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pacomartin
pacomartin
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August 12th, 2012 at 11:54:03 AM permalink


Murió uno de los cachorritos salvados de un incendio por una perra en Chile

The word cachorritos is based on a Basque word. I don't know if it is more or less common than perrito in Mexico. This female dog took her 5 puppies out of a burning building and put them on the fire truck where she thought they would be safe, unfortunately one was already too injured.
Nareed
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August 12th, 2012 at 12:49:30 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

The word cachorritos is based on a Basque word. I don't know if it is more or less common than perrito in Mexico.



I've a chaotic kitchen going (the best kind) so:

Cachorro: puppy

Perrito/a: doggie, small/little dog.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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August 12th, 2012 at 6:49:22 PM permalink
Fecha: 12-8-12
Palabra: Arruinar


Today's SWD means to ruin. "How does that differ from estropear, you ask?" Estopear seems to be used much more often. My guess, based on context, is that arruinar is a stronger word, probably used when something really important was ruined, or just for emphasis.

BTW, Estopear was the SWD on 3/4/12.

Ejemplo time.

No hables tan fuerte, o el souflet se arruinada. = Don't talk so loudly, or the soufflé will be ruined.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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August 12th, 2012 at 7:53:02 PM permalink
Estropear = To spoil.

Arruinar = To ruin.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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August 12th, 2012 at 8:29:28 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Estropear seems to be used much more often.




Spanish estropear is from Italian stroppiare which is a variant of storpiare which is from vulgar Latin exturpiare which is derived from Latin turpis which is an ancestor of English turpitude.

The English word 'turpitude' is an older word that means "depravity, infamy" related to that which is"vile, ugly, base, shameful".

See the Shakespearean quote from Antony and Cleopatra (IV, 6)
I am alone the villain of the earth,
And feel I am so most. O Antony,
Thou mine of bounty, how wouldst thou have paid
My better service, when my turpitude
Thou dost so crown with gold!


I realize the English word is archaic, but if you run into it now if you read it, you will recognize it.
================
A Spanish idiom for spoil is "echar a perder" which I heard in Oaxaca, although it more literally translates as "throwing to lose"


The title of this book from the cartoon is clearly "How to ruin a relationship in 10 days". The word ligue looks like "league" which must be a Spanish idiom for "relationship".
Wizard
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August 13th, 2012 at 7:33:46 AM permalink
I see that magazine she is holding says trajes de novia. Is that the term for a wedding dress?

My tutor said in Peru a novia is a fiance. I asked her what the term would be for a girlfriend you're not engaged to. As I recall, she said there is no particular term.

Speaking of this topic, one flaw in the English language are the terms "boyfriend and girlfriend." They are fine up to a certain age, like 25, but just start to sound silly as you get older than that. I had quite the feminist girlfriend in college who would have bitten by head off if I used that term about her, and she was only 20 or 21 at the time. She was a psychology major, so suggested the term "significant other."
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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August 13th, 2012 at 7:59:57 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I see that magazine she is holding says trajes de novia. Is that the term for a wedding dress?



It's used in some countries. The proper term is "vestido de novia." BTW, in English the proper term is "wedding gown," but there are exceptions as not all possible wedding dresses are actually gowns. And to finish this train of thought, there is no word in Spanish for "gown."

Quote:

My tutor said in Peru a novia is a fiance. I asked her what the term would be for a girlfriend you're not engaged to. As I recall, she said there is no particular term.



Those wacky Peruvians :)

Novia = girlfriend = bride
Novio = boyfirend = groom

Depending on the context, of course.

Fiance = Prometida/o

Quote:

Speaking of this topic, one flaw in the English language are the terms "boyfriend and girlfriend." They are fine up to a certain age, like 25, but just start to sound silly as you get older than that.



No, it doesn't. Delusional, maybe, but not silly :P
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pacomartin
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August 13th, 2012 at 10:18:49 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

My tutor said in Peru a novia is a fiance. I asked her what the term would be for a girlfriend you're not engaged to. As I recall, she said there is no particular term. Speaking of this topic, one flaw in the English language are the terms "boyfriend and girlfriend."



The languages were formed in an earlier time when social mores were very different. Now you have FWB for "friends with benefits" and BC for "benefits without bothering with the friendship". Plus "baby mama" for the mother of your child with whom you have little or no contact with, and does not interfere with you FWB and you BC's.

When I went to school in Oaxaca there was a young kid (age 19-20) from Philadelphia who wanted to work in a mission to the Mazatec indians. He was a good looking kid, but he grew up in a big city. In his first week he got caught with a little hand holding (possibly a kiss or two) with a young Mazatec indian and ended up being thrown out. I don't think he had any idea he was doing anything wrong.


A wealthy New York banker went to study under Maria Sabina, a The Mazatec shaman, in 1953, and was responsible for introducing hallucinogens to the western world by virtue of a widely circulated LIFE magazine. The Mazatecs used the hallucinogens as part of a cultural cleansing ceremony. She was actually a serious tobacco smoker, so the widely circulated photo makes people assume that she is smoking a joint.
Doc
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August 13th, 2012 at 10:48:02 AM permalink
That's an interesting culture from a U.S. perspective: Go ahead and do the hallucinogenic drugs, but don't dare kiss a girl you're not ready to marry.

Is that really the culture or did I distort it in the interpretation?
pacomartin
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August 13th, 2012 at 12:53:26 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

That's an interesting culture from a U.S. perspective: Go ahead and do the hallucinogenic drugs, but don't dare kiss a girl you're not ready to marry.

Is that really the culture or did I distort it in the interpretation?



It's a little distorted. They don't do hallucinogens for recreation. They are only part of a rituals.

It's hard to imagine today, but there was a time when most of the Western culture was completely unaware of hallucinogens. They knew about opiates since they were widely used in medicine in the 19th century, and they were aware of cannabis, and obviously alcohol.

On June 29, 1955, R. Gordon Wasson, then a vice president of the prestigious banking firm J.P. Morgan, together with his friend, New York fashion photographer Allan Richardson, made history by becoming the first whites to participate in a velada. The nocturnal mushroom ceremony took place in the remote village of Huautla de Jimenez, in the northeast region of Oaxaca, Mexico under the guidance of Mazatec curandera Maria Sabina.

When they told their story in the 1957 Life magazine article, the editor coined the term "magic mushrooms". After this article, Timothy Leary and others tried hallucinogens and eventually spawned the culture.

Huautla de Jimenez in the Sierra Mazateca is about 150 miles of freeway + 85 miles of local roads from Mexico City airport today. But in 1955 it would have been extremely difficult to reach, and very difficult to find your way around since most people didn't speak Spanish. At the time it wasn't really legal to do these ceremonies and take these drugs, but there was very little direct influence from the government in these small villages.


LSD was first synthesized in 1938, and was first intentionally ingested on April 19, 1943. It was introduced as a drug with trade-name Delysid for clinical psychiatric uses in 1947. But it wasn't until the LIFE magazine article ten years later, and people began experimenting with mushrooms, that the synthetics began to be used as a recreational drug.

The CIA project to use LSD for mind control was officially sanctioned in 1953, but was severely cut back in the 1960's and eliminated entirely by 1973. It was only then that the general public became aware of the project.

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