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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 13th, 2012 at 7:29:17 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Did you ever see "Clowckwork Orange"?



Many times, and read the book. One of my favorites. I tend to like science fiction that is dark and edgy, and Clockwork Orange is a good example.

Quote:

I've never heard of chain used that way. I think you may have confused it with CAJA de música.



I can show you a scan of the page of my book that says cadena de música if that will convince you. It is right here in front of me.

Quote:

I don't know what a flapper is, outside of a 1920s party girl. If it's some kind of valve, then "válvula" is ok.



Toilets with a handle still use a chain inside the tank. When you push the handle it pulls a chain, which lifts the flapper valve, which releases water in the tank into the bowl. There is a bobber (note to Bill Gates: add this to word to your spell checker) that closes the flapper when the water reaches a certain level.
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Nareed
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June 13th, 2012 at 7:39:41 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Many times, and read the book. One of my favorites.



I stepped into it, I guess. I don't read books that need a dictionary. That includes "Dune" as well. I mean, asimov, Heinlein, and even Star Trek, manage to explain odd terms in context. Serious authors should be able to as well.

Quote:

I can show you a scan of the page of my book that says cadena de música if that will convince you. It is right here in front of me.



Ok. That just pushes the problem back. The translator or author must have confused the terms. "Cadena" is indeed used in many ways, but most are similar to the word "chain" in english. Like:

Reacción en cadena = chain reaction
Cadena de tiendas = Store chain

Some not. For example, "cadena nacional" means all TV or radio stations and networks in the country all carry the same program. This used to be done with events like the Independence celebration, a weekly one hour radio show (the joke at the time was that it was an energy-saving measure, as everyone turned off their radios at that time), the equivalent to the state of the union speech, etc.

But I guarantee if you say "cadena de música," people will ask what you mean.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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June 13th, 2012 at 7:54:46 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Quote:

Where I encountered the word was in the expression cadena de música, which was a translation of "boom box."


Q How many Motie Engineers does it take to screw-in a light bulb?
A While you were asking the question, she repaired the light bulb and hooked it up to life support, it now also makes julienne fries.




In this advertisement, Cadenas de música seems to refer to both an old style boom box, but also any "stereo system". The definition of "cadena" seems to be more like "network". I should note that the advertisement is from Spain, and not Latin America.

The related verb is: encadenar
  • to chain
  • to bind together, to connect
  • to brace
  • to immobilize

    A female engineer dies young in the middle of her fine work. Unfortunately there is a clerical error, and she finds herself in Hell. After a few weeks, St. Peter is checking through the books and he calls up Satan. "Satan, you know that young engineer was supposed to come to heaven, why didn't you send her up pronto?", Satan replies, "Are you kidding? She's the best thing to happen to hell in centuries. The air conditioning is working again, and the boats crossing the River Styx are not leaking anymore. I'm not sending her anyplace!". St. Peter is angry and tells Satan, "You just can't do that, it's not fair to her. She lived a good life". Satan says, "Well, I am Satan. What did you expect?". Now St. Peter is really steamed. He says to Satan, "So help me God, I'm going to sue?" Satan replies,

    El remate del chiste en español

    ¿Donde se va a encontrar un abogado?
Nareed
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June 13th, 2012 at 8:10:11 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I should note that the advertisement is from Spain, and not Latin America.



Yes, well, that explains it. Spaniards don't speak Spanish. they speak Castillian :)

Quote:

El remate del chiste en español



I don't think that's right. You wrote:

Where is a lawyer going to find himself?
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 13th, 2012 at 9:12:45 AM permalink
Satan dice "Ya tengo todos los abogados."


Quote: Nareed

Spaniards don't speak Spanish. they speak Castillian :)



My new tutor has the same attitude. Many times I've used Spanish words she never heard of and said "That's not a Spanish word." My usual answer is "I can prove to you it is a Spanish word; I think it is an everyday word in Spain." Her reply, "Well, that's Spain." She tones it in a way that she really doesn't care very much how Spanish is spoken there. My Argentine tutor would be horrified.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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June 13th, 2012 at 9:27:02 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Satan dice "Ya tengo todos los abogados."



I already have all the lawyers


Are you sure?


Quote:

My new tutor has the same attitude. Many times I've used Spanish words she never heard of and said "That's not a Spanish word." My usual answer is "I can prove to you it is a Spanish word; I think it is an everyday word in Spain." Her reply, "Well, that's Spain." She tones it in a way that she really doesn't care very much how Spanish is spoken there. My Argentine tutor would be horrified.



My highschool Spanish teacher was rigid about vocabulary and grammar, but he disdained adopting Spaniard-style use of words.

The way to see it is how US English varies from the British variety. Except that for some reason there is more variation in Spanish and less cross-comprehension.

BTW, Spain, like many other European countries, is made up of former states or kingdoms which were either united, absorbed or conquered over time. While most of these shared a langauge to begin with, not all of them did. What we call "Spanish" was originally the language spoken in Castille, therefore it's referred to indistinctly as "Castellano" and "Español."

There are other languages in use in Spain, like Catalonian and Basque.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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June 13th, 2012 at 9:14:54 PM permalink
Fecha: 14-06-12
Palabra: Atragantarse


Today's SWD means to choke. A related word is garanta, which means throat.

The question for the advanced readers is whether atragantarse has any figurative meanings. For example, in English "choke" can also mean to miss an opportunity because you were nervous or under too much pressure. It is commonly used as a sports metaphor.

Ejemplo time.

Mastica bien tus comida para que no te atragantas. = Chew your food well so you don't choke.

In case anyone is thinking I'm confusing the verb tenses; I am trying (probably incorrectly) to use the imperative form of tú of masticar.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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June 13th, 2012 at 10:11:13 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The way to see it is how US English varies from the British variety. Except that for some reason there is more variation in Spanish and less cross-comprehension.

What we call "Spanish" was originally the language spoken in Castille, therefore it's referred to indistinctly as "Castellano" and "Español."



The British colonies did not reach a million people until roughly 1750. They had a huge growth spurt which was tied into the calls for independence. By the time of the first census in 1790 there were almost 4 million people (400% in 40 years). By comparison the population grew 400% in the 100 years of the 20th century. The publication of Samuel Johnson's English dictionary in 1755 did a lot to standardize spelling and grammar of the English language.

Considering both that the Spain had a major settlement in Hispaniola in 1493, and conquered Mexico in 1520, there is quite a lot longer to be divided from the mother country. Plus the American Revolution was almost a spat compared to the wars of independence in Latin America. Combined with English dominance of world politics in the 19th century and the continued cultural exchange between the USA and Britain, it is no wonder that the two dialects are fairly comprehensible to one another.

The Real Academia Española was formed in 1713, but by that point the New World versions of Spanish had over 2 centuries to diverge from the European version.
Nareed
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June 14th, 2012 at 6:53:48 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to choke. A related word is garanta, which means throat.



garGanta

Quote:

The question for the advanced readers is whether atragantarse has any figurative meanings.



No.

Quote:

Mastica bien tus comida para que no te atragantas. = Chew your food well so you don't choke.



"Chew your foods well so you don't choke"

"Mastica bien tu comida para que no te atragentEs"
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Wizard
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June 14th, 2012 at 7:52:30 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

atragentEs



Ah, the subjunctive. I keep forgetting about that -- not that I ever really knew in the first place.

RE: Sexy

Quote: Nareed

I think that one's the same in every language.



I think I can vouch that the word has made its way into German as well.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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