Thread Rating:

pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 7th, 2012 at 10:33:26 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The "ir" in the first sentence is redundant, since you arleady covered the action with "fue."



Would it be more correct to put everything in the preterite?
Ginger fue a la laguna y se bañó en desnuda.

My aunt, who is a bit of a Spanish scholar, suggested the parallel edition of short stories. As these stories are written in Spanish and translated into English, it would avoid the discussion of the proper Spanish word to translate the English. The book is also inexpensive so anyone who is interested can purchase an edition.
Penguin books
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 7th, 2012 at 11:35:23 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Would it be more correct to put everything in the preterite?
Ginger fue a la laguna y se bañó en desnuda.



You said "Ginger went to the lagoon and bathed in the naked."

Here's what you want: Ginger went skinny-dipping in the lagoon = Ginger fue a la laguna a nadar desnuda.

Bañar=To bathe
Nadar=To swim

The problem is that "bañar" can also mean to frolick in the water, or to walk by the beach with water up to your knees, or things like that. A swimsuit in Spanish is "traje de baño." This perists by sheer force of habit, because the mental image is of a suit one wears specifically for the bathroom ro the tub! Some people lately use "traje de natación," which would translate as "swimming suit," especially in news reports. But that's longer, and longer expressions tend to give way to shorter ones (ie car rather than automobile, TV rather than television, phone rather than telephone, fridge, rather than refrigerator, etc).
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
June 7th, 2012 at 4:04:10 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

My aunt, who is a bit of a Spanish scholar, suggested the parallel edition of short stories. As these stories are written in Spanish and translated into English, it would avoid the discussion of the proper Spanish word to translate the English. The book is also inexpensive so anyone who is interested can purchase an edition.



You have a point that it may be better to read something where the original is in Spanish, and then consult the English when I need help. However, one can still run into the same problems. For example, what if I saw the expression todo el mundo and didn't know what mundo meant. If I see "everybody" in the English then I might assume that mundo means "people" when it actually means "world."

I'm not saying your idea doesn't have merit, but that particular books seems to be translations of classic Spanish literature. That is not only going to be too difficult for me, but probably boring. I need something both enjoyable and easy to spend time with it. I don't need to learn Spanish and do so only because I enjoy it. Take that away and I'll quit in a plis plas.

When I was in Argentina I purchased some Mafalda books, which are original Spanish, but I haven't looked at them yet.


Image source: www.mafalda.net
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 7th, 2012 at 4:11:31 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'm not saying your idea doesn't have merit, but that particular books seems to be translations of classic Spanish literature. That is not only going to be too difficult for me, but probably boring. I need something both enjoyable and easy to spend time with it.



I think I told you I was impressed with your grasp of Spanish. As far as reading goes, you're doing very well so far. Your problem now, as I see it, lies with articulation. That gets better with practice, and in time it will help to read something a bit more complex than what you do now. But for now you're doing well, so why not keep at it? "If it ain't broke, don't fix it" and all that.

Quote:

When I was in Argentina I purchased some Mafalda books, which are original Spanish, but I haven't looked at them yet.



Oh, yeah, you did mention them and I forgot about them when we met. If anything gives you trouble there, it will be the 70s era politics which get a reference from time to time.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 7th, 2012 at 6:24:04 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'm not saying your idea doesn't have merit, but that particular books seems to be translations of classic Spanish literature. That is not only going to be too difficult for me, but probably boring. I need something both enjoyable and easy to spend time with it. I don't need to learn Spanish and do so only because I enjoy it. Take that away and I'll quit in a plis plas.



I asked her for the best idea in non-classical literature, and she said there are a range of short stories, many of them modern. Many of the classical books are on the internet. The problem is that very few contemporary Spanish books are translated into English.

Nobel prize winning writers are usually translated.

Mafalda cartoons are available on youtube, but many of them have minimal dialogue. Some are more talkative.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 7th, 2012 at 7:05:57 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Mafalda cartoons are available on youtube, but many of them have minimal dialogue. Some are more talkative.



