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aluisio
aluisio
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March 21st, 2012 at 6:55:31 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

That's an interesting thing to say, as your native language, if memory serves, is Portuguese. Mine is Spanish and I also found English rather easy to learn, after getting over a few bumps concerning syntax and pronunciation.



You are right, Nareed. I am a native portuguese speaker. I think we are both used to conjugate verbs in many tenses and sujects that the shortcuts provided by the English Language states how practical is the use of the idiom.
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Nareed
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March 21st, 2012 at 6:57:58 PM permalink
Quote: aluisio

You are right, Nareed. I am a native portuguese speaker. I think we are both used to conjugate verbs in many tenses and sujects that the shortcuts provided by the English Language states how practical is the use of the idiom.



Something to that. I also found English overall to be more compact, flexible and versatile.
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Wizard
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Wizard
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March 22nd, 2012 at 8:17:47 AM permalink
Fecha: 22 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: Atajar


According to SpanishDict.com, atajar has eight different usages. However, the one I encountered was the first one listed, to take a short cut. Here is the sentence from my book:

Atajamos por un par de patios para llegar hasta allí. = We took a short cut through a couple yards to get there.

However, that does not excuse me from making my own example.

Ejemplo time.

La taxista dijo que atajamos, pero en realidad me llevó por una ruta mucho más larga para aumentar la tarifa. = The taxi driver said we taking a shortcut, but in reality he took me on a much longer route, to increase the fare.

Note: This example dedicated to the Vegas taxi drivers using the airport tunnel to take tourists to Strip hotels. As usual, I'm pretty much taking a guess on the paras and pors. I would not say my chance of being right is above 51%.
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pacomartin
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March 22nd, 2012 at 12:54:27 PM permalink
Quote: aluisio

You are right, Nareed. I am a native portuguese speaker. I think we are both used to conjugate verbs in many tenses and sujects that the shortcuts provided by the English Language states how practical is the use of the idiom.



I doubt very much that Spanish or Portuguese has a word like 'run" with 946 definitions. While I appreciate that some Spanish words have more than dozen definitions, I think that the extreme use of a single word is not characteristic of Romance languages. Most of the time, I feel like the definitions for a Spanish word are fairly cohesive.

As I said earlier, half of written English consists of only a 100 words. Mostly because they are simple helper words, but a lot has to do with their huge flexibility.

My Spanish teacher always complained about the English verb "to play", that it had so many possible uses. The dictionary suggests
jugar
tocar (musical instrument)
obra de teatro (theatrical play)
obra
caracterizar
practicar
juguetear
desempeñar
ejecutar
disputar
enfrentarse
encarnar
Nareed
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March 22nd, 2012 at 1:22:43 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

According to SpanishDict.com, atajar has eight different usages. However, the one I encountered was the first one listed, to take a short cut. Here is the sentence from my book:



The word isn't used much, and when it is it means something like "to catch someone on the road," or "to catch a ball in a game." I had no idea it meant to take a short cut, although I know the word for shortcut, much used, is "atajo." But the dictionary does say you're right.

Quote:

La taxista dijo que atajamos, pero en realidad me llevó por una ruta mucho más larga para aumentar la tarifa. = The taxi driver said we taking a shortcut, but in reality he took me on a much longer route, to increase the fare.

Note: This example dedicated to the Vegas taxi drivers using the airport tunnel to take tourists to Strip hotels. As usual, I'm pretty much taking a guess on the paras and pors. I would not say my chance of being right is above 51%.



The good news is your example is perfectly all right. Except "LA taxista" means "the female taxi driver." If the driver is male, as per your example, he'd be "EL taxista." But that's a minor quibble.

The bad news is you erred on the English part (don't edit the post).
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Wizard
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Wizard
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March 22nd, 2012 at 1:26:58 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

The good news is your example is perfectly all right. Except "LA taxista" means "the female taxi driver." If the driver is male, as per your example, he'd be "EL taxista."



Perhaps I meant a female taxi driver ;-). To be honest, I knew the word was taxista, and played it safe by matching the article to the "a." Why isn't a male taxi driver a taxisto?

Quote:

The bad news is you erred on the English part (don't edit the post).



Doh! Actually, I'm happy and surprised I got the Spanish right.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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March 22nd, 2012 at 2:04:50 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

To be honest, I knew the word was taxista, and played it safe by matching the article to the "a."



I assumed as much.

Quote:

Why isn't a male taxi driver a taxisto?



Some nouns are gender neutral or rather use the same word regarldess of gender. That's the case with "taxista." Others don't, like for instance "doctor" is for a male and "doctora" for a female. But if you go through a long list of professions or titles, you'll find few, if any, ending in "o."
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Wizard
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Wizard
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March 22nd, 2012 at 2:15:51 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Some nouns are gender neutral or rather use the same word regarldess of gender. That's the case with "taxista." Others don't, like for instance "doctor" is for a male and "doctora" for a female. But if you go through a long list of professions or titles, you'll find few, if any, ending in "o."



Qué interestante. So, would a male prostitute be an el puta?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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March 22nd, 2012 at 2:18:16 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Qué interestante. So, would a male prostitute be an el puta?



Not even close :)

Unfortunately that's not something I'm comfrotable discussing. There is a noun for a male ending in an "o," but the meaning is a very derogatory word for "gay."
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Wizard
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March 23rd, 2012 at 8:06:41 AM permalink
Fecha: 23 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: gallito/a


Today's SWD means cocky. It obviously comes from the word gallo, which means rooster.

I find it interesting that in both English and Spanish an adjective would be formed from a rooster, and meaning the same thing, as near as I can tell.

The word for a hen in Spanish is gallina. Would gallinita be a legitimate Spanish word to draw a comparison to a hen?

Ejemplo time.

Sentí gallito, así intenté enumerar 20 dígitos de pi. Sin embargo, ella no pareció impresionado. = I was feeling cocky so I tried to recite 20 digits of pi. However, she didn't seem impressed.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.

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