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pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 22nd, 2012 at 10:14:26 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast apacible and tranquilo.

Today is my birthday so I get to torture all of you with my horrible Spanish a little extra.



I think a better assignment is contrast the verbs "apaciguar" & "pacificar" and "pacificarse" & "apaciguarse" . The reflexive version of the verbs means to calm yourself down. I honestly don't know the difference, because they both seem to be the same verb meaning "to pacify".

apacible can mean: calm, affable, meek, gentle, inoffensive
tranquilo can mean: calm, quiet, peaceful, relaxed, untroubled

I hope you have an untroubled birthday with no financial or other concerns.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 23rd, 2012 at 5:52:24 AM permalink
¡Feliz cumpleaños!

Quote:

Today's SWD means to clam down. Here are some related words:



I think the English word "appeasement" is also related at the root.

Quote:

The assignment for the advanced readers is to compare and contrast apacible and tranquilo.



"Apacible" means a person who is usually calm, but also not very outspoken or, for lack of a better word, proactive (is that even a word?). "Tranquilo" is used to describe a temporary state. Say an excitable person can be calm sometimes.

Quote:

Cosas son differente hoy = Things are different today
Oigo todas las madres dice = I hear every mother say
Madre necesita algo hoy para apaciguarla = Mother needs something to calm her down
y aunque ella no está enfermo de verdad = And thought she's not really ill
Hay una poca píldora amarilla = There's a little yellow pill
Se va corriendo para el refugio de la ayudante pequeño de su madre. = She goes running for the shelter of her mother's little helper.



"LAS cosas..."
"Oigo A todas las madres DECIR"
"MAMA necesita..."
"...no está enfermA..."
"Hay una PEQUEÑA píldora amarilla."
"...el refugio DEL pequeño ayudante..."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 23rd, 2012 at 7:10:26 AM permalink
Mother's little helper in Spanish
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 23rd, 2012 at 7:33:41 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Mother's little helper in Spanish



It seems there are several covers of that on YouTube. I also found the lyrics in Spanish. Here is just the part I tried to translate.

Hoy los chicos son distinos
Se lo oigo decir a cada madre
hoy una madre necesita also que las tranquilice
y aunque realmente no esté enferma
hay una pequeña pildora amarilla.
Ella corre al refugiado de la pequeña ayuda para madres.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 23rd, 2012 at 2:03:12 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Here is just the part I tried to translate.

Hoy los chicos son distinos
Se lo oigo decir a cada madre
hoy una madre necesita also que las tranquilice
y aunque realmente no esté enferma
hay una pequeña pildora amarilla.
Ella corre al refugiado de la pequeña ayuda para madres.



You did much better than that.

Third line says "These days a mother needs something to calm them down" (remember our little chat about the use of "they/their/them" for a single person?)

The last line makes no sense at all. It says, more or less, "she runs to the refugee of the mother's little help." (no typos between the quote signs).
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 23rd, 2012 at 9:11:28 PM permalink
Fecha: 24-05-12
Palabra: Heredar


Today's SWD means to inherit. This seems like a nice clean word with no homonyms or synonyms, and a fairly close cognate to English. All Spanish words should be this easy. A related word is herencia , which means inheritance.

A question for the advanced readers is what does the root "here" mean in both the Spanish heredar and English inherit?

Ejemplo time.

Me gustan los gentes viejos. Heredamos el dinero de ellos cuando mueren. = I like old people. We inherit money from them when they die.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
Nareed
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May 23rd, 2012 at 9:22:50 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is what does the root "here" mean in both the Spanish heredar and English inherit?



Ask Paco.

Quote:

Me gustan los gentes viejos. Heredamos el dinero de ellos cuando mueren. = I like old people. We inherit money from them when they die.



Close.

"...LA gente vieja..."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 23rd, 2012 at 9:26:33 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"...LA gente vieja..."



Hmmmm. First, why isn't at least las, because I'm referring to more than one person. Second, I'm not just referring to women, but all people, so shouldn't I use the masculine article?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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May 23rd, 2012 at 9:26:35 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is what does the root "here" mean in both the Spanish heredar and English inherit?


The word "heres" is Latin for "heir". English picked it up from Old French in the Middle Ages.

Quiz: There are two kinds of heirs. The
(1) "heir apparent"
(2) "heir presumptive"

Princess Elizabeth was one kind prior to 1952, and Prince Charles is the other kind today. Which is which and why?
Wizard
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Wizard
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May 23rd, 2012 at 9:49:29 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin


Quiz: There are two kinds of heirs. The
(1) "heir apparent"
(2) "heir presumptive"

Princess Elizabeth was one kind prior to 1952, and Prince Charles is the other kind today. Which is which and why?



I might get them backwards, but I'm going to say that Elizabeth was the "heir apparent" because she was first in line to the throne. However, if her father had fathered a boy then she would fall behind him in the pecking order. I understand this rule was just changed very recently, to not give favoritism to male heirs.

Prince Charles is "presumptive" because nobody can assume a spot higher than him.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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