There was a Mafalda movie back in the 80s. Because animation is seen as a children's medium, it left out the bits having more to do with society and politics. The books are far superior. In fact, all of Quino's work from that era is rather good. A lot of his one-off cartoons, and he has several such books, have no dialogue at all.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
June 7th, 2012 at 11:11:26 PM permalink
Thanks Nareed on the kind words and Paco for the suggestions on Spanish books. I have a pile of Spanish books yet to go through, so for now I'd prefer to work through those. My method has its flaws, but I'm going to stick with it for now.

Fecha: 08-06-12
Palabra: epistolar


Today's SWD means epistolary. For those who don't know what epistolary means (I just found out myself) it means the exchange of letters. In other words, epistolar means writing letters back and forth. That may not happen much these days with Email and forums (ahem) but it used to be quite common before the Internet.

Ejemplo time.

Para mi clase de Español, debo que epistolar con una otra estudiante de Madrid. = For my Spanish class I have to exchange letters with another student from Madrid.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
Joined: Nov 11, 2009
  • Threads: 373
  • Posts: 11413
June 8th, 2012 at 6:41:17 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks Nareed on the kind words and Paco for the suggestions on Spanish books.



You're welcome.

Quote:

Palabra: epistolar



Despite appearances, the word is an adjective rather than a verb. It means "related or belonging to a letter."

It's not a common word at all, yet I'd say almost all Mexican with a highschool education know it, because in highschool as aprt of Mexican history we read something called "La Epístola de Melchor Ocampo." I've no memory of what that is, but I recall the name and the meaning of the word "epístola." To the teen mind, it's a pun mine.

Quote:

Para mi clase de Español, debo que epistolar con una otra estudiante de Madrid. = For my Spanish class I have to exchange letters with another student from Madrid.



"... debo DE..." and "...una estudiante..." or "...otra estudiante..."

But of course an adjective doens't follow. It's an understandable mistake, given that the word looks like a verb. So to trasnalte the English: "Para mi clase de español, debo intercambair cartas con una estudiante de Madrid."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
Joined: Jan 14, 2010
  • Threads: 649
  • Posts: 7895
June 9th, 2012 at 7:29:00 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Quote:

Palabra: epistolar


Despite appearances, the word is an adjective rather than a verb. It means "related or belonging to a letter." It's not a common word at all, yet I'd say almost all Mexican with a highschool education know it, because in highschool as aprt of Mexican history we read something called "La Epístola de Melchor Ocampo." I've no memory of what that is, but I recall the name and the meaning of the word "epístola."



La epistola de Melchor Ocampo is about marriage, and is part of a traditional marriage ceremony. Michoacán de Ocampo is an older name for the state of Michoacán.

While the DRAE says that epistolar is an adjective, there are some documents that say it can also be used as a verb. Needless to say that is an even more obscure use of an already obscure word.

ἐπιστολή in Greek (Transliteration epistolē) is usually only used in North America with reference to the bible. Even in King James version it is often simply translated as "letter". I tend to think of it as an "open letter" written for posterity rather than just for immediate usage.
Wizard
Administrator
Wizard
Joined: Oct 14, 2009
  • Threads: 1390
  • Posts: 23442
June 9th, 2012 at 8:11:17 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

La epistola de Melchor Ocampo is about marriage, and is part of a traditional marriage ceremony.



That would seem to imply that espitsolar can be a verb, with espistola the noun form. However, who cares. After this I'll probably never see the word again in my life.

Fecha: 08-06-12
Palabra: tope


Today's SWD has two primary meanings:

(1) The maximum or limit.
(2) A bump. In particular a physical one that serves as a barrier or impediment. For a bump on the head I think you would use chichón.

Ejemplo time.

Para manejarse demasiado rapido, se pusieron topes para limitar la velocidad en la calle. = To control speeding, they put speed bumps on the street.

I searched for a verb that means "to go fast" like the English "speed" but couldn't find one.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

  • Jump to: