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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 23rd, 2012 at 10:35:13 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I might get them backwards,



You did get them backwards, but your argument sounded very convincing.

"Presumptive" means "speculative", and "apparent" means "obvious or visible". Charles is the "heir apparent" because he can only be removed as heir by his own death. His mother was the "heir presumptive" in 1952 because she could be removed as heir by the unlikely event of her middle aged parents having a male child.

The change in the law to absolute primogeniture was agreed to in principal, but not all the legal work has been done. Five other monarchies in Europe have absolute primogeniture (Denmark, Sweden , Norway, Belgium, and Luxembourg).

La monarquía española no tiene la primogenitura absoluta. Los hombres tienen preferencia. The Japanese monarchy is male only which caused a near crisis when no male heir had been born into the Imperial Family in nearly 41 years. Princess Akishino finally had a healthy baby boy 5 days before her 40th birthday after being married for 16 years. She nearly had a nervous breakdown trying to conceive a boy.

Another change in Britain is that you can remain in the line of succession if you marry a Catholic, although if you yourself convert to Catholicism you are out of the line. The monarch in the UK is also head of the Anglican church. The current rule change is not retroactive to past generations, so Princess Anne is still below her two much younger brothers. It is not clear if the marriage rule is retroactive. Prince Michael (the queen's cousin) married a Catholic, but never converted himself. He has been out of the line of succession since his marriage in the late 1970's. Prince Michael's daughter in law is an actress and plays the British girlfriend to Ashton Kutcher on 2.5 Men.

Baile, Perro!
Nareed
Nareed
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May 24th, 2012 at 5:34:21 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hmmmm. First, why isn't at least las, because I'm referring to more than one person.



No more than you would say "I like old peopleS" in English. People=Gente is a singular noun that refers to many individuals.

Quote:

Second, I'm not just referring to women, but all people, so shouldn't I use the masculine article?



No. "Gente" is a feminine noun. "La gente vieja" means "old people," and includes all old people.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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May 24th, 2012 at 6:16:41 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

No. "Gente" is a feminine noun. "La gente vieja" means "old people," and includes all old people.



Okay, I can buy that gente is singular. However, I've always thought of Spanish as being a male-dominant language. If you address a crowd of 1,000 women and one man then you have to use ellos, out of respect for the one man. So WHY is gente feminine?
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Nareed
Nareed
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May 24th, 2012 at 6:24:58 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Okay, I can buy that gente is singular. However, I've always thought of Spanish as being a male-dominant language. If you address a crowd of 1,000 women and one man then you have to use ellos, out of respect for the one man.



All this is so.

Quote:

So WHY is gente feminine?



Possibly because it ends in an "e".

You can use feminine pronouns and adjectives to refer to a man when you use a feminine noun to do so. For example:

José es unA malA persona

Pablo es buenA gente (equivalent to saying in English "he's good people")

Andrés es una de las peores mentes del planeta.
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 24th, 2012 at 8:20:35 AM permalink
Modern family days a telenovela. A lot is in spanish with no subtitles.
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 24th, 2012 at 10:17:32 PM permalink
Fecha: 25-05-12
Palabra: Frenar


Today's SWD means to slow down, hold back, or specifically to hit the brakes on a car. A related word is freno which means a break, as in the kind that stops your car. In east Las Vegas you sometimes see auto repair shops that mention they do frenos.

Ejemplo time.

Manejo con un pie en el pedel de freno y el otro en el pedal de nafta. = I drive with one foot on the brakes and one on the gas.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 25th, 2012 at 5:18:10 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Manejo con un pie en el pedel de freno y el otro en el pedal de nafta. = I drive with one foot on the brakes and one on the gas.



I have heard "nafta" used "for "gasolina" but I've no idea where that would be.

In any case, no one in Mexico refers to the pedals in a car like that, any more than you do in English. So: "Manejo con un pie en el freno y el otro en el acelerador."
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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 25th, 2012 at 5:57:47 AM permalink
In parts of the English speaking world gasoline is referred to as "petrol", short for "petroleum".


"nafta" was SWD 17 June 2011
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 25th, 2012 at 6:51:26 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I have heard "nafta" used "for "gasolina" but I've no idea where that would be.



Any dictionary, including the one you gave me, should have nafta meaning gasoline. From my point of view, I don't know what words are used in everyday speech and which are archaic.

So, now we've covered the brake and gas pedal. Now we just need the clutch (embrague).
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 25th, 2012 at 7:17:15 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Any dictionary, including the one you gave me, should have nafta meaning gasoline. From my point of view, I don't know what words are used in everyday speech and which are archaic.



I've never once heard anyone in Mexico use "nafta" for "gasoline." It's not so much archaic as used elsewhere, possibly South America.

Quote:

So, now we've covered the brake and gas pedal. Now we just need the clutch (embrague).



Actually in Mexico we use the word "clutch."
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