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Nareed
Nareed
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June 14th, 2012 at 8:50:14 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Ah, the subjunctive. I keep forgetting about that -- not that I ever really knew in the first place.



Let's not engage in Greek til we master Spanish, ok? ;)

Quote:

RE: Sexy

I think I can vouch that the word has made its way into German as well.



This reminds me of the lowest test score I ever saw. I will clarify it wasn't my test. It was an English test at school with a simple fill-in-the-blanks format. This guy left all the blanks unfilled, except one where he wrote "sexy." His score was 0.5 out of 10 (there were twenty blanks to fill).
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Wizard
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June 14th, 2012 at 11:09:31 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

This reminds me of the lowest test score I ever saw. I will clarify it wasn't my test. It was an English test at school with a simple fill-in-the-blanks format. This guy left all the blanks unfilled, except one where he wrote "sexy." His score was 0.5 out of 10 (there were twenty blanks to fill).



That's a good story. I hope his parents got a good laugh, or cry, out of that.

Fecha: 15/06/12
Palabra: despejar


Today's SWD means to clear, as in to clear an area. It should not be confused with vaciar, which means to empty. In the reflexive, despejarse means more like to "clear up." For example, "the weather is clearing up."

No question for the advanced readers today.

Ejemplo time.

A la fiesta, jugué música de Klezmer, pero sólo lo despejó el piso de bailar. = At the party, I played some Klezmer music, but it only cleared the dance floor.

Sorry, but I have no idea how to translate Klezmer into Spanish, but imagine it would be the same. I'm all in favor of starting a special thread about Klezmer music, if anyone has the interest.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 14th, 2012 at 11:37:53 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

This reminds me of the lowest test score I ever saw. I will clarify it wasn't my test. It was an English test at school with a simple fill-in-the-blanks format. This guy left all the blanks unfilled, except one where he wrote "sexy."


My cousin's mother in law is from an inland city in the Dominican Republic and speaks about ten words of English. Her family was taking her to dinner one day in the USA and she got very animated in her discussion with her daughter. Her daughter said she wanted to know why the entire menu was in English except for a single prominent Spanish word.

A big hint is that the common menu word (in the desert section) is in actuality neither Spanish or English:
chocolate
pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 14th, 2012 at 11:54:59 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to clear, as in to clear an area.



I think it means to find the inverse of a function in Mathematics. As in given the first equation, derive the second.
y=sqrt(x^2 + 3)
x=sqrt(y^2 - 3)

Sheldon playing klezmar
Nareed
Nareed
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June 15th, 2012 at 6:57:23 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A la fiesta, jugué música de Klezmer, pero sólo lo despejó el piso de bailar. = At the party, I played some Klezmer music, but it only cleared the dance floor.



"To the party, I toyed Klezmer music, but it only cleared the floor of dance." It's actually fun re-translating in order to keep all errors in :)

"EN la fiesta TOQUÉ música de Klezmer, pero solo despejó la PISTA de bailE."
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Wizard
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June 15th, 2012 at 7:26:06 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Sheldon playing klezmar



That is one of my favorite scenes from the BBT.

Quote: Nareed

"EN la fiesta TOQUÉ música de Klezmer, pero solo despejó la PISTA de bailE."



Perhaps I wasn't clear, but I meant that I played the music on a cadena me música; I didn't actually get out instruments and play. So, would it still be tocar? Also, I thought that pista meant a court, like a basketball court. Yes, dances are often held on them, but what if I meant more like a large room in someone's house where people were dancing? That is what I meant, but admit I didn't make it clear.

Finally, speaking of Klezmer music, one thing led to another in my head, and I got to wondering what does mazel tov mean? Is it more like "congratulations," "good luck," "cheers," or anything else?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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June 15th, 2012 at 7:44:40 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Perhaps I wasn't clear, but I meant that I played the music on a cadena me música; I didn't actually get out instruments and play. So, would it still be tocar?



Yes. Cosnider these words:

Record player = Tocadiscos
Tape palyer= Tocacintas

See?

You could say "pusé música Klezmer..." also. But you do not use "jugar" in connection with playing music, be it actually playing a musical isntrument or just playing it on a device like a radio.

Quote:

Also, I thought that pista meant a court, like a basketball court. Yes, dances are often held on them, but what if I meant more like a large room in someone's house where people were dancing? That is what I meant, but admit I didn't make it clear.



I just work here :) In every case where there's a dance area it's called "pista de baile." I don't know if that would be so at a party at someone's home. More likley it wouldn't be called anything in aprticular or referred to in any way.

Quote:

Finally, speaking of Klezmer music, one thing led to another in my head, and I got to wondering what does mazel tov mean? Is it more like "congratulations," "good luck," "cheers," or anything else?



I think it means something like "good fortune," but I'm not sure. It could mean a general kind of blessing, too. I do know "Tov" is Hebrew for "good," or "well," or perhaps "all right."

Have you tried Wikipedia?
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teddys
teddys
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June 15th, 2012 at 7:51:32 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Sorry, but I have no idea how to translate Klezmer into Spanish, but imagine it would be the same. I'm all in favor of starting a special thread about Klezmer music, if anyone has the interest.

Just curious, what do you have to say about Klezmer? It is an interesting music. I have A LOT of connections to it (but don't play myself). Feel free to start a thread.

Fiddler on the Roof (the song Sheldon plays) is definitively not Klezmer. Here is some real Klezmer. (Actually pretty good).

Quote:

Finally, speaking of Klezmer music, one thing led to another in my head, and I got to wondering what does mazel tov mean? Is it more like "congratulations," "good luck," "cheers," or anything else?

Congratulations only. In other words, post hoc rather than a priori "good luck." Cheers is "L'Chaim (to life)."
"Dice, verily, are armed with goads and driving-hooks, deceiving and tormenting, causing grievous woe." -Rig Veda 10.34.4
pacomartin
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June 15th, 2012 at 9:52:32 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You could say "pusé música Klezmer..." also. But you do not use "jugar" in connection with playing music, be it actually playing a musical isntrument or just playing it on a device like a radio.



It is sometimes helpful to remember that Spanish "jugar" comes from the Latin "jocor" sometimes spelled "iocor" which means "joke, sport, pastime". Importantly the English word joke is a direct descendant. In any case it has nothing to do with music.

In English the word "play" is from Anglo Saxon "plegian" which means "to exercise, frolic, perform music". It is not related to any Latin word, so it has no direct translation. Spanish uses a half a dozen words for when English uses the verb "play".
Wizard
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June 16th, 2012 at 7:54:21 AM permalink
Quote: teddys

Is it more like "congratulations," "good luck," "cheers," or anything else?



Gracias, Teddy. Please come by and visit us in the SWD more often.

Fecha: 16-06-12
Palabra: Naricear


There is no direct English equivalent but today's SWD. However, it is obviously derived from nariz (nose). I may not have this exactly right, but it seems to mean to use your nose to smell something out or, in a figurative sense, to put it into something where is may not belong (as in "Take your nose out of my business.")

Other nose related words are olor (oder), and oler (to smell).

Ejemplo time.

Gilligan va a naricear quién está robando los pasteles de Mary Ann. = Gilligan is going to sniff out who has been stealing Mary Ann's pies.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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