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pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 3rd, 2012 at 1:57:45 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

One thing this book did clear up is the difference between lo and le as direct objects. It said le is used only in Spain.



While this statement is correct, emphasis is needed. The pronoun le is used as a direct object only in Spain. It is used as an indirect object everywhere.

I am sorry if I am stating the obvious.
pacomartin
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July 4th, 2012 at 3:33:15 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I've mentioned an Argentine commedy music troupe called Les Luthiers. They do use the word "coraje" for courage often, when called for. But they affect a pompous and quaint style on purpose, it's part of their act. In a scene from "El Adelantado Don Rodrigo Díaz de Carreras, etc, etc...." The narrator says something like:

¡Firme! ¡Firme ante el enemigo!
¡Con coraje, Don Rodrigo!
Y Don Rodrigo firmó la rendición.

That's a pun that can't be easily translated into English.



Looking at a dictionary
Firme - (meaning 1) stand firm (meaning 2) sign something
Coraje - (meaning 1) courage (meaning 2) extreme anger in the sense of a tantrum
Rendición - (meaning business) profit (meaning military) surrender

So the pun is a double entendre on the three words. Read one way the phrase is:
Stand! Stand against the enemy! With courage, Don Rodrige! And Don Rodrgo stood firm and profited.

Sign! Sign with the enemy! With a fit, Don Rodrigo! And Don Rodrgo signed and surrendered.
Nareed
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July 4th, 2012 at 6:52:27 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Rendición - (meaning business) profit (meaning military) surrender



You need someone with a bigger taste for obscurity to use that as profit. The common word is "ganancia." The uncommon word, but far more used than "rendición" is "redito."

Quote:

So the pun is a double entendre on the three words. Read one way the phrase is:



Not quite.

The pun is part of a longer joke. You're led to believe the narrator is urging Rodrigo to stand fast against the enemy, only to learn he was urging him to sign a surrender.

No one would think to even think (yes, you read that right), that Rodrigo stood firm and made a profit.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 4th, 2012 at 8:24:21 AM permalink
Thank you for the help with the direct object question. That helps.

¡Feliz cuatro de Julio, todos!

Fecha: 04-07-12
Palabra: pañuelo


Today's SWD means bandanna/handkerchief. The dictionary says it can also mean scarf, but I thought the word for that was bufanda.

The question for the advanced readers is what is the root meaning of pan. In English "pan" means all, for example pandemic (all people), panacea (all cure), pantheism (all gods). This would seem like a Greek root, and Spanish is more based on Latin. Speaking of pan, how did that come to mean bread in Spanish?

Ejemplo time.

Me gusta mucho este pañuelo, porque Ginger estornudó sobre ella. = I treasure this bandanna because Ginger sneezed on it.
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Nareed
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July 4th, 2012 at 8:33:48 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

¡Feliz cuatro de Julio, todos!



"...A todos!" And lose the comma.

Quote:

Today's SWD means bandanna/handkerchief. The dictionary says it can also mean scarf, but I thought the word for that was bufanda.



It means handkerchief. It can be used as a bandana.

Quote:

The question for the advanced readers is what is the root meaning of pan. In English "pan" means all, for example pandemic (all people), panacea (all cure), pantheism (all gods). This would seem like a Greek root, and Spanish is more based on Latin. Speaking of pan, how did that come to mean bread in Spanish?



Trace down "Pandora."

The examples you used translate to Spanish as Pandemia, Panacea and Panteismo. So it's still current.

I don't know why "pan" is bread, but it's common in Romance languages. In French it's "pain," pronounced "pan." I thik in italian it's "pane." A type of Italian sandwich is called "pannini," too.


Quote:

Me gusta mucho este pañuelo, porque Ginger estornudó sobre ella. = I treasure this bandanna because Ginger sneezed on it.



Gross.

And it's "...sobre EL."
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pacomartin
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July 4th, 2012 at 9:35:42 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The question for the advanced readers is what is the root meaning of pan. In English "pan" means all, for example pandemic (all people), panacea (all cure), pantheism (all gods). This would seem like a Greek root, and Spanish is more based on Latin. Speaking of pan, how did that come to mean bread in Spanish?



The Greek word pantos led to the use of pan- as a Greek prefix meaning all inclusive. Starting in 1846 English copied that usage in political terms. The first one was panslavism. It was followed by panislamic (1881), pan-American (1889), pan-German (1892), pan-African (1900), pan-European (1901), pan-Arabism (1930).

The Latin word is panis which means bread or loaf.

Descendants include:
Aromanian: pãne
Armenian: պան (pan)
Campidanese Sardinian: pani
Catalan: pa
Dalmatian: pun, pen
Esperanto: pano
French: pain
Istriot: pan
Italian: pane
Logudorese Sardinian: pane
Occitan: pan
Papiamentu: pan
Portuguese: pão
Romanian: pâine
Romansch: paun
Sardinian: pani
Sicilian: pani
Spanish: pan

While Spanish is based primarily on Latin, it obviously had other influences as well. Well educated Romans often spoke or read in Greek. Spanish also picked up words from Arabic and other Romance languages (mostly French and Italian ). Clearly Latin American Spanish picked up a lot of vocabulary from native languages (though little or no grammar). Also Latin and Greek are both Indo European, so a lot of their vocabulary came from the same place.
Wizard
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July 4th, 2012 at 9:41:53 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

besides, no one in Mexico says "perro caliente," unless they are trying to make fun of the expression. We say <drumroll> "hot dogs."



On Levantate this morning they were covering the annual Coney Island hot dog eating contest. They translated hot dog as perro caliente.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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July 4th, 2012 at 10:02:23 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

On Levantate this morning they were covering the annual Coney Island hot dog eating contest. They translated hot dog as perro caliente.



Telemundo is not based in Mexico.
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pacomartin
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July 4th, 2012 at 10:11:51 AM permalink
Telemundo covers the burning questions in all of our minds.
¿Crees que Casper Smart, el novio de Jennifer López es verdaderamente gay y está buscando fama y dinero junto a la Diva del Bronx?
A) Es gay y quiere fama
B) Es herterosexual y la quiere de verdad
Wizard
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July 4th, 2012 at 10:56:13 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

¿Crees que Casper Smart, el novio de Jennifer López es verdaderamente gay y está buscando fama y dinero junto a la Diva del Bronx?



You should make that a poll. Between two questions with two possibilites each, shouldn't there be four choices?

It is my understanding that Levantate is based out of the U.S., but wouldn't they favor Mexican Spanish?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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