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Wizard
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Wizard
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May 28th, 2012 at 6:43:56 AM permalink
Fecha: 28-05-12
Palabra: Apuro


Today's SWD means a predicament or a tight spot. Other meanings include embarrassment or a hurry.

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast apuro y aprieto.

Ejemplo time.

Bueno, eso es otro buen apuro me has metido en. = Well, that is another fine predicament you've put me in.
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Nareed
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May 28th, 2012 at 6:52:45 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast apuro y aprieto.



"Aprieto" means something like "being in a tight spot." I mean this in a literal sense, though not litereally, as "apretar" means "to tighten," or "to pinch." As in for example "Aprieta la tuerca" = "Tighten the bolt." "Estos zapatos me aprietan" = "These shoes pinch me."

"Apuro" denotes hurry, and is related to "apurar," meaning "to hurry." It does mean a rpedicament, but usually one that needs to be solved quickly.


Quote:

Bueno, eso es otro buen apuro me has metido en. = Well, that is another fine predicament you've put me in.



"... otro buen apuro EN EL QUE me has metido."

I know the rule is obsolete in English, but in Spanish you do not end sentences in a prepostion because then they don't make sense.
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pacomartin
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May 28th, 2012 at 8:03:39 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I know the rule is obsolete in English, but in Spanish you do not end sentences in a prepostion because then they don't make sense.



Your rule is one of the top 10 Grammatical Mistakes You Can Avoid in this article.

BTW, the fact that you "can't end a sentence with a preposition" (in English) is a widely quoted mythical rule. The actual rule is that "you should never end a setence with a preposition if it is not needed" (in English).

If you didn't recognize it, the Wizard was copying a famous Oliver and Hardy movie catchphrase.
Well, here's another nice mess you've gotten me into!
I feel stupid saying that since you seem to know American pop culture as well as anyone.
Nareed
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May 28th, 2012 at 8:13:10 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

If you didn't recognize it, the Wizard was copying a famous Oliver and Hardy movie catchphrase.
Well, here's another nice mess you've gotten me into!
I feel stupid saying that since you seem to know American pop culture as well as anyone.



I actually thought it was Gilligan's Island, becasue that's a safe assumption to make with the Wizard, and because Gilligan's job was to mess things up :)

But, yes, I recall such lines from Oliver and Hardy. I've seen some of their movies, both silent and talkies. In fact they were quite well-known in Mexico in the 70s. Their movies, especially the silent ones, were shown often on weekend afternoons. Locally they're known as "El Gordo El Flaco."
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Wizard
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May 28th, 2012 at 8:36:46 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Your rule is one of the top 10 Grammatical Mistakes You Can Avoid in this article.



Quote: 10 Grammatical Mistakes You Can Avoid

Using possessive adjectives when referring to body parts and articles of clothing. In English, we usually refer to a person's body parts or clothing using possessive adjectives. But in Spanish, the definite article (el or la) is used when the person the body part or item belongs to is obvious. Correct: ¡Abre los ojos! (Open your eyes!) El hombre se puso la camisa. (The man put on his shirt.)

-- link

Quote: wizard

El león le dijo, "Por favor tome la astilla de la pata." = The lion said, "Please take the splinter out of my paw."

-- SWD Oct 22, 2011

Quote: Nareed

The lion would say "Por favor SACA la astilla de MI pata."



I hate to beat a dead horse, but with all due respect, but I've always read that body parts are never possessive in Spanish, and Paco's article is yet another source. So I still say that it should be la pata.
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pacomartin
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May 28th, 2012 at 9:00:28 AM permalink
Quote: NowTheSerpent

However, Latin gustare, meaning "taste", "sample", or "enjoy", was conjugated gusto, for "I like", instead of as *mihi or me gustat*.



This discrepancy has been discussed before. Dictionaries fully conjugate the verb in all persons:
English conjugation of disgust
Spanish conjugation of gustar

However, normal Spanish conversation never uses anything but 3rd person for "gustar", and normal English conversation only uses 3rd person for "disgust". Since English doesn't have singular and plural nouns, there is no issue about which ending to use.

As my only Latin class was 40 years ago, I don't remember how "gustare, gusto, or gustus" are used in Latin.
Nareed
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May 28th, 2012 at 9:27:57 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I hate to beat a dead horse, but with all due respect, but I've always read that body parts are never possessive in Spanish, and Paco's article is yet another source. So I still say that it should be la pata.



And I hate to repeat myself, but that's not how the language is used. Not consistently, at any rate. Take these two examples:

Me duele LA cabeza = I have a headache or My head hurts.

Me duele todo MI hermoso cuerpo = I hurt all voer my beautiful body (this is kind of a joke)
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Wizard
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May 28th, 2012 at 9:55:28 AM permalink
Okay, I'll let Nareed have the last word on the possessive body parts argument, without admitting defeat.

Let me change the topic by asking how to translate this sentence I came across.

Papá cortó mis intntos en seco.

The way I would literally translate that is "Father cut my intentions dry."

In English one can stop things "cold," meaning it is done quickly and without hesitation. In Spanish is "dry" used instead of "cold"?
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Nareed
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May 28th, 2012 at 11:05:55 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Okay, I'll let Nareed have the last word on the possessive body parts argument, without admitting defeat.



Somehow this doesn't feel like a victory...

Quote:

Papá cortó mis intntos en seco.

The way I would literally translate that is "Father cut my intentions dry."



IntEntos.

Quote:

In English one can stop things "cold," meaning it is done quickly and without hesitation. In Spanish is "dry" used instead of "cold"?



In some case it is. If you stop suddenly while driving, for instance to avoid hitting an obstacle in the road, you could say "Tuve que parar en seco." But you can't generalize too much.
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Wizard
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May 28th, 2012 at 11:35:04 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Somehow this doesn't feel like a victory...



Maybe this will help. I was just chatting with a Speaking-speaking nanny I sometimes see at the park by my house. She is always happy to help me with my Spanish. So I asked her if body parts can be possessive in Spanish. In particular in my example if it would be mi pata o la pata. She said either would be acceptable.

Quote:

In some case it is. If you stop suddenly while driving, for instance to avoid hitting an obstacle in the road, you could say "Tuve que parar en seco." But you can't generalize too much.



Thanks. Can you comment on where this figure of speech comes from?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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