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pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 14th, 2012 at 4:37:45 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Trivia, the company WalMart bought out, which owned several supermarkets and restaurants in Mexico, was called "Grupo Cifra." No, I don't know why they used that name.



Mexico’s Jeronimo Arango and his two brothers, are normally listed as three of Mexico's billionaires by Forbes. The editor of the list talks abou Finding Mexico's Missing Billionaires.

Jeronimo Arango is not a flashy billionaire, and lives quietly in Los Angeles.
Nareed
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March 14th, 2012 at 4:44:42 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Mexico’s Jeronimo Arango and his two brothers, are normally listed as three of Mexico's billionaires by Forbes. The editor of the list talks abou Finding Mexico's Missing Billionaires.



You neglect to mention he and his brothers owned Cifra.

Is he related to Pancho Villa? His real name was Doroteo Arango.

I forget whether I kept a Cifra credit card intact or not. it doesn't seem likely...
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pacomartin
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March 14th, 2012 at 5:22:05 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

You neglect to mention he and his brothers owned Cifra.
Is he related to Pancho Villa? His real name was Doroteo Arango.



José Doroteo Arango Arámbula (Pancho Villa) died only 4 years before Doroteo Arango (future owner of CIFRA) was born. I assume he was not related, but he was given the name because of the respect that Pancho Villa had among Northern Mexicans.
Nareed
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March 14th, 2012 at 5:30:43 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

José Doroteo Arango Arámbula (Pancho Villa) died only 4 years before Doroteo Arango (future owner of CIFRA) was born. I assume he was not related, but he was given the name because of the respect that Pancho Villa had among Northern Mexicans.



First names are given for any reason. Family names are strictly inherited from both parents. So if his family name is Arango, he's potentially related to Pancho Villa. But then there are some common names. In Nuevo Leon an awful lot of people carry the surname "Garza." Elsewhere in the north, Arango might be a common name.
Donald Trump is a fucking criminal
pacomartin
pacomartin
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March 14th, 2012 at 7:44:13 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

First names are given for any reason. Family names are strictly inherited from both parents.



One of the most famous bits in television history in the 1950's had to do with a contestant on You Bet Your Life named Ramiro Gonzales Gonzales who was a Mexican American from San Antonio, Texas. Since very few Americans knew the Spanish custom of taking last names from both your parents, they think it is very funny that he had the same last name twice. It's clear that Ramiro is a natural comedian you should see the segment on You Bet Your Life (12 Feb 1953). John Wayne saw this episode and thought it was so funny that he cast Ramiro in several of his movies. His grandson (Clifton Gonzales Webb) is a television star today.

RGG was completely illiterate. His wife coached him through his scripts.
Wizard
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March 15th, 2012 at 8:06:37 AM permalink
Sorry to change the topic, but it is a new day.

Fecha: 15 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: Saldar


Today's SWD doesn't have a direct English equivalent. My best explanation is that it means to settle, sell off, clear, result in etc.. Here is the sentence where I encountered it, Así que si me presento para tesorero es casi seguro que saldré elegido. I would translate that as "So if I run for treasurer, it is almost certain that it will pay off in being elected."

However, that doesn't relieve me from doing my own example.

Ejemplo time.

El baile saldado en fracaso. Nadie habría bailado conmigo. = The dance resulted in failure. Nobody would dance with me.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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March 15th, 2012 at 8:27:58 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Palabra: Saldar

Today's SWD doesn't have a direct English equivalent. My best explanation is that it means to settle, sell off, clear, result in etc.. Here is the sentence where I encountered it, Así que si me presento para tesorero es casi seguro que saldré elegido. I would translate that as "So if I run for treasurer, it is almost certain that it will pay off in being elected."



Let's start near the end. "Saldré" is the future tense of the verb "salir." So the man is saying "So if I run for treasurer it's almost certain I'll wind up being elected." Now let's back up. "Salir" means "to exit," "to leave" "to turn up" (in some cases), "to come out". A related noun is "salida" = "exit." Suppose we're playing craps and I can't see the dice from where I'm standing. I might ask you "¿Viste que número salió?" meaning "Did you see what number turned up?"

Funny thing is "saldar" si also a word, but with a very different meaning. It's related to the noun "saldo" meaning "balance" as in the balance of a financial statement (And only in that sense. It does not mean a balance scale, equilibrium, or any other kind of balance). Ok? When you settle a debt, for example, by paying the full balance owed, you can say "He saldado la deuda" = "I've settled the debt." This verb has an implicit finality. You've paid what you owed and the debt is done. If you pay less than the full amount owed, then you didn't settle it.

This verb isn't used often.


Quote:

El baile saldado en fracaso. Nadie habría bailado conmigo. = The dance resulted in failure. Nobody would dance with me.



Close, even so, which is nothing short of remarkable. But the phrasing is very awkward. I can't really come up with a good correction suing the word you chose. It's just hard to use "salir" along the line of "reult" in the tense you're using (whetever tense that is). So:

"El baile ha sido un fracaso."

That's about the best I can do. As a counter-example I proppose the following:

"Tenía muchas esperanzas de salir de vacaciones pero todo el viaje salió mal." = "I had high hopes for going out on vacation but the whole trip turned up badly."

BTW, the Spanish word for "balance" is <drumroll> "Balance," of course with Spanish pronunciation. For once it means almost the same thing in Spanish as it does in English.
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pacomartin
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March 15th, 2012 at 9:21:38 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed


Let's start near the end. "Saldré" is the future tense of the verb "salir." So the man is saying "So if I run for treasurer it's almost certain I'll wind up being elected."

Funny thing is "saldar" is also a word, but with a very different meaning. It's related to the noun "saldo" meaning "balance" as in the balance of a financial statement (And only in that sense. It does not mean a balance scale, equilibrium, or any other kind of balance). Ok? When you settle a debt, for example, by paying the full balance owed, you can say "He saldado la deuda" = "I've settled the debt." This verb has an implicit finality. You've paid what you owed and the debt is done. If you pay less than the full amount owed, then you didn't settle it.

This verb isn't used often.


BTW, the Spanish word for "balance" is <drumroll> "Balance," of course with Spanish pronunciation. For once it means almost the same thing in Spanish as it does in English.



Good word Wizard. Very confusing since the verb salir has an irregular stem change in the future so that it looks like a different verb.
saldré - future tense of salir
saldaré - future tense of saldar

We have had a few words in the past, that came to Spanish indirectly from another Romance language.

One such word is saldo which is from Italian, and is recognized in many places in Europe (including Finland and Estonia) as a banking term.

Another such word is balance which came from Old French into French, Spanish and English without any spelling changes. So it is spelled the same in all three languages, but pronounced differently in each one.

Nareed will have to correct me if I am wrong, but from the dictionary definition, Spanish uses balance in the sense of balancing books, balancing on a trapeze, balancing a ship, and balancing options in business. Spanish does not use the word in the English sense of a balanced diet or a balanced lifestyle (where balance is a synonym for equilibrium).
Wizard
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March 15th, 2012 at 10:23:21 AM permalink
Thanks. I indeed got confused between salir y saldar. For what it is worth SpanishDict.com has an example not having to do with debt: "la pelea se saldó con once heridos -> eleven people were injured in the brawl"

Could one also use salir in the above sentence?
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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March 15th, 2012 at 10:32:33 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Thanks. I indeed got confused between salir y saldar. For what it is worth SpanishDict.com has an example not having to do with debt: "la pelea se saldó con once heridos -> eleven people were injured in the brawl"

Could one also use salir in the above sentence?



Yes. But again phrasing is important. I'd say "Once salieron heridos de la pelea."
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