cause (causar), to occasion, to urge, to move.
4. To engage, to prevail upon, to induce.
5. To stake (dinero), to put to hazard.
6. To cram down victuals.
7. To put things close together, to cram or heap them together.
8. To impose upon, to deceive.
9. To compress, to straighten, to reduce.
10. (coll.) To eat.
11. To meddle, to intermeddle, to interfere.
12. To be on terms of familiarity with a person.
13. To choose a profession or trade.
14. To be led astray, to plunge into vice.
15. To empty into the sea (ríos).
16. To attack sword in hand.
17. To go into, to get into (introducirse).
18. To extend, to project.
19. To provoke somebody (provocar).

What many have in common is putting something into something else, in part to get rid of it. Others have to do with choosing something or getting into a different place. Meter seems to be a strong word regarding a change of state of something important. While it has a lot of usages, I don't seem to see it a great deal.

Ejemplo time.

No meterse in mis problemas. = Don't interfere in my problems.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 10th, 2011 at 2:31:12 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 10 de Octobre, 2011
Palabra: Meter

3. To make, to cause (causar), to occasion, to urge, to move.

Meter seems to be a strong word regarding a change of state of something important. While it has a lot of usages, I don't seem to see it a great deal.



While not immediately obvious a related English word is mission which is a noun derived from the verb with a meaning similar to definition #4. It agrees with the Wizard's description as "regarding a change of state of something important".

A related word in Spanish is someter or English submit which literally means "to put in a state of being underneath".

In English there are hundreds of words that begin with the suffix sub- and many of them have a perfectly comprehensive root words, like subhuman, suburban, and subtask.

Others words are like "submit", and "subvert" where the root does not mean anything in English. Subvert literally means "to pour under" although we are much more likely to say "destroy". Spanish, being closer to Latin, is often still be using the root word. For instance vertir means "to pour" in Spanish.

The English root "mit" is from Latin "mittĕre" which gives us Spanish "meter".
Nareed
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October 10th, 2011 at 6:35:07 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's word is one of the more difficult words I have encountered in Spanish. It means a whole host of different usages in English. I'm sure Spanish speakers learning English feel the same way about words like "run," which has about 100 different usages.



I won't vouch for all the meanings you found. However, the meaning most used is "to put in." The second would be "to get oneself in"

Examples:

Mete la ropa a la maleta = Put the clothes in the suitcase.
Métete a la cama = Go to bed.
Metí mi dinero en la bolsa = I put my money into the stock market.

Quote:

No meterse in mis problemas. = Don't interfere in my problems.



You're slipping.

No TE METAS EN mis problemas = Don't butt into my problelms.

OR:

No te metas en mis asuntos = Stay out of my business.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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October 10th, 2011 at 9:58:03 PM permalink
Thanks, as always for your help. I didn't have any questions so let's move on.

Fecha: 11 de Octobre, 2011
Palabras: Añadir y Agregar


Today we have two words which both mean to add. What is the difference?, you might ask. I wrote out a long paragraph trying to explain it, but realized at the end I really didn't know, so erased it.

Ejemplo time.

¿Tienes algo que añadir nuestra discusión? = Do you have anything to add to our discussion?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 11th, 2011 at 2:57:08 AM permalink
I pulled this question out of a blog: Alguien me podria decir como puedo añadir un boton de "agregar a favoritos" con javascript?
I would translate it to: Is there anyone who can tell me how to add a button to "aggregate of favorites" with Javascript?

In English "to aggregate" and "to add up" are synonyms, but we use them at different times.


Quote: rae definitions


agregar. (Del lat. aggregāre).
1. tr. Unir o juntar unas personas o cosas a otras. U. t. c. prnl.
2. tr. Añadir algo a lo ya dicho o escrito.
3. tr. Destinar a alguien a un cuerpo u oficina o asociarlo a otro empleado, pero sin darle plaza efectiva.
4. tr. anexar.

añadir. (Del lat. *inaddĕre, de addĕre, añadir).
1. tr. Agregar, incorporar algo a otra cosa.
2. tr. Aumentar, acrecentar, ampliar.

anexar. (De anexo).
1. tr. Unir o agregar algo a otra cosa con dependencia de ella.
2. tr. Guat., Hond. y Ven. adjuntar (‖ enviar algo juntamente con un escrito).



The RAE uses one word to translate the other. Usually when the RAE says U. t. c. prnl. or "usado también como pronomial" it gives a pronomial (reflexive) definition as well. Not in this case. All definitions are "transitive".


Latin adgregō
Etymology
From ad + gregō (to+“collect, assemble”).
I bring, attach or add to a crowd or flock; lump together.
(reflexive) I attach to myself, follow or adhere to.
Nareed
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October 11th, 2011 at 7:40:17 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 11 de Octobre, 2011
Palabras: Añadir y Agregar


Today we have two words which both mean to add. What is the difference?, you might ask. I wrote out a long paragraph trying to explain it, but realized at the end I really didn't know, so erased it.



I can't say I know, either, come to think of it. I tend to use "agregar" more becase I mislike using the "ñ" sound at all if it can be avoided. BUt other than that the verbs are synonimous. I don't see the point, but neither do I see the point of the letters "s" and "z" coexisting in the same alphabet.

Quote:

Ejemplo time.

¿Tienes algo que añadir nuestra discusión? = Do you have anything to add to our discussion?



I'm trying to come up with a reason why that should be "agregar" rather than "añadir," but I just can't think of one. Other than that's the term I'd use, which of course isn't a compelling reason :) Oh, it looks wrong to say "añadir," but I can't say why.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Nareed
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October 11th, 2011 at 8:01:36 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

In English "to aggregate" and "to add up" are synonyms, but we use them at different times.



While I had an excellent English teacher, some of my learning was informal. In that sense, I gather that "aggregate" also means something like "the sum of" as used in business sometimes. I think it's also a noun used in construction as part of how concrete should be mixed. Something about sand, cement, water and aggregate.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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October 11th, 2011 at 8:19:41 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I'm trying to come up with a reason why that should be "agregar" rather than "añadir," but I just can't think of one. Other than that's the term I'd use, which of course isn't a compelling reason :) Oh, it looks wrong to say "añadir," but I can't say why.



Oxford did a lot of research about the preferences towards one word over another when they are synonyms. For instance we always say "grocery bag" and not "grocery sack" and we are much more likely to refer to an "eccentric uncle" than a "quirky uncle". In many cases there is no underlying reason, it is just custom.
Wizard
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October 11th, 2011 at 8:25:44 AM permalink
Aggregate and sum basically do mean the same thing, but are used in different situations. Sum gets used about 50 times as often in everyday speech. Aggregate is more likely to be used in a legal or scientific sense. George Carlin would probably say that "aggregate" is the kind of word people say to sound smarter, but that we don't really need in the language. I too tend to avoid long words when a shorter one will do just fine.

In Spanish I seem to see agregar and añadir about equally as often, and I can't put in writing any difference in context, although I have thoughts swirling around in my head about it.

Today is Martes, which means my housecleaner Lupe comes over. I asked her about this and she said the two words are el mismo. Then again, I don't think she is the highest source to turn to on the fine points of Spanish grammar.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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