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Wizard
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Wizard
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April 7th, 2012 at 6:54:48 AM permalink
Fecha: 7 de April, 2012
Palabra: Compadecer


Today's SWD means to feel pity for.

A question for the advanced readers is how would compadecer differ from sentir lástima?

Ejemplo time.

Despues perdí mi novia por un baterista con cabello largo, me compadecí a mí mismo. = After I lost my girlfriend to a long-haired drummer, I felt sorry for myself.
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Nareed
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April 7th, 2012 at 7:24:23 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

A question for the advanced readers is how would compadecer differ from sentir lástima?



I think "compadecer" should mean, or at one time meant, "to feel compassion for," which would be different from feeling pity. But, a) I'm not sure at all and b) let me turn the question around: how does "to feel pity for" differ from "to feel sorry for"? >:)

Quote:

Despues perdí mi novia por un baterista con cabello largo, me compadecí a mí mismo. = After I lost my girlfriend to a long-haired drummer, I felt sorry for myself.



"Después de QUE perdí A mi novia...." The rest is ok.
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pacomartin
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April 7th, 2012 at 3:36:08 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

But, a) I'm not sure at all and b) let me turn the question around: how does "to feel pity for" differ from "to feel sorry for"? >:)



Well.once again you have an Anglo Saxon word and a Latin word doing double duty. Only very rarely did one verb completely push the other one out of common speech.

The meaning "to feel pity for" is about 5 centuries old in English.

Sorry is not related to 'sorrow' even though they have similar meanings.

The use of 'sorry' as an apology is a relatively new use, only recorded from 1834. Before that it only meant "regrettable or deplorable or unfortunate".

pacomartin
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April 7th, 2012 at 3:53:58 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Compadecer: Today's SWD means to feel pity for.



compadecer and agradecer similar .

I feel that I should point out that this word is spelled differently from the far more common words that are variations of "decir" with different prefixes.


decir (from latin dicĕre).
antedecir
bendecir
condecir
contradecir
desdecir
interdecir
maldecir
predecir
redecir
Wizard
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April 8th, 2012 at 1:20:07 PM permalink
I just split off all the taco posts to Tacos!.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
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April 9th, 2012 at 4:18:22 AM permalink
Fecha: 9 de Abril, 2012
Palabra: ñoño


Today's SWD means a dullard/drip/spineless person. I encountered it as a translation of "idiots." However, I surprisingly don't see the word often, maybe because it sounds like baby talk. Speaking of which, "nono" is baby-talk Chinese for meat.

It should not be confused with nono, which means ninth.

I'm eager to hear Paco's etymology of this one.

Ejemplo time.

Sentí como un ñoño cuando ella dijo, "No es que encuentro apostar aburrido. Es que TE encuentro aburrido." = I felt like a drip when she said, "It isn't that I find gambling boring. It is that I find YOU boring."
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
pacomartin
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April 9th, 2012 at 4:51:35 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I'm eager to hear Paco's etymology of this one.





It came from the Late Latin word nonnus monk; tutor; old person (possibly from children's speech)

I will try to figure out how it evolved that way. At first glance it looks as if the word developed from the subject of the noun, to an imitation of the child saying the word. From there to a simpleton who is like a child.
Nareed
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April 9th, 2012 at 6:56:37 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD means a dullard/drip/spineless person.



I thought it meant fat :)

The one place I've ever encountered that word is the show where Paco's picture came from. The fat kid was called "Ñoño."

Quote:

It should not be confused with nono, which means ninth.



Now, that I knew. You can also say "decimo nono" which means nineteenth. However, the term is very seldomly used. Mostly we say "noveno," when meaning "ninth"

Quote:

Sentí como un ñoño cuando ella dijo, "No es que encuentro apostar aburrido. Es que TE encuentro aburrido." = I felt like a drip when she said, "It isn't that I find gambling boring. It is that I find YOU boring."



"ME sentí..." The rest is ok.

I see you ran into the wall of "What do you call "gambling" in Spanish?"
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Wizard
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April 9th, 2012 at 4:11:38 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

I see you ran into the wall of "What do you call "gambling" in Spanish?"



Indeed. Apostar means "to bet," but there doesn't seem to be a distinct term for "gambling." Correct me if I'm wrong.

Related question -- it is a figure of speech here to say "I bet..." and then something you feel is likely, but not certain, to happen. For example, "I bet our flight is going to be overbooked." However, it doesn't really imply the person is suggesting a wager. Does this happen in Spanish as well?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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April 9th, 2012 at 5:42:02 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Indeed. Apostar means "to bet," but there doesn't seem to be a distinct term for "gambling." Correct me if I'm wrong.



You're right. That's why I called it a wall.

Quote:

Related question -- it is a figure of speech here to say "I bet..." and then something you feel is likely, but not certain, to happen. For example, "I bet our flight is going to be overbooked." However, it doesn't really imply the person is suggesting a wager. Does this happen in Spanish as well?



Yes! It's not what you'd call very common, but it does get used. Both a simple "te apuesto a que el vuelo sale tarde," and the more complicated "te apuesto un millón de pesos que ganamos la licitación." And also "wanna bet?" as in:

Persona 1: No creo que salgamos tarde
Persona 2: ¿quieres apostar?
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