Thread Rating:

pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 9th, 2012 at 8:16:40 AM permalink
It is a very familiar word when you drive in Mexico.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 9th, 2012 at 9:49:15 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Para manejarse demasiado rapido, se pusieron topes para limitar la velocidad en la calle. = To control speeding, they put speed bumps on the street.

I searched for a verb that means "to go fast" like the English "speed" but couldn't find one.



There isn't one. However, your example says "For driving itself too fast...," or "In order to drive itself too fast..." Which would mean speed bumps were placed on the street to allow for speeding, not to prevent it.

Try this:

"Debido a que se manejaba demasiado rápido, se pusieron topes en la calle." or "Para controlar la velocidad, se pusieron topes en la calle."

There's no need to indicate the speed bumps are meant to limit speeding, as that is their one and only function (assuming the increase in traffic along with higher air pollution are indeed side effects and not the main goal)
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 10th, 2012 at 1:47:40 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I searched for a verb that means "to go fast" like the English "speed" but couldn't find one.



multar ="to fine"
-aron suffix is plural 3rd person past preterite

Lo multaron por exceso de velocidad.

They fined me for excess velocity. (literal translation)
They fined me for speeding. (closer to vernacular)
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
June 11th, 2012 at 7:31:02 AM permalink
Fecha: 11-06-12
Palabra: Topar


Today's SWD means to run into. As far as I know, there is no equivalent single word in English.

A similar word is encontrar, which means to encounter. What is the difference?, you may be wondering. I think that topar implies more of an accidental encounter. Examples I've seen usually show topar having a negative outcome. Encontrar usually seems to be used in situations where the encounter was beneficial somehow. I'll leave it to the advanced readers to clean up after my mess and explain the real difference.

I might add that according to Reverso, topar can also mean to make a bet in some Spanish-speaking countries, including Mexico.

The question for the advanced readers is whether there is a connection between topar, and our last SWD tope?

Ejemplo time.

Me topado con una puta en el casino. = I ran into a hooker in the casino.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 11th, 2012 at 7:46:02 AM permalink
The DRAE says that the verb is derived from the similar sounding "choque" which means "bump". There is a modern dance style called the choque.

DRAE says the colloquial meaning of taking a bet is used in Peru.

Yes, 'tope' and 'topar' are related noun and verb.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 11th, 2012 at 7:51:11 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means to run into. As far as I know, there is no equivalent single word in English.



You know there's no Spanish word for "meet"?

Quote:

A similar word is encontrar, which means to encounter.



"Encontrar" also means "to find."


Quote:

Examples I've seen usually show topar having a negative outcome. Encontrar usually seems to be used in situations where the encounter was beneficial somehow. I'll leave it to the advanced readers to clean up after my mess and explain the real difference.



There's a difference in usage. You're likely to encounter "topar" when being given directions. A popular one is "Sigues derecho hasta topar con pared y das vuelta a la derecha." More or less this means "Go straight untilt he street ends and then turn right." This applies to streets that and in an intersection with another street, or two streets. In fact, that's how you find my house :)

Quote:

I might add that according to Reverso, topar can also mean to make a bet in some Spanish-speaking countries, including Mexico.



I've never heard it used that way.

Quote:

Me topado con una puta en el casino. = I ran into a hooker in the casino.



"Me HE Toapdo con...." or "Me topÉ con..."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
June 11th, 2012 at 3:22:32 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

A popular one is "Sigues derecho hasta topar con pared y das vuelta a la derecha." More or less this means "Go straight untilt he street ends and then turn right." This applies to streets that and in an intersection with another street, or two streets. In fact, that's how you find my house :)



You mention pared but not "wall" in the English. If you told me that in Spanish I would keep looking for the wall. What if the street came to the end at a T intersection and what was in front of you was a vacant lot or a shrine to the Virgin Guadalupe?

The way I would say it in English is "Go straight until the end of the street, and then turn right."
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 11th, 2012 at 3:32:56 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

You mention pared but not "wall" in the English.



Deliberately, too.

Quote:

If you told me that in Spanish I would keep looking for the wall. What if the street came to the end at a T intersection and what was in front of you was a vacant lot or a shrine to the Virgin Guadalupe?



A shrine or any other kind of buidling has walls, so they count as a wall. I'm less certain about a vacant lot, but you have to allow for cultural differences. I won't justify this by saying that most vacant lots have either a brick fence (a wall) or a wire fence on the side facing the street. Oh, if you encouter a cliff side at the end of a street, that's also a wall.

Which reminds me, don't ever try to drive in any of Mexico's City's suburbs without a pritned map. Not a GPS, etiher, though you can use one, but a detailed printed map. You'd be surprised, too, how many streets lack any name signs.

Quote:

The way I would say it in English is "Go straight until the end of the street, and then turn right."



Going from past experience, I should think you'd say "Head east until the end of the street and then turn right." Unless you ended with, "then turn north."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23424
June 11th, 2012 at 6:25:26 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

A shrine or any other kind of buidling has walls, so they count as a wall. I'm less certain about a vacant lot, but you have to allow for cultural differences. I won't justify this by saying that most vacant lots have either a brick fence (a wall) or a wire fence on the side facing the street. Oh, if you encouter a cliff side at the end of a street, that's also a wall.



I'm sure land in Mexico City is valuable and there is seldom a totally vacant lot. However, in San Felipe you do see that. I think developers overestimated its potential for expansion so you see roads that lead to nowhere or housing developments that never got past the point of flagging where where each individual lot is. There are many miles of these roads without a soul, or a wall, to be found.

To change the topic, I enjoy reading the Spanish version of Venetian company newsletters. I'd be interested in comments on these translations from the English:

cocktail server = coctelera
sexy = sexy

I tend to think these translations would annoy my former tutor. Aren't there pure Spanish words for these things, or did English take from Spanish?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 11th, 2012 at 6:59:15 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

To change the topic, I enjoy reading the Spanish version of Venetian company newsletters. I'd be interested in comments on these translations from the English:
cocktail server = coctelera
sexy = sexy

I tend to think these translations would annoy my former tutor. Aren't there pure Spanish words for these things, or did English take from Spanish?



In the second case there is a Latin noun "sexus". The English and Spanish adjectives are the same, "sexy", but the Spanish noun would be "sexo".

In the first case, the word cocktail is only about 200 years old, and comes from French coquetier or "egg-cup". I guess both the English and Spanish words come from the French.

I thought the word coctelera referred to the equipment, and not the person.

  • Jump to: