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Wizard
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Wizard
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March 4th, 2012 at 4:03:00 AM permalink
Fecha: 4 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: casillero


Today's SWD I think can mean locker or a some kind of sorting rack. Perhaps like the kind in a kindergarten, where each kid puts his/her items. Then again, there is another word for locker, taquilla. In the context I found the word it meant locker, like the kind in a middle school.

So, the question for the advanced readers is what is the difference between a casillero y taquilla?

Ejemplo time.

Lo siento, Sr. Mano; debí salir ese libro en mi casillero. = I'm sorry, Mr. Hand; I must have left that book in my locker.
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Nareed
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March 4th, 2012 at 4:21:23 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Today's SWD I think can mean locker or a some kind of sorting rack. Perhaps like the kind in a kindergarten, where each kid puts his/her items.



It means locker.

Quote:

Then again, there is another word for locker, taquilla. In the context I found the word it meant locker, like the kind in a middle school.



I had to go to the dictionary for this one. You are right. howver, the only meaning I know that's used for "taquilla" is a ticket booth or box office.

The only other work for "casillero" that's commonly used is "locker." :) Seriously. In highschool everyone use that term almost exclusively.

Quote:

Lo siento, Sr. Mano; debí salir ese libro en mi casillero. = I'm sorry, Mr. Hand; I must have left that book in my locker.



Mr. Hand? In any case, names shouldn't be translated; except when it's necessary for some specific purpose.

As to the example, the re-translation actually says "[..]I must have to exit that book in my locker." So:

"[..]debo haber dejado ese libro..."
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pacomartin
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March 4th, 2012 at 9:00:03 AM permalink
Quote: Nareed

"[..]debo haber dejado ese libro..."



Nareed made two grammatical changes:
(1) Because it is the "recent past" the proper tense is the "present" tense, not the "preterite"
She replaced "debí" with "debo".

(2) The verbal phrase "haber dejado" is known as a Perfect Infinitive.

(3) The verb "must" in English is a "modal" verb, or one of the auxiliary verbs that we use to describe mood. The full list of modal verbs is: can, could, may, might, will, would, must, shall, should, and 'ought to'. None of the Romance languages have modal verbs, since they have conjugations to describe mood. The verb 'deber' used as a transitive verb means "to owe", but it does double duty as a subsitute for the English modal verbs "must" and "should". As a reflexive verb "deberse a" it means "to be due to".
pacomartin
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Nareed
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March 4th, 2012 at 6:58:05 PM permalink
Quote: pacomartin

Nareed made two grammatical changes:
(1) Because it is the "recent past" the proper tense is the "present" tense, not the "preterite"
She replaced "debí" with "debo".



Well, if I were translating a book or something like that, it would go like this:

"Debo haber dejado el libro..." I must have left the book...

"Debí haber dejado el libro..." I should have left the book...

I should say that "must" and "should" took me a long time to master.
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pacomartin
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March 4th, 2012 at 7:49:23 PM permalink
Quote: Nareed

Well, if I were translating a book or something like that, it would go like this:
"Debo haber dejado el libro..." I must have left the book...
"Debí haber dejado el libro..." I should have left the book...
I should say that "must" and "should" took me a long time to master.





The Viking female "fates" are
1) Urd (PAST),
2) Verdandi (PRESENT),
3) Skuld (FUTURE).

The fate's name "Skuld" is related to "Should" and implies an "obligation".
The verb "must" is usually implies that the action is "necessary or extremely important" particularly in the negative.

But, you are correct, the meanings have become very muddied over the centuries. The difference between "You should see the movie" and "You must see the movie" really have nothing to do with the definitions above.
Wizard
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March 4th, 2012 at 10:02:47 PM permalink
I thought the Three Fates were from Greek mythology.

Quote:

The Fates have the subtle but awesome power of deciding a man's destiny. They assign a man to good or evil. Their most obvious choice is choosing how long a man lives. There are three Fates. Clotho, the spinner, who spins the thread of life. Lachesis, the measurer, who choses the lot in life one will have and measures off how long it is to be. Atropos, she who cannot be turned, who at death with her shears cuts the thread of life.

-- Source: http://www.greekmythology.com/Other_Gods/The_Fates/the_fates.html.
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pacomartin
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March 4th, 2012 at 10:21:25 PM permalink
Quote: Wizard

I thought the Three Fates were from Greek mythology.



The word fate comes from the Greek word theosphaton. There are three fates in Greek mythology.

In both the Greek and Viking mythologies the creatures that determine Fate are identical in purpose, gender and number. They are both above the gods and no one can go against the Fates.The power of the Weird Sisters was inevitable for everyone. In both the mythologies they were thought as sitting around something circular. Keep in mind that 6-7 thousand years ago, all the Indo Europeans were one culture before writing existed in Europe.

In Viking mythology they are three powerful norn maiden giantesses whose arrival ended the golden age of the gods. They have the same function as the fates in Greek mythology. The word norn is related to "twine" because they are weaving destiny (like Clotho), and one of them is named Urðr which means "fate". So sometimes they are called the Viking "fates". I used the word "fate" since I didn't think Nareed would recognize the word "norn".

At least one of them has been incorporated in modern anime. Skuld is the "future" where we get the word "should".
Wizard
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March 5th, 2012 at 8:17:59 AM permalink
Okay, thanks Paco for the lesson on the various Three Fates, but it is a new day so a new Spanish word.

Fecha: 5 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: regañar


Today's SWD means to scold or tell off.

A question for the advanced readers is how does regañar differ from reñir?

Ejemplo time

La repartidora regañarme por no haciendo el apuesto de mujeres suertes. = The dealer scolded me for not making the Lucky Ladies bet.
It's not whether you win or lose; it's whether or not you had a good bet.
Nareed
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March 5th, 2012 at 8:25:44 AM permalink
Quote: Wizard

Fecha: 5 de Marzo, 2012
Palabra: regañar


Today's SWD means to scold or tell off.



This is a problematic word with no clear translation to English. One good approximation is "to be chewed out" or "to chew someone out," however that goes.

Quote:

A question for the advanced readers is how does regañar differ from reñir?



Enormously. "Reñir" means "to fight." Be it with fists, words, swords or guns.

Quote:

La repartidora regañarme por no haciendo el apuesto de mujeres suertes. = The dealer scolded me for not making the Lucky Ladies bet.



I won't even try...

"La dealer me regañó por no hacer la apuesta de Lucky ladies."

You can sub "crupier" for "dealer." "reaprtidor/a" means "delivery person." "Lucky ladies" can be translated literally as "Damas suertudas," or "Damas con suerte," but that sounds awful. Oh, when I tell Vegas stories at work, I do say "el dealer" and everyone understands me.
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