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Nareed
Nareed
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June 28th, 2012 at 10:41:07 AM permalink
Looks like someone hasn't posted here in a while. Probably "haciendo corajes" somewhere in the desert...

So, I thought I'd pitch in. Right now I'm in Monterrey, seeing whether I waste a whole day or only half (long story, and this rented PC's keys are so worn down I can't see all the letters...) I saw something that inspired today's word.

28 de Junio de 2012
Palabra: Timo.

Today's word means "to rip-off," as in to perpetrate a fraud or a hoax.

It came to mind because earlier in the day I passed by a pet store with a cute little monkey as mascot/logo, called "La jungla de Timo." I had to stop and make sure. Indeed, that's the store's name. What posseses someone to call his pet store "Rip-off's Jungle"????? Seriously.

The example is left as an exercise for the student.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 28th, 2012 at 11:29:11 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Looks like someone hasn't posted here in a while. Probably "haciendo corajes" somewhere in the desert...



Yes, I was "making courage," but in the mountains. Monday and Tuesday I climbed Mount Baldy and Mount San Jacinto. Maybe not such a big deal for a full-grown man, but my ten-year-old son came along, which I think was very noteworthy. Everyone who we passed seemed very impressed, many asking his age. I may be back now, but dealing with a backlog of work that awaited me.

Two more weeks until Mount Whitney, the highest point in the lower 48 states.

Quote:

The example is left as an exercise for the student.



Seis a cinco 21 es un timo. = Six to five blackjack is a jip.

As I recall from Panama, Argentina, and Uruguay they called blackjack "21." I was really tempted to annoy Nareed by translating it as enchufe negro, but as someone trying to develop a web site about gambling in Spanish, I didn't have the nerve.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 28th, 2012 at 2:22:35 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Yes, I was "making courage," but in the mountains.



I am still confused about the meaning of this phrase. Both parents use it on their youtube video, but the behavior of the children is profoundly different. The second baby, "Joel" seems more in keeping with Nareed's use of the word.



I am not sure what the mother is saying to baby Ian. It sounds like she is trying to persuade him to have a temper tantrum for the camera, but he keeps on smiling and kissing her.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 28th, 2012 at 9:00:07 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Yes, I was "making courage," but in the mountains.



That's not what "hacer corajes" means.

Quote:

Maybe not such a big deal for a full-grown man, but my ten-year-old son came along, which I think was very noteworthy.



Good for him!

Of course, at his wedding you'll have some explaining to do to your daughter in law ;)

Quote:

Seis a cinco 21 es un timo. = Six to five blackjack is a jip.



"El BLACKJACK de seis a cinco es un timo."

I'm to tired to argue the point (I did waste the whole day, not just half).

Oh, and I need to post a long rant about Viva Aerobus, but I'm too tired for that now. For now I'll just say I've awarded it the dubious distinction of having given me two of my four worst ever flights, all in one day. The least of it was that the seats on their planes DO NOT RECLINE. Really, that was the least part of the problem with it.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 29th, 2012 at 10:29:16 AM permalink
Fecha: 29-06-12
Palabra: Lata


The official meaning of lata is can (as in a can of beans) or tin. However, it also is used figuratively as a drag, nuiscance, pain. The expression dar la lata means to annoy. My tutor says the word is never used this way in Peru, but she thinks it is common in Mexican Spanish.

Ejemplo time.

Separar las latas de la basura para reciclarlas es una lata. = Separating the cans from the trash to recycle them is a pain.

In other news regarding Mexican Spanish I have a disagreement my tutor. I said that I noticed that on Spanish television in the U.S. (which I presume leans towards Mexcian Spanish) and Mexican movies men call each other gordo alot. This includes when the person being called gordo isn't the least bit fat. I told my tutor that it was a term of endearment and didn't imply the person was fat. She disagreed saying that the person was probably fat at one point, and lost weight.

I might add that the place we talked about before was Tacos El Gordo and I don't think they were going for a "Fatburger" effect, but that gordo is a familiar and friendly word. Any comments from the advanced readers?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 29th, 2012 at 11:01:35 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

However, it also is used figuratively as a drag, nuiscance, pain. The expression dar la lata means to annoy. My tutor says the word is never used this way in Peru, but she thinks it is common in Mexican Spanish.







In Mexico I saw some "big" guys called "Gordo" who were not obese. Just big.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 29th, 2012 at 11:15:42 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The expression dar la lata means to annoy.



Just "dar lata." There's no LA.

The example was fine.

Quote:

In other news regarding Mexican Spanish I have a disagreement my tutor.



Your tutor's wrong. You're right. End of story.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 30th, 2012 at 2:57:07 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Your tutor's wrong. You're right. End of story.



Thanks, that's what I like to hear.

Fecha: 30-06-12
Palabra: Recatar


Today's SWD primarily means to hide. I can just hear the intermediate readers saying, "Wait a minute, I thought esconder was Spanish for 'hide.'" The difference is that recatar means to hide due to shyness or embarrassment. Esconder is more of the general term, and used much more frequently.

Perhaps you are more likely to see recatar in its past participle form: recatado = shy/modest.

Ejemplo time.

El médico me dijo que desnudarse, pero yo era demasiado recatado. = The doctor told me to disrobe, but I was too shy to.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 30th, 2012 at 3:49:10 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The doctor told me to disrobe, but I was too shy to.


I think the natural adjective to use in this case would be tímido .

Before today women dressed in a manner more modest.
Antes ahora las mujeres vestían de forma más recatada.

I know both words are translated as "shy".

The adjective escondido or "hidden" is very common in Mexico's tourist places when describing a place.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 30th, 2012 at 4:31:47 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks, that's what I like to hear.



So long as you and Paco don't go through every possible phoneme and Latin root trying to figure out an explanation...

Quote:

The difference is that recatar means to hide due to shyness or embarrassment.



Did you find a book entitled "The 10,000 most obscure and least used words in Spanish"? ;)

Quote:

El médico me dijo que desnudarse, pero yo era demasiado recatado. = The doctor told me to disrobe, but I was too shy to.



I've no idea if the sue is right or not. But in the first art you said "The doctor told me that get undressed..." The right way is "El doctor me dijo que ME desnudara...."

At least now I understand why I spent so much time in elementary school conjugating verbs.
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