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Nareed
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April 25th, 2012 at 1:02:23 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Literally, I would say that is "I call myself Paco." I know that is how you're supposed to say it, but if you're trying to say "I am called Paco" wouldn't it be Me llama Paco.?



I'm not sure I understand, but "me llama Paco" means "Paco's calling me."
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Wizard
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April 25th, 2012 at 2:06:04 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I'm not sure I understand, but "me llama Paco" means "Paco's calling me."



I changed the conjugation to llama, because I was trying to say nobody in particular calls me Paco. My original point was that I was saying Me llamo Paco. is "I call myself Paco." If you must choose a subject, how would you literally say "They call me Paco."?
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Nareed
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April 25th, 2012 at 2:16:05 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

If you must choose a subject, how would you literally say "They call me Paco."?



"Me llamaN Paco."
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Wizard
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April 25th, 2012 at 2:19:00 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"Me llamaN Paco."



Thanks, how about "He calls me Paco."
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Nareed
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April 25th, 2012 at 2:28:25 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks, how about "He calls me Paco."



You have a choice.

"Me llama Paco." "Llama" in this case is the third person conjugation and is indistinct regarding gender.

If you want to be more specific, you'd say "El me llama Paco."
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Wizard
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April 25th, 2012 at 2:40:15 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You have a choice.

"Me llama Paco." "Llama" in this case is the third person conjugation and is indistinct regarding gender.



Quote: Nareed

I'm not sure I understand, but "me llama Paco" means "Paco's calling me."



So, how do you know whether Me llama Paco refers to "He calls me Paco" or "Paco's calling me."
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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April 25th, 2012 at 2:51:29 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

So, how do you know whether Me llama Paco refers to "He calls me Paco" or "Paco's calling me."



Right. Sorry. It's a bit general and you'd have to determine meaning by context. But in both cases third person is being used.

So, let's review:

"me llama Paco" can mean "Paco's caling me," or "he/she calls me Paco." Now, if I wanted to tell you Paco's calling you on the phone, I'd say "te llama Paco," that doesn't mean "he calls you Paco." I mean, literally it can, but it's seldom used that way.
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pacomartin
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April 25th, 2012 at 3:50:50 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"me llama Paco" can mean "Paco's caling me," or "he/she calls me Paco." Now, if I wanted to tell you Paco's calling you on the phone, I'd say "te llama Paco,"



But in third person, there is a different pronoun which removes the ambiguity (except for gender)

se llama Paco = "He calls himself Paco" or "She calls herself Paco" (if the name were ambiguous)
le llama Paco = "Paco's calling him/her"

As a good exercise, Wizard, try translating the following sentence with the pronoun "it", the adjective "obvious", and the infinitive "raining".
It is obvious that it is raining.
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Wizard
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April 25th, 2012 at 10:54:47 PM permalink
Quote: paco

As a good exercise, Wizard, try translating the following sentence ... It is obvious that it is raining.



Hay obvio que está lloviendo.

I have my doubts about the hay, a form of ser. It obviously isn't permanently obvious. However, it doesn't feel right to use está twice in the same sentence. It also seems like lots of sentences begin with hay. So, I'm going more on feel than logic on this one. Now, watch me get that right, and blow something I took for granted.

Fecha: 4-26-12
Palabra: Arriesgar


Today's SWD is appropriate for a site about gambling. It means to risk. A related word is riesgo, which means a risk (noun). This word was used in some articles Paco suggested I go over with my Peruvian tutor in this post.

The advanced readers can take the day off from their extra credit question, and focus their energy on the MegaMillions' rel='nofollow' target='_blank'>http://wizardofvegas.com/forum/questions-and-answers/math/9578-lottery-jackpot-sharing-parardox/#post141782]MegaMillions paradox thread.

Ejemplo time.

Voy a arriesgar mi dinero en la lotería, porque predecí sólo 3,7 ganadores. = I'm going to risk my money on the lottery because I predict only 3.7 winners.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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April 26th, 2012 at 9:33:50 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Hay obvio que está lloviendo.

I have my doubts about the hay, a form of ser. It obviously isn't permanently obvious. However, it doesn't feel right to use está twice in the same sentence. It also seems like lots of sentences begin with hay. So, I'm going more on feel than logic on this one. Now, watch me get that right, and blow something I took for granted.



Actually "hay" is a conjugation of "haber", and it mean "there is" not "it is".

But I was also trying to tie up the list of pronouns we have been going through. Nareed pointed out that the reflexive and indirect object pronouns are the same in 1st and 2nd person, so there is some ambiguity about the meaning of the sentence. It must be inferred by context. I added that in the 3rd person there are different pronouns so there is no ambiguity.

But while it is very common to start a sentence with "it is" in English, there is no commonly used pronoun for "it" (as a subject) in Spanish .

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