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Nareed
Nareed
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April 28th, 2012 at 8:51:42 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

In Castillian it sounds closer to a 'z'.



And in Sonora they pronounce "ch" as if it were "sh." Accents vary all over the world.

Quote:

In general when you do a spelling change to preserve standard pronounciation it is called an orthographic irregularity.



Frankly Spanish ought to drop the "c," "q," and "z" and make do with "k" and "s" instead.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
Wizard
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Wizard
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April 28th, 2012 at 9:04:23 PM permalink
Fecha: 29-4-12
Palabra: Lío


Today's SWD means a fuss or predicament.

I wonder if Americans named Leo get teased behind their backs when they go to Spanish-speaking countries. Here comes Leo, I bet he is going to make a fuss about something.

Ejemplo time.

El Skipper dició, "¿Gilligan, que lío me metes este vez?" = The Skipper said, "Gillgian, what mess did you put me in this time?"
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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April 28th, 2012 at 9:08:55 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

El Skipper dició, "¿Gilligan, que lío me metes este vez?" = The Skipper said, "Gillgian, what mess did you put me in this time?"



While there's no word that does duty for "skipper" in Spanish, it's usually translated as "Capitán." But aside from that:

"El Capitán diJO 'Gilligan, ¿EN qué lio me HAS METIDO AHORA?' "
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
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April 28th, 2012 at 10:24:50 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

El Capitán diJO 'Gilligan



Here are some common Irregular verbs in the Preterite:

Andar
anduve anduviste anduvo anduvimos anduvieron
Conducir
conduje condujiste condujo condujimos condujeron
Decir
dije dijiste dijo dijimos dijeron
Estar
estuve estuviste estuvo estuvimos estuvieron
Hacer
hice hiciste hizo hicimos hicieron
Poner
puse pusiste puso pusimos pusieron
Poder
pude pudiste pudo pudimos pudieron
Querer
quise quisiste quiso quisimos quisieron
Saber
supe supiste supo supimos supieron
Tener
tuve tuviste tuvo tuvimos tuvieron
Traer
traje trajiste trajo trajimos trajeron
Venir
vine viniste vino vinimos vinieron

Irregulars which use a "J" in the Preterite only add "-eron" (NOT "-ieron") to the third-person plural
Doc
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April 29th, 2012 at 8:37:44 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 29-4-12
Palabra: Lío


Today's SWD means a fuss or predicament. "


Is that the source for the name of the comic strip?
pacomartin
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April 29th, 2012 at 2:30:01 PM permalink
Quote: Doc

Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 29-4-12
Palabra: Lío


Today's SWD means a fuss or predicament. "


Is that the source for the name of the comic strip?





It's a good theory. I've read several interviews but apparently nobody asks the author about the title. The idiom que lío means "What is the fuss?", which seems in keeping with the character in the comic strip who seems nonplussed by the world around him.

The macron above the 'o' in the name of the comic strip is not a feature of Spanish, but the author may be referring to a related word in Latin or another Romance language.
Wizard
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Wizard
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April 29th, 2012 at 9:04:01 PM permalink
Fecha: 30-04-12
Palabra: Plumazo


Today's SWD means a jiffy, or figurative "breeze." Reverso also lists "in the stroke of a pen." Could the word be connected to pluma (pen)? Plumazo should not be confused with brisa, which means a literal breeze (as in from the wind).

Ejemplo time.

Mi deberes de matemáticas es demasiado fácil. Acabaré en un plumanzo. = My math homework is too easy. I will finish it in a jiffy.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
pacomartin
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April 29th, 2012 at 10:29:30 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 30-04-12
Palabra: Plumazo


Today's SWD means a jiffy, or figurative "breeze." Reverso also lists "in the stroke of a pen." Could the word be connected to pluma (pen)? Plumazo should not be confused with brisa, which means a literal breeze (as in from the wind).

Ejemplo time.

Mi deberes de matemáticas es demasiado fácil. Acabaré en un plumanzo. = My math homework is too easy. I will finish it in a jiffy.




Pluma literraly means feather, which has come to mean "pen". It's like the English word plumage.

The "in a jiffy" is colloquial meaning. When the REVERSO dictionary says (Caribe), that is short for Carribbean.

The word carries the connotation of dashing off a written notice, or of editing someone's copy by crossing out things quickly. It can mean to delete things expeditiously in colloquial speach.

This corporation named their web site Plumazo :
The word 'plumazo' (pronounced plue-mah'-zo) comes from a Spanish word that can be translated, loosely, as 'a stroke of a pen or brush' and describes the variety of servicesówriting, editing, and paintingówe provide. I am part business professional and part artist and wanted a name that related to both fields. Searching for a domain name that related to writing and painting, all the 'good ones' were taken. Here is where my wife's Hispanic background came in handy. She suggested looking for Spanish words about writing and painting. Once we found plumazo, and that it was available as a domain name, that was that.
Wizard
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April 30th, 2012 at 1:50:33 AM permalink
Thanks, Paco. I can't think of any follow-up questions, at least on that topic.

However, I'm having trouble with what I think is a figure of speech. How would you translate this:

Las chicas se han acercado a él para dorarle la píldora.

As near as I can tell it means "The girls had gathered around him to brown the pill."

Here is another one. What does suele mean in this sentence:

Suele encontrar todo tip de barbaridades.

The dictionary says it comes from the verb solar, which means to tile (a roof) or sole (a shoe). Neither seems to fit.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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April 30th, 2012 at 4:37:30 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means a jiffy, or figurative "breeze."



The DRAE doesn't say that. And I've never encountered it that way. It could be new slang. The dictionary does say it means "Denota el modo expeditivo de abolir o suprimir algo." meaning "denotes the expeditious way of suppressing or abolishing something."

Quote:

Reverso also lists "in the stroke of a pen."



That's the only meaning I've ever seen or heard used. It's not a very common word.

Quote:

Mi deberes de matemáticas es demasiado fácil. Acabaré en un plumanzo. = My math homework is too easy. I will finish it in a jiffy.



"... SON demasiado fácilES."

BTW, while "deberes" is a perfectly good word and you used it correctly, no one uses it often. The word we use for homework is "tarea."
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal

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