Thread Rating:

pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
July 16th, 2012 at 11:33:48 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

For the record, I'm not going to indicate today's SWD in the index on the first page of this thread, since detengar is not a legitimate word, as Nareed made perfectly clear.




There is a group of verbs built around tener which all have similar conjugations. Yo tengo una casa. No tengas mierdo.

Note the relationship with 'tain in English words: attain, contain, detain, entertain, mantain, obtain, pertain, retain, sustain.


  • detener: to detain, to arrest, stop. La policía detuvo a once personas. (The police arrested eleven people.)
  • abstener, abstenerse: to abstain, to abstain. Mi padre tiene que abstenerse del alcohol. (My father has to abstain from alcohol.)
  • atenerse: to observe, to abide by, to heed. Es importante que nos atenemos la ley. (It is important that we obey the law.)
  • contener: to contain. La jarra contiene dos litros. (The jug contains two liters.)
  • entretener: to distract, to entertain, to delay, to maintain. Se entretuvieron buscando un coche. (They got distracted looking for a car.) No ha entretenido su coche. (He has not maintained his car.) Se entretenía por tocar el piano. (She entertained herself by playing the piano.)
    mantener: to (physically) support, to sustain, to maintain, to remain or keep. Los precios se mantuvieron estables. (Prices remained stable.) Mantenga limpia España. (Keep Spain clean.) Roberto se mantiene con caramelos. (Roberto keeps himself going with candy.) Se ha mantenido como nuevo. (It has been maintained like new.)
  • obtener: to get, to obtain. Obtuve la firma del actor. (I got the actor's signature.)
  • retener: to retain, to hold back, to deduct, to keep. Retenieron el avión presidencial por una deuda. (They held back the presidential plane because of a debt.) Muchas empresas retienen impuestos. (Many businesses deduct taxes.) Retengo en la cabeza todos los lugares que he visto. (I keep in my head every place I have seen.)
  • sostener: to hold up, to defend. Los tres bloques sostienen la casa. (The three blocks hold up the house.) No puedo sostener mi opinión. (I can't defend my position.)
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
July 17th, 2012 at 6:35:37 AM permalink
Thanks as always for the corrections and comments yesterday, but it's a new day.

Fecha: 17-07-12
Palabra: Disparar


In the Mount Whitney thread there is talk about what kind of firearm would be best for shooting bears. In that spirit, today's SWD is disparar, which seems to primarily mean to shoot or fire.

The question for the advanced readers is to comment on the relationship between parar, which means to stop, and disparar, which perhaps could be interpreted as stopping somebody or something by shooting it.

Ejemplo time.

trató de disparar el oso con mi rifle de 22 calibre, pero sólo lo hizo más enfadado. = I tried to shoot the bear with my 22 caliber rifle, but it only made him more angry.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Alan
Alan
Joined: Jun 14, 2011
  • Threads: 17
  • Posts: 582
July 17th, 2012 at 6:48:21 AM permalink
Wiz,

Here's my co-workers description(she's Mexican).

Disparar=which as you say is to shoot, not necessarily shooting somebody or stopping something by shooting it. Just shoot in general. She even made a gun shape with her hand and said bang!
Parar=which again, as you say is to stop, as in go up three streets, stop(parar) and turn right.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
July 17th, 2012 at 8:17:48 AM permalink
Quote: Alan

Disparar=which as you say is to shoot, not necessarily shooting somebody or stopping something by shooting it. Just shoot in general. She even made a gun shape with her hand and said bang!
Parar=which again, as you say is to stop, as in go up three streets, stop(parar) and turn right.



Thanks Alan to you and your co-worker. I assume that both "shoot" and disparar don't necessarily mean to shoot a gun, but shoot anything, like a rubber band.

Regarding parar, as I recall the stop signs in Argentina said para, but in Mexico they also alto, but I could have that backwards.

Trivialidades time!

