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Curious55
Curious55
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September 27th, 2011 at 3:41:44 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

para la artículo.


el articulo, no ?
Quote: pacomartin

No sé. Porque?


Esta pregunta es una adivinanza que no funciona por escrito.
Normalmente la gente responde que la bola rueda porque la bola es redonda.
Y contesto que no, que lavo la rueda porque esta sucia. :)
pacomartin
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September 27th, 2011 at 4:19:45 AM permalink
Quote: Curious55

el articulo, no ?



Lo siento!
Artículo es un palabra masculino.
Una de las partes en que suelen dividirse los escritos.
Curious55
Curious55
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September 27th, 2011 at 4:32:40 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

es un palabra masculino.


una palabra masculina
No problem ! :))
pacomartin
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September 27th, 2011 at 5:17:21 AM permalink
Quote: Curious55

una palabra masculina No problem ! :))



Gender is a pervasive problem. My grandfather was a native Spanish speaker, and he lived with us or within 1.5 miles as I was growing up. Unfortunately I didn't spend significant time with the language as a child.

Research indicates that it is a significant part of the way people think. For instance bridge in German is the feminine "die Brücke" while in Spanish it is masculine "el puente". If you ask a German-speakers to describe a bridge he will use traditionally feminine adjectives, while a Spanish speaker will immediately go to masculine adjectives (sturdy, towering, big, etc.).
Wizard
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September 27th, 2011 at 7:00:17 AM permalink
Fecha: 27 de Sep. 2011
Palabra: fruto seco


Today's word, in this case two words, fruto seco = nut. Individually, fruto = fruit, and seco=dry. Say what? Botanically speaking, a nut is different from fruit in other ways than being dry. For example, a nut has a shell, and the nut itself is a seed. Botany is not my strong point, but my brother is a botanist, should we need to consult one. Also, if they call a nut "dry fruit," then what do they call actual dried fruit, like the kind they put in fruitcake?



Other words that come up for nut in Spanish are: nuez, cacahuete, tuerca, and maní. I'm not sure if these are regional differences or specific kinds of nuts. So there is plenty for the experts to explain.

Ejemplo time.

Por favor, no pones los fruto secos en mi ensalada, porque soy los alérgico. = Please don't put nuts in my salad, because I am allergic to them.
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Alan
Alan
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September 27th, 2011 at 7:13:46 AM permalink
tuerca= a nut for a bolt, according to my expert.
pacomartin
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September 27th, 2011 at 8:08:51 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Also, if they call a nut "dry fruit," then what do they call actual dried fruit, like the kind they put in fruitcake?



Dried apricots, are known in Spanish as orejones or "big ears" because of their shape.




In Madrid be sure and get some:

Nareed
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September 27th, 2011 at 3:28:21 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's word, in this case two words, fruto seco = nut. Individually, fruto = fruit, and seco=dry.



Not entirely. there's no generic everyday word for "nut" in Spanish. There's a word, "nuez" which means a specific nut. For isnatnce, "nuez de la India" means cashew. In Mexico if you ask for nueces, you get pecans more often than not, though the variety is called "nuez de castilla." Other nuts each have their onw names, as you noted blow (except "tuerca" which is the metal part with a threaded inside that gets paired with screws or bolts).

"Fruto seco" does mean nuts, but it0s not a common every day word. it's a botanical or biological term.


Quote:

Also, if they call a nut "dry fruit," then what do they call actual dried fruit, like the kind they put in fruitcake?



Inedible.

Seriously, it's called "fruta seca." I don't know why. I mean, i know why, it's furit that's been dried up, but I don't know why the distinction between that term and "fruto seco." In some places they'll call it "fruta deshidratada" which means "dehydrated fruit."

Actually I like dried apples, but not any other kind of dried fruit. Oh, I can eat dreid pineapple with powdered chili, but that's it.

Quote:

Other words that come up for nut in Spanish are: nuez, cacahuete, tuerca, and maní. I'm not sure if these are regional differences or specific kinds of nuts. So there is plenty for the experts to explain.



See above.

Cacahuate and mani both mean peanuts. Aside from that all I can think to add is "almendra" for almond. I know the names of a few more, but not what they're called in English. Oh, and nutmeg is called "nuez moscada." BTW I've never found that if that's a nut or it's just named that way. I've only seen it powdered in a jar.

Quote:

Por favor, no pones los fruto secos en mi ensalada, porque soy los alérgico. = Please don't put nuts in my salad, because I am allergic to them.



Please tell me you let the google language masher do your homework.

"Por favor no LE PONGAS nueces a mi ensalada, porque soy alérgico."

Alternatively: "Por favor no PONGAS frutos secos en la ensalada, porque soy alérgico."

There's no concise way to say "allergic to them" that doesn't sound redundant the way Spanish is normally used. So it's better to drop it.

Now, although I said there's no generic word for nuts, "nueces" comes closest for use in a sentence. At a restaurant, though, especially if you are really allergic, you should specify "sin nueces, almendras, cacahutes, etc."
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Wizard
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September 27th, 2011 at 4:34:38 PM permalink
Quote: wiz

Por favor, no pones los fruto secos en mi ensalada, porque soy los alérgico.



Quote: Nareed

Por favor no LE PONGAS nueces a mi ensalada, porque soy alérgico.



Grammar is not exactly my strong point. Pronouns give me all kinds of trouble.

The reason for the los was my way of saying "them." I can see how it would be obvious by context without it, but I was trying to be clear. I admit I blew it by putting it after soy. What would you say if I put porque los soy alérgico.

I see your alternative version leaves out the le. Can you just tell me why you put it in there in your version above?
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pacomartin
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September 27th, 2011 at 5:41:35 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The reason for the los was my way of saying "them." I can see how it would be obvious by context without it, but I was trying to be clear.



If you want to be specific then I think you would say "porque soy alérgico a ellos".

EDIT
Nareed says the second version is more appropriate. I would think that the second form translate more to "because I am allergic to those"
(1) porque soy alérgico a ellos
(2) porque soy alérgico a estas

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