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Wizard
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Wizard
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September 1st, 2012 at 10:23:00 PM permalink
Paco, did you read the book? Sorry but I haven't watch that video yet.

Hoy pongo mi nombre para el Las Vegas media maratón. La carrera es Deciembre 2. Desde la media maratón anterior ha estoy flojo con mi corriendo. Hoy, tal vez puedo correr tres miles. Solo dos meses para preparo. Ya pago, entonces tengo la motivación a correr mas. Quiero terminar en menos de dos horas.

Please do not bother correcting this, or at least the whole thing. I would prefer to see a personal response in Spanish.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 2nd, 2012 at 2:35:57 AM permalink
Eso es muy bueno que usted está entrando en carreras con su apretada agenda.ÿSu hijo también corren, o es demasiado tarde?


Desde que corri­ la media maraton anterior he estado flojo con mi corriendo.
"Desde que" is a standard opening phrase that means "since".
I think that you need a verb in Spanish, even if it English is more flexible.
The word "ha" is 3rd person; "he" is 1st person.
For compound verbs you use the past participle.

MY ALTERNATE LETTERS ARE SCREWING UP
Nareed
Nareed
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September 2nd, 2012 at 4:31:38 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Please do not bother correcting this, or at least the whole thing.



good choice. As per your push-up rules, you'd be too tired to run a marathon if you had to do them all ;)

Quote:

I would prefer to see a personal response in Spanish.



En cuanto posteés algo que se pueda comprender :P
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 2nd, 2012 at 5:05:42 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

En cuanto posteés algo que se pueda comprender :P



My disk crashed and I had to reload most of the software. I was on the hunt for drivers and codecs that were all erased. I am not sure why the Spanish letters are no longer posting correctly.

As you can see I can't even quote Nareed without it changing the letters.
Nareed
Nareed
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September 3rd, 2012 at 4:38:21 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

In the notes at the end of the book the author relates a huge controversy about how to translate "The Day it Snowed Tortillas." In fact I asked how to translate a similar sentence earlier, but didn't get any response to it. The issue is the word "snowed." Should it be "nevó" or "nevaron." He said that when he asked native speakers they were roughly equally split between the two. So, he finally took it to the Academia Real, who said that nevaron was correct.



You have a host of issues here. For one thing, snow is rare in Spanish-speaking countries. Oh, there are a few regions here and there where snow is a regular part of winter, but not many and not highly populated. Then there's usage. There are three types of precipitation: lluvia, granizo and nieve. The associated verbs are llover, granizar and nevar.

Now, when describing the weahter yesterday, you may hear words like llovió, granizó or nevó. But not a word of what the rain, hail or snow was made of. So in the impossible case that tortillas were to fall like snowflakes, most people would describe that as "una lluvia de tortillas," as few Spanish speakers would think of snow at all.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 4th, 2012 at 12:54:22 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

So in the impossible case that tortillas were to fall like snowflakes, most people would describe that as "una lluvia de tortillas," as few Spanish speakers would think of snow at all.


I am leaving off the accented vowels until I figure out why my browser is screwing up

It's interesting point. Joe Hayes, the author of the story, is not a native language Spanish speaker, as he was born in Pittsburgh PA, where it snows a lot. But he moved to Arizona in the 1950's when he was very young and learned Spanish as a young boy.

He published the story 30 years ago (when he was age 36), when he used nevo as the verb conjugation. I wrote him a note, and he responded:

Quote: Joe Hayes

Hi Frank,
Thanks for your note. Yes, it's a curious matter. I sometimes think I should have gone with the technically incorrect, but more popularly used verb form "El dia que llovio tortillas."



I thought it was very strange that he would accidentally change the title from snow to rain, given that this is his signature story. Maybe after decades of living in the southwest, he no longer thinks of snow before rain.

It does snow in Madrid at times.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 21st, 2012 at 9:56:54 AM permalink
There is a very common Spanish word that everyone knows (even English speakers) that is used as an interjection during the ancient national sport. However, if you think about it, the word is actually Arabic in origin. What is the word, and what is the Arab equivalent? You have to figure out the sport.
Wizard
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Wizard
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September 21st, 2012 at 10:53:48 AM permalink
I'm going to go with "Ole!" from bull fighting. I don't think I know a single word of Arabic, so will hope for two out of three.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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September 22nd, 2012 at 3:05:41 AM permalink
والله

Wizard is correct. It isn't so much that I expect anyone to know the Arabic language, but what is the one word you would expect Arabs to say?
WongBo
WongBo
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September 23rd, 2012 at 7:11:58 AM permalink
I believe ole' is directly descended from shouts of "Allah"

I know that there are literally thousands of Spanish word that trace their entymology to Arabic.
In a bet, there is a fool and a thief. - Proverb.

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