A big off topic, but on the topic of stop signs, where is the only place (as far as I know) in French-speaking Quebec to use stop signs in English, and why?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
July 17th, 2012 at 8:43:32 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The question for the advanced readers is to comment on the relationship between parar, which means to stop, and disparar, which perhaps could be interpreted as stopping somebody or something by shooting it.



Not as far as I know.

Quote:

trató de disparar el oso con mi rifle de 22 calibre, pero sólo lo hizo más enfadado. = I tried to shoot the bear with my 22 caliber rifle, but it only made him more angry.



"He/She/It tried to shoot to the bear with my rifle of 22 caliber, but he/she/it only made it more angry."

"TratÉ de dispararle AL oso con mi rifle calibre 22, pero ESTO solo lo hizo enojar mas."

BTW I think it's hard to hurt a fly with a .22, but I have a feeling I may be exaggerating a bit ;)

I'll try to foresall a question. If you say "traté de disparar al oso," it means you tried to shoot the bear as if it were amunition. That is you tried to put it in a gun and shoot it, which is utterly ridiculous. Therefore "traté de dispararLE AL oso," meaning you tried to shoot something, pressumably a bullet, at the bear.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
July 17th, 2012 at 10:05:45 AM permalink
Quote: Alan

Wiz,

Here's my co-workers description(she's Mexican).

Disparar=which as you say is to shoot, not necessarily shooting somebody or stopping something by shooting it. Just shoot in general. She even made a gun shape with her hand and said bang!
Parar=which again, as you say is to stop, as in go up three streets, stop(parar) and turn right.




Alto from Latin means "high", but it is also a word derived from the German "halt". So on a STOP sign it obviously means "halt", but in most cases it means "tall" or "high".

Set aside the Latin roots for now of "parar" and "disparar".

I am confused between the word tirar and disparar. The dictionary lists "tirar" as having multiple meanings including "to throw", "to throw out ", "to knock over", "to manage", "to fornicate (in Spain)", but it also means "to shoot". In what cases would it be proper to use "tirar" vs "disparar" when talking about shooting a gun?

It's fairly common to see the word indicating what to do with trash, but it is also used in talking about guns.
Alan
Alan
Joined: Jun 14, 2011
  • Threads: 17
  • Posts: 582
July 17th, 2012 at 10:16:46 AM permalink
Spain's version sure is interesting. Wiktionary isn't as politically correct as you are; they just come and say it(the F-word).

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/tirar
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
July 17th, 2012 at 10:29:59 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Alto from Latin means "high", but it is also a word derived from the German "halt". So on a STOP sign it obviously means "halt", but in most cases it means "tall" or "high".



I never stopped to think about it. I guess I assumed that there was a verb altar that meant stop. That would be high right, there is such a verb, but it means to elevate.

Any takers on my trivia question?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
July 17th, 2012 at 10:40:11 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Alto from Latin means "high", but it is also a word derived from the German "halt". So on a STOP sign it obviously means "halt",



It means "stop." A red traffic light is called "alto," too (the green is known as "siga," wchich literally means "follow").

Quote:

I am confused between the word tirar and disparar. The dictionary lists "tirar" as having multiple meanings including "to throw", "to throw out ", "to knock over", "to manage", "to fornicate (in Spain)", but it also means "to shoot".



"Tirar" also means "to pull." So the action of pulling the trigger which actually shoots the weapon is where "tirar=disparar" comes from.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
July 17th, 2012 at 12:32:34 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A big off topic, but on the topic of stop signs, where is the only place (as far as I know) in French-speaking Quebec to use stop signs in English, and why?





I have read that arrêt is actually "stop" as in a stopping place (like a bus stop), and so it is actually poor French. In France the signs say STOP.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation has decreed that from 1 January 2008 all Air Traffic Controllers and Flight Crew Members engaged in or in contact with international flights must be proficient in the English language as a general spoken medium and not simply have a proficiency in standard ICAO Radio Telephony Phraseology.


So my guess to the answer to your trivia question is the airport. If not, I would guess West Island, Quebec, where English is dominant.


  • Jump to: