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Wizard
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Wizard
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March 24th, 2012 at 11:21:54 AM permalink
Fecha: 24 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: Pillar


There seem to be a lot of words for "catch" in Spanish. Here are some of them: atrapar, pescar,capturar, agarrar, coger, and this new one to my list: pillar.

I, of course, defer to the advanced readers, but it seems to me that pillar applies to catching such things as people, a taxi, a concept, or a sickness. It would not seem to apply to catching an object with your hands. To be honest, I'm not sure which one is appropriate for catching a ball, for example.

Before Nareed asks where I got another obscure word, here is the sentence where I found it: Pero esos tipos podían ester escondidos en cualquier parte para pillarnos desprevendidos. = But those types are able to hide anywhere to catch us unprepared. (Again, my translation to English.)

Ejemplo time.

Tengo prisa para pillar el avión a tiempo. = I'm in a hurry to catch the plane on time.
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Nareed
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March 24th, 2012 at 11:34:25 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I, of course, defer to the advanced readers, but it seems to me that pillar applies to catching such things as people, a taxi, a concept, or a sickness.



Mostly people. at least I've never heard it used in any other way. It comes from, or is related to, "pillo" which is one word for "thief."

Quote:

It would not seem to apply to catching an object with your hands. To be honest, I'm not sure which one is appropriate for catching a ball, for example.



Well, in Spanish you don't catch a plane, you take one. For a ball, the word is either "atrapar" or "cachar."

Quote:

Before Nareed asks where I got another obscure word, here is the sentence where I found it: Pero esos tipos podían ester escondidos en cualquier parte para pillarnos desprevendidos. = But those types are able to hide anywhere to catch us unprepared. (Again, my translation to English.)



You need other books, if you want my opinion. I didn't start reading in English in order to learn the language, or even to practice it. Simply put the books I wanted to read were available only in English. So maybe that makes a difference.

Quote:

Tengo prisa para pillar el avión a tiempo. = I'm in a hurry to catch the plane on time.



Not bad, but it's not right (assuming that "pillar el avión" makes sense, which I don't think it does). You didn't say "I'm in a hurry" but rather "I have a hurry," which is bad English but how the word is often used in Spanish. If you wanted to hurry someone up because you're in a hurry yourself, you'd say "Rápido que tengo prisa."

Anyway, the right expression in this case is "Llevo prisa para tomar el avión a tiempo."
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Wizard
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March 24th, 2012 at 12:40:15 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You didn't say "I'm in a hurry" but rather "I have a hurry," which is bad English but how the word is often used in Spanish. If you wanted to hurry someone up because you're in a hurry yourself, you'd say "Rápido que tengo prisa."



It took me months to get into the habit of saying I "have" color, frio, medio, prisa, etc. with tener. It sounded ridiculous to me to say that one "has" these things. Of course, in English we "are" these things. So now I'm scratching my head again when you say that I said "I have hurry." I wish I were on speaking terms with my tutor to get her take on this. It used to drive her crazy when I would say something like "Estoy frio."
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pacomartin
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March 24th, 2012 at 2:59:31 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It took me months to get into the habit of saying I "have" color, frio, medio, prisa, etc. with tener. It sounded ridiculous to me to say that one "has" these things. Of course, in English we "are" these things. So now I'm scratching my head again when you say that I said "I have hurry."




(transitive) To have, possess an object.
Examples: (1) Ella tiene seis hermanos. — “She has six brothers.” (2) Tengo una pluma. — “I have a pen.”

(transitive) To feel (internally).
Examples: (1) Él tiene mucho cariño para ella. — “He feels much admiration for her.” (2) Tengo frío. — “I feel cold.” (3) Tenemos hambre. — “We are hungry.” (literally: “We feel hunger.”)

I think you have to translate the verb "tener" into two different English verbs that are both Anglo Saxon in origin. One is "to have" and the other is "to feel".

You are saying "I feel hurried" , just as you are saying "I feel cold", or "I feel hot".

------------
Proponents of clarifying the English language suggest that you try and substitute the following types of verbs "taste, feel, smell, sound, grow, remain, stay, and turn" instead of a conjugate of the verb "to be". Instead of saying "the chicken is salty" say "the chicken tastes salty". Instead of saying "I am bored", say "I feel bored". You can think of Spanish as forcing you not to use the simple copula.


Quote: Wizard

I wish I were on speaking terms with my tutor to get her take on this.



If men are from Mars, and women are from Venus, then Latinas are from Neptune. I can't imagine you said anything nasty.

pacomartin
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March 24th, 2012 at 3:00:51 PM permalink
(Question #1) The dictionary lists these words as synonyms. Perhaps you could explain the difference?
pillo, travieso, revoltoso, enredador, inquieto, vivaracho, juguetón, diablillo, pícaro

The definition in the dictionary is kind of a mild word for "thief". Like something you might call a dog who steals a bone.

(Question #2)
One web site says that "pues, mire Ud..." is an informal command that means little more than "look ...".

They add the comment -
This is a good one; you can start every sentence you say to a professor with and you'll seem very intellectual while you're actually stalling for time.)

It seems to go with this image: The guy is stalling for time, then had admits he hasn't got a clue. Is that the way you would read it?



(Question #3)
This joke looks like "I've almost got it; have your bag ready". Is that a good translation?
Nareed
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March 24th, 2012 at 11:18:58 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

It took me months to get into the habit of saying I "have" color, frio, medio, prisa, etc. with tener. It sounded ridiculous to me to say that one "has" these things. Of course, in English we "are" these things. So now I'm scratching my head again when you say that I said "I have hurry." I wish I were on speaking terms with my tutor to get her take on this. It used to drive her crazy when I would say something like "Estoy frio."



You should know better by now than to expect full consistency in languages :)

You can say "tengo prisa" as I illustrated in my post, but as an undefined hurry only. When you're in a hurry to do soemthing, then the correct expression is "llevo prisa" or "traigo prisa." If you say "tengo prisa para tomar el avión," you'd be understood, but probably someone will feel the need to correct you. and you can't afford to waste time on that when you're in a hurry to catch a plane, right? ;)
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Wizard
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March 25th, 2012 at 7:06:25 AM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

I think you have to translate the verb "tener" into two different English verbs that are both Anglo Saxon in origin. One is "to have" and the other is "to feel".

You are saying "I feel hurried" , just as you are saying "I feel cold", or "I feel hot".



I agree, but I still don't understand why Nareed said that I said "I have hurry."

Quote:

If men are from Mars, and women are from Venus, then Latinas are from Neptune. I can't imagine you said anything nasty.



I'd rather not get into it on the forum, but it wasn't over anything I said. It may just be that she got busy with full time work, and just didn't have time for tutoring any more. Despite the Neptune thing, I'm on the market for a Latina hermosa to take her place.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Wizard
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March 25th, 2012 at 8:14:24 AM permalink
Fecha: 25 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: energúmeno


According to SpanishDict.com, energúmeno means:

1 (loco) madman/madwoman
ponerse como un energúmeno to get mad
2 (gritón) loud and irascible person
3 (Política) fanatic; extremist
4 (poseso) person possessed of the devil

However, where I encountered it, it was translated from "teenager," for which there is no direct translation in Spanish. Here is the full sentence:

Ese camino resulta tenebroso ya de por sí, sin necesidad de que te esté dando caza una camioneta llena de energúmenos.

Here is the original English:

Snake Road is scary enough on its own without having a truckload of teenagers hunting you down.

Ejemplo time.

El cura intentaba sacar el demonio de el energúmeno. = The priest tried to remove the demon from the lunatic. (dedicated to FrG).
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Nareed
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March 25th, 2012 at 8:50:21 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

However, where I encountered it, it was translated from "teenager," for which there is no direct translation in Spanish.



There is a Spanish word for teenager: "adolescente."

I tell you, no wonder I quit reading Spanish translations...

Quote:

El cura intentaba sacar el demonio de el energúmeno. = The priest tried to remove the demon from the lunatic. (dedicated to FrG).



The DRAE defines it as "someone possessed" and "someone furious and wild." I suppose madman fits, if talking about a violent crazy person. If pressed for a good equivalent term in English, I'd choose berserk.

Oh, your example is fine, although you may consider using "del" rather than "de el." Either way is correct.
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pacomartin
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March 25th, 2012 at 9:56:56 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

However, where I encountered it, it was translated from "teenager,"



Judging by the photos associated with this word, it seems like too strong of a word to use as a translation for noisy teenagers. It seems like mostly you are referring to sociopaths.

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