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Nareed
Nareed
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July 30th, 2012 at 1:06:37 PM permalink
"Seinfeld," without resorting to puns or word-play, nevertheless played a lot with language. Here it was shown with Spanish subtitles, and sometimes the translations were 100% nonsense or actual gibberish. Many were not funny if you relied only on the subtitles.

And no, I don't recall what the subtitles were for "Moops." I'd guess the inevitable, and very understandable "Mopos," as opposed to "Moros." But most of the time I don't even see the subtitles.

In the video above, I'm guessing the subtitles are Portuguese.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 31st, 2012 at 3:34:50 AM permalink
I can see how much of the humor in Seinfeld would not translate well. My favorite episode is the one where George gets Elaine to take his IQ test for him. My favorite character on the show is easily George.

I can't speak for anybody else, but I'm not able to view the YouTube videos you link to. I always get a message that YouTube doesn't support it.

Fecha: 31-07-12
Palabra: leña


Today's SWD means wood. You may be wondering how it differs from madera. I think madera is the usual term, like something is made from wood. Leña, I think, applies more to firewood or in a "lumber" kind of sense. For example, a leñador is a lumberjack.

Ejemplo time.

¿Tienes suficiente leña para durar todo el invierno? = Do you have enough firewood to last through the winter?
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pacomartin
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July 31st, 2012 at 6:40:59 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I can see how much of the humor in Seinfeld would not translate well. My favorite episode is the one where George gets Elaine to take his IQ test for him. My favorite character on the show is easily George.

Today's SWD means wood. You may be wondering how it differs from madera. I think madera is the usual term, like something is made from wood. Leña, I think, applies more to firewood or in a "lumber" kind of sense.



It can be firewood for a stove, a fireplace, or an open hearth kitchen. There was a popular steak place in Tijuana with that name.
Nareed
Nareed
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July 31st, 2012 at 6:50:59 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

¿Tienes suficiente leña para durar todo el invierno? = Do you have enough firewood to last through the winter?



Phrased like that, you're asking if the person will last the winter.

Try: "¿Te va a durar la leña todo el invierno?"
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 31st, 2012 at 8:03:56 AM permalink
Nareed,
Can you hold off on blasting google translate for a second, and look at the translations below.
It looks to me like Google got the first two phrases correct. Do you agree?


1) va a durar
2) te va a durar
3) ¿Te va a durar la leña todo el invierno?
4) ¿Tienes suficiente leña para durar todo el invierno?

1) will last
2) going to last
3) Are you the wood will last all winter?
4) Do you have enough wood to last all winter?
Translations from Google Translate

I would guess the best translation of your sentence is:
Is the wood going to last all winter?
Wizard
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Wizard
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July 31st, 2012 at 9:05:10 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Phrased like that, you're asking if the person will last the winter.



Maybe if the person runs out of firewood he will freeze to death, and thus not last the winter. This is legitimately a concern for people that live in remote places in northern latitudes.

Quote: pacomartin

Is the wood going to last all winter?



This might lead to the follow-up question, what wood?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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July 31st, 2012 at 9:08:31 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

1) va a durar



It will last.

Quote:

2) te va a durar



It will last you.

Quote:

3) ¿Te va a durar la leña todo el invierno?



Will the lumber last you all winter?

Quote:

4) ¿Tienes suficiente leña para durar todo el invierno?



Do you have enough wood for the whole winter?
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Wizard
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Wizard
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August 1st, 2012 at 7:59:01 AM permalink
Fecha: 1-8-12
Palabra: Restregar


Today's SWD means to rub/scrub. How this differs from fregar; I have no idea. In the context I found the word it was used to rub something in somebody's face (out of spite).

Ejemplo time.

Necesita mucho tiempo para restregar el suelo de la cocina con un cepillo de dientes. = It takes a long time to scrub the kitchen floor using a toothbrush.
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Nareed
Nareed
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August 1st, 2012 at 8:39:01 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Necesita mucho tiempo para restregar el suelo de la cocina con un cepillo de dientes. = It takes a long time to scrub the kitchen floor using a toothbrush.



"SE necesita...."

The difference is that "Necesita mucho tiempo..." means someone needs a long time to do something. Whereas "SE necesita mucho tiempo...2 means "it takes a long time...."

In this example the difference it's not worth making, as obviously it will be a person undertaking the demaning task. But if you were to talk of, say, geological processes, you wouldn't say "Necesita mucho tiempo para convertir el carbón en diamante."
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pacomartin
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August 1st, 2012 at 9:16:11 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

How this differs from fregar; I have no idea.



  • fregar means to rub two things together. It can be used in the context of scrubbing the floor with a sponge. It also has the same colloquial meaning as the English phrase "He rubs me the wrong way". It can imply that someone is irritating. The verb 'fregar' is distantly related to words like "friction" in English, and "frito" in Spanish (fried).

    these three other synonyms are a confusing to me:
  • restregar
  • estregar
  • frotar

    They are variously translated as rub, scrape, wipe, rubbing, scraping, and scouring.


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