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Wizard
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Wizard
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July 3rd, 2012 at 6:36:54 AM permalink
Fecha: 03-07-12
Palabra: Halagar


Today's SWD means primarily to flatter.

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast halagar y adular.

Ejemplo time.

Traté de halagar a Ginger, pero todavia ella no me muestra ningún interés. = I tried to flatter Ginger, but she still shows no interest in me.

By the way, how would you say "Flattery will get you nowhere" in Spanish. I wanted to do that as the ejemplo but wasn't sure what word to use for "get" and nothing I tried felt right.
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Nareed
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July 3rd, 2012 at 6:48:32 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast halagar y adular.



Oh, I know this one.

Halagar = To flatter
Adualr = To kiss someone's a**

Clear? ;)

Quote:

Traté de halagar a Ginger, pero todavia ella no me muestra ningún interés. = I tried to flatter Ginger, but she still shows no interest in me.



"..Pero aún así no me muestra ingún interés."


Quote:

By the way, how would you say "Flattery will get you nowhere" in Spanish. I wanted to do that as the ejemplo but wasn't sure what word to use for "get" and nothing I tried felt right.



I don't think there's an equivalent expression, not that I'm familiar with. A straight translation doesn't make much sense.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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July 3rd, 2012 at 6:58:37 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

By the way, how would you say "Flattery will get you nowhere" in Spanish. I wanted to do that as the ejemplo but wasn't sure what word to use for "get" and nothing I tried felt right.



Halagar is Arabic, and Adular is Latin.

Another forum suggests:

Halagar no te llevará a ningún lugar,
pero no dejes que eso te pare.
Nareed
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July 3rd, 2012 at 7:19:15 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Halagar no te llevará a ningún lugar,
pero no dejes que eso te pare.



As I said, you can translate it, but it doesn't make sense. At least not without an explanation.

Take the following:

"A thief who steals from another thief enjoys 100 years of forgiveness."

Now, does that make sense to you? It's a pretty common saying in mexico, but said like that it neither rhymes nor amkes sense. The origional is "Ladrón que roba a ladrón tiene cien años de perdón."

It means
it's no sin to steal from a thief
.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
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July 3rd, 2012 at 7:31:11 AM permalink


So that movie title was actually the first part of an old saying. The English title is given as To Rob a Thief, but it makes more sense if you know it is part of the proverb.
Nareed
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July 3rd, 2012 at 7:45:44 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

So that movie title was actually the first part of an old saying. The English title is given as To Rob a Thief, but it makes more sense if you know it is part of the proverb.



I woudln't know. the last Mexican movie I saw was "Macario" with Ignacio Lopez Tarso.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
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July 3rd, 2012 at 10:24:54 AM permalink
Ignacio Lopez Tarso is still acting at the age of 87. But he was only age 35 when he made Macario.

Demian Bichir got nominated for an Oscar this year. I like Damián Alcázar, myself.

Wizard
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July 3rd, 2012 at 12:48:08 PM permalink
We've touched on this before, but I have never understood when to put the direct object pronoun before the verb and when to tack it onto the end. I'm going through a basic Spanish book and here it what it says, "When the pronoun is the object of an infinitive or of an affirmative command, it follows the verb and is attached to it." It then gives as an example, "El Sr. Adams va a saludarlo."

Okay, the part about the affirmative command I've seen before. However, what does it mean by "an infinitive"? In the example va is not in the infinitive (ir) form.

One thing this book did clear up is the difference between lo and le as direct objects. It said le is used only in Spain.
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Nareed
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July 3rd, 2012 at 1:02:44 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

We've touched on this before, but I have never understood when to put the direct object pronoun before the verb and when to tack it onto the end.



Whenever I read such posts, i amrvel that I apssed Spanish in high school at all :)


Quote:

One thing this book did clear up is the difference between lo and le as direct objects. It said le is used only in Spain.



As far as I know "lo" is third person and "le" (and "te") is second person. First person, not that you asked is "me." IN plural, in order it would be "nos" for first and "los" for the other two.

Assuming we're talking about the same thing at all.

And people ask me why, when I speak and understand it so well, I don't offer English lessons...
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
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July 3rd, 2012 at 1:39:53 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

We've touched on this before, but I have never understood when to put the direct object pronoun before the verb and when to tack it onto the end. I'm going through a basic Spanish book and here it what it says, "When the pronoun is the object of an infinitive or of an affirmative command, it follows the verb and is attached to it." It then gives as an example, "
El Sr. Adams va a saludarlo.
"

Okay, the part about the affirmative command I've seen before. However, what does it mean by "an infinitive"? In the example va is not in the infinitive (ir) form.



The verb 'va' is a conjugated form, but 'saludar' is an infinitive.

There is third case where you tack the direct pronoun at the end, in the case of a gerundio or a '-ndo' version of a verb. This case does not come up as often as the first two, but it is still valid.

To modify the rule a little, you tack the pronoun on the end when the pronoun is the object of an inifintive (when there is only one verb). For instance 'Favor de darme el libro'.

When there are two verbs, one conjugated and one infinitive, you actually have a choice. Either way is correct grammar, but I believe tacking it on the end is most commonly used.

Voy a verlo.
OR:
Lo voy a ver.

So the example given in that text is not the best example since it uses two verbs.